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Thread: A Cornish Census

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    Politics.ie Newbie cornubian's Avatar
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    Default A Cornish Census

    The 2011 UK census must allow the Cornish to record their identity: Census 'must let Cornish record their identity'

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    Can I ask, are there surnames which are specifically Cornish, as in Cornish language, not English (and I don't mean fakey concoctions from English-origin surnames, rather actual Cornish surnames)?

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    Duth Ealla
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    Quote Originally Posted by toxic avenger View Post
    Can I ask, are there surnames which are specifically Cornish, as in Cornish language, not English (and I don't mean fakey concoctions from English-origin surnames, rather actual Cornish surnames)?
    Might be wrong here but...

    By Tre, Tra, Tren you may know the cornish men.

    Trevellyn, Trelayney.

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    Duth Ealla
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornubian View Post
    The 2011 UK census must allow the Cornish to record their identity: Census 'must let Cornish record their identity'
    Teere ha Tavaz Cornubian.

    Fair play to your and your country men for reclaiming both.

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    Politics.ie Member QuizMaster's Avatar
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    That would make me Cornish. My surmane starts like one of those.

    But I'm not, I'm Irish. Ulster through and through.
    If there is a future, it will be Green.

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duth Ealla View Post
    Might be wrong here but...

    By Tre, Tra, Tren you may know the cornish men.

    Trevellyn, Trelayney.
    Hmmm, wonder what the prefix means. Cornish is basically 'south Welsh', I'd have thought their surnames would have been Ap-this or Ap-that in the original. Perhaps Tre/Tra is a specific local variation?

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    Politics.ie Member Pat Mc Larnon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duth Ealla View Post
    Might be wrong here but...

    By Tre, Tra, Tren you may know the cornish men.

    Trevellyn, Trelayney.

    True especially Tre, there are others listed here.

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pat Mc Larnon View Post
    True especially Tre, there are others listed here.

    Interesting, but surely Ahearn, Connor, and so on, are Irish, while other names there like Nicholls and Hendry are clearly English and lowland Scottish...

  9. #9
    Duth Ealla
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    Quote Originally Posted by QuizMaster View Post
    That would make me Cornish. My surmane starts like one of those.

    But I'm not, I'm Irish. Ulster through and through.
    sure your only a settler Quizmaster but still a celt

    seriously though some gaelic names were anglicised in very unsual ways.

    Armstrong being one that comes to mind. Its probably unlikely but it may be that your name is one of those or not Cornish at all.

    ARMSTRONG
    This surname originates in the area along the western Scottish borders; the first recorded bearer was Adam Armstrong, pardoned in Carlisle in 1235 for causing another man’s death. They were among the most notorious of the riding Border clans, who also included the Elliots, the Grahams and the Johnstons, famous for their lawlessness and plunder. When the power of these clans was savagely broken after 1603 by James 1, the Armstrongs scattered, and many migrated to Ulster, where a large number settled in Co Fermanagh. Even today, Fermanagh is home to the largest concentration of Armstrong families in Ireland, although the name is quite common throughout Ulster, particularly in counties Antrim and Tyrone. As well as those of Scottish origin, however, a good number of Irish Armstrongs are of Gaelic Irish extraction. Many of the Trin-Laverys of Co Antrim and the Trainors of counties Tyrone and Monaghan had their surnames mis-translated as Armstrong, from the presence of the Irish for ‘strong’, trean, in their original names.

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    Politics.ie Member QuizMaster's Avatar
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    What about Pen- ?
    Isn't that a Cornish prefix too?
    David Penhaligon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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