Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 13 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 124

Thread: Bloody Sunday 1920

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    In the sticks
    Posts
    93
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Bloody Sunday 1920

    I was wondering if anyone has the most Up-to date information on Bloody Sunday 1920. I know the basic story but having some done some research on it recently discovered some inaccuracies in the traditional telling.
    For instance is anyone aware of any shots being fired from the crowd first that would have made the Auxies fire on the crowd?

    Also Michael Hogan, often recorded as the captain of the Tipp team but apparently was not actually.


    If anyone has any good info please pass it on or direct me to where I can get reliable sources
    An eye for an eye makes us all blind
    Mohandas Gandhi

    Economic Left/Right: -5.88
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.13

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    IRELAND
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Scouts in the spectator stand may have fired warning shots that military were aproaching--some say yes others say no and no one really knows

    Michael Collins got credit for planning it---he was part of it but it was a joint GHQ decision---Dick Mc Kee did most of the organising---Collins Inteligence dept provided some of the names and addresses but the Dublin Brigade provided most

    The killings of the agents were meant to coincide with the sabotaging of Liverpool docks and warehouses,Manchester power plants and London timber yards---The English part of the op was led by Rory O Connor---as a result of Dick Mulcahys office being raided and plans being captured only the Liverpool arson attacks went ahead

    A second cousin of Michael Davitt who worked for the dept of agriculture and was in Dublin to buy horses was shot dead having been mistaken for a British agent---

    Not all the men were intelligence agents some were just court martial officers
    The crown above the red hand is that of the O'Neill rulers of Ulster---not the Saxe-coborg gotha usurpers crown

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member Catalpa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Dublin West
    Posts
    10,302
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martin TYRONE
    Scouts in the spectator stand may have fired warning shots that military were aproaching--some say yes others say no and no one really knows

    Michael Collins got credit for planning it---he was part of it but it was a joint GHQ decision---Dick Mc Kee did most of the organising---Collins Inteligence dept provided some of the names and addresses but the Dublin Brigade provided most

    The killings of the agents were meant to coincide with the sabotaging of Liverpool docks and warehouses,Manchester power plants and London timber yards---The English part of the op was led by Rory O Connor---as a result of Dick Mulcahys office being raided and plans being captured only the Liverpool arson attacks went ahead

    A second cousin of Michael Davitt who worked for the dept of agriculture and was in Dublin to buy horses was shot dead having been mistaken for a British agent---

    Not all the men were intelligence agents some were just court martial officers
    Long overdue a fresh look. I once held in my hand a Mauser carried by one of the Hit Teams that day but the target could not be found!

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I've been doing some reading about this period in Irish history of late and a guy called Frank Teeling crops up occasionally as a member of "the Squad", if I recall correctly. Anyone know anything about him?

  5. #5

    Default Frank Teeling

    Frank Teeling was my great-great uncle. Hewas part of the squad of 22 which was sent to assasinate Lieutenant Angliss and Lieutenant Peel. He was wounded in a gun battle with the Auxilaries in the laneway outside the house and captured. He was sentenced to death in Kilmainham but escaped with two others.

    In his later life it appears he developed a drinking problem and killed a man-William Johnson. I asked around and none of my living relatives could remember ever being told this but I think it must be true as I have found many sites online stating this.

    Frank Teeling - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member merle haggard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by martin TYRONE View Post


    Michael Collins got credit for planning it--
    the british and his partisan supporters creditted him with everything under the sun . If you read the actual detailed accounts of the war youll find thats far from the case . His contribution as reagrds military operations was neglible , non existent in his own county - by far the most active - which barely received a single round from him .

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Clanrickard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last outpost of freedom
    Posts
    32,020
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by merle haggard View Post
    His contribution as reagrds military operations was neglible , .
    What a load of crap. even from you.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member merle haggard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    5,489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Clanrickard View Post
    What a load of crap. even from you.
    ah go on , tell us how the brits never knew what he looked like and how he cycled around central dublin like the emerald pimpernell in broad daylight on a daily basis for 3 years, all 6 foot 3 of him with the big head and jaws . Never get tired of listening to that one .

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member Rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    8,543
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by walrusgumble View Post
    read books written by tom barry and earney o'malley or michael hutchinsons book on the war. many country brigades resented the ghq and often considered some as mere pun pushers , eg richard mulcahy (unfairly). at time ghq could not given general orders or plans, intitatives or goals. many country brigades had to be self sufficent. this carry on is one small example of why certain brigades went to the anti treaty side during the civil war.

    people like ginger o'connell and even eoin o'duffy (eeeek - even then he was very dellusioned and enjoyed a high opinion of himself)

    no one is trying to derride collins in any way, he had alot going on be it in his position in the irb,ira, volunteers, dail, minister for finance, the loans scheme etc. but meggard is simply saying there were many fine men working under him who dont get the credit they diserve, particularly men like dick mckee - his lost was a heavy one for the dublin brigade
    While admitting the problems you list Tom Barry in particular is very complimentary of Collins, Mulcahy and HQ in general.

    It wasn’t the type of war where HQ could command things and they didn’t have the resources themselves to give to others. Collins, Mulcahy etc. did most of their work in Dublin, which was obviously crucial to the WOI.

    The IRA would never have been successful as it was without the work of HQ and they wouldn’t be as successful without the local commanders (Lynch, Barry, MacEoin etc.) and the brigade’s around the country.
    "Give us the future, we've had enough of YOUR past, Give us back our country, to live in, to grow in and to love..."

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    121
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    While it's true that many who worked under Collins haven't received the recognition they deserved for it, this was hardly Collins's fault. He himself never stinted praise where he thought it was due, any more than he held back criticism when he thought that was merited.

    He was seized on as the public face of the movement and even lionised in Britain at the time of the Treaty talks. His early death cast him in the sort of martyr role the public love - the "Lost Leader". And then the Dublin Brigade made itself pretty unpopular among Republican forces during the Civil War, particularly after Collins was shot, and with the Free State afterwards, so few with that background were going to be hailed as heroes by either of the two sets of hucksters who inherited the shop.

Page 1 of 13 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •