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Thread: Report calls for extension of household recycling

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    Politics.ie Member TheBear's Avatar
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    Default Report calls for extension of household recycling

    From Ireland.com:
    • Figures released today show that household recycling rates in different local authority areas vary from as low as 7.2 per cent in Cork city to a high of 56 per cent in Galway city.

      The figures are included in the Joint Oireachtas Committee for Environment and Local Government's third report on household recycling published today.

      The report has made a number of recommendations on how recycling levels can be increased.
    There's a link to the report itself here. The table with the data on recycling, broken down by local authority, is on pages 12 and 13 of the report (pages 17 and 18 of the pdf file).

    The priority recommendations made in the report cover:
    - plastic waste
    - organic waste
    - provision of recycling facilities
    - newsprint industry, and
    - packaging waste

    It's a long report (they always are...), but what I've read of it is quite interesting, and the writing isn't too stodgy or anything like that.
    Heavy words are so lightly thrown.

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    Default Re: Report calls for extension of household recycling

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBear
    From Ireland.com:[i][list] Figures released today show that household recycling rates in different local authority areas vary from as low as 7.2 per cent in Cork city to a high of 56 per cent in Galway city.
    Personally I thought some places would have been lower than 7.2 percent and I never would have dreamt that anywhere in Ireland had reached 50% yet(as positive a thing as that is).

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    Thanks for the link.

    Recycling as it presently exists is not the answer, or at least it is an over-rated answer. Reduction is the only way. We consume far more than our fair share of resources. But we all know that nothing will be done to reduce waste while ever we have the intransigent Roche at the helm.

    His answer is: burn it and to hell with you! There are jobs and profits on the line if you reduce waste!
    We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when creating them

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    Politics.ie Member TheBear's Avatar
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    Have I whinged at you guys before about Tesco's efforts at reducing packaging?

    For example, they sell two packages of sugar snap peas. One is in that little plastic box thingummy, with cellophane around it. The other is a little plastic bag. Same amount in it, and same price. The plastic bag consists of maybe 5% of the plastic when compared to the box.

    They're clearly giving the option of cutting down on waste, so why not just eliminate the box!? They're making the bags anyway... Also, why restrict this to one or two products? Why not extend it throughout their fruit and veg range?
    Heavy words are so lightly thrown.

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    TB: I cheerfully direct you to a truly excellent open letter from George Monbiot to 'Sir' Terry Leahy, chief executive of Tesco.

    Enjoy
    We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when creating them

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    just had a brief skim through the document. why did only some local authorities report?

    also, i see Jackie Healy Rea is the deputy chair of the oireachtas environment committee. whoever put him there obviously had a great sense of irony.
    "Nixon is PRO-WAR and PRO-FAMILY" - Nixion's head (Futurama)

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    I've had a quick skim through the report and am surprised at the number of times it refers to reduction in the production of waste, given that they were supposed to be reporting on recycling. Reduction of use of resources is contrary to promoting growth in the eyes of top knobs.

    For me, it wasn't mentioned half often enough. We have no right to consume more than our fair share of resources of this world.

    And remember, the hierarchy is reduce, reuse, recyle. In other words, recycle comes last. (Actually, when all three fail, landfill comes last).

    I got short shrift when I wrote to the government about deposit schemes and how it would improve the countryside for tourism purposes and cut our energy bill if done properly. Good to see it recommended in this report.

    However, with our current incumbents, does this report mean anything at all? Well, maybe. Roche has already taken a very very small step away from total commitment to incineration across Ireland, as intimated in the following:

    Waste regulator could be in place next year

    A regulator for the waste-management industry is being considered by Government and may be appointed as early as the beginning of next year, it has emerged. The regulator's job would be to bring standards to the very different levels of collection and recycling across the industry, which is operated by local authorities and private sector companies.
    ...

    Mr Haughey also criticised what he claimed was the inclusion of incineration in the State's eight waste-management plans, a feature he described as "irrational".
    ...

    However, Mr Roche defended the regional plans saying that they were subject to constant review. In relation to the prospect of eight incinerators, he said: "The truth is we've none. Maybe when we have one or two we can talk about what the ultimate number should be."
    ...

    Mr Roche said he would be receiving the report of the consultation body in early October and would comment further at that time.
    ...

    Waste to energy: Particular attention should be paid to a review of the State's waste-management plans.

    Emphasis should be placed on the hierarchy which promotes avoidance, reuse and recycling over disposal.

    Tim O'Brien
    © The Irish Times
    'Irrational' plan for network of incinerators likely to be binned

    PROPOSALS for eight regional incinerators across the country look set to be binned after a Government minister admitted we do not need that many. The controversial plans form part of regional waste management plans - all eight of which propose an incinerator. Yesterday, Environment Minister Dick Roche acknowledged Ireland needed "some", but probably not eight incinerators.

    He was commenting as Fianna Fail TD Sean Haughey, who chairs a powerful Oireachtas committee, described the plan for eight incinerators as "simply irrational".

    Launching a Joint Committee on the Environment report on household waste recycling yesterday - which found "remarkable" variations between local authorities recycling efforts - Mr Haughey said he accepted that incineration had a part to play in the management of residual waste. "But the prospect of having eight incinerators is not sensible environmental policy." He called for a complete review of all eight regional waste management plans.

    ...
    Fergus Black
    © Irish Independent
    With proper control over what enters the waste stream in the first place, incinerators are redundant.
    We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when creating them

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    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
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    Things have clearly improved quite significantly over the last decade. We're recycling more and producing less waste per capita.

    Ireland triples recyling of municipal waste - Environmental News | The Irish Times - Wed, Mar 20, 2013

    I was looking at the actual report yesterday and weirdly, some of the Nordic countries have gone backwards and are now recycling less.
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

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    Politics.ie Member Nemesiscorporation's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shqiptar View Post
    Things have clearly improved quite significantly over the last decade. We're recycling more and producing less waste per capita.

    Ireland triples recyling of municipal waste - Environmental News | The Irish Times - Wed, Mar 20, 2013

    I was looking at the actual report yesterday and weirdly, some of the Nordic countries have gone backwards and are now recycling less.
    Which Nordic country are you referring to?

    Sweden and Denmark are recycling more than ever.

    Sweden is actually being paid to take waste from the UK, which it is making a fortune out of. Right now about half the energy created in the communal water heating facility which heats my apartment is from UK waste.

    Sweden is also exporting a lot of metals from recycling to China.

    All rubbish in Sweden is sorted for recycling, composting, fuel, metals, etc. Any kommune that did not do so, would be in real trouble.

    Norway recycles everything that it can as well.

    It is good to see Ireland recycling some. However Ireland needs to get its act together and recycle everything it can, compost as much as possible, extract as much metal as possible, etc. Ireland has come a long way, but still has a very long way to go.

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    Politics.ie Member Baztard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nemesiscorporation View Post
    Which Nordic country are you referring to?

    Sweden and Denmark are recycling more than ever.

    Sweden is actually being paid to take waste from the UK, which it is making a fortune out of. Right now about half the energy created in the communal water heating facility which heats my apartment is from UK waste.

    Sweden is also exporting a lot of metals from recycling to China.

    All rubbish in Sweden is sorted for recycling, composting, fuel, metals, etc. Any kommune that did not do so, would be in real trouble.

    Norway recycles everything that it can as well.

    It is good to see Ireland recycling some. However Ireland needs to get its act together and recycle everything it can, compost as much as possible, extract as much metal as possible, etc. Ireland has come a long way, but still has a very long way to go.
    When the water charges come in does anyone seriously expect that people will then waste precious water and money washing out tins, jars, plastic bottles and containers. I don't think so. All we will see is an increase on black bin waste or else contminated green recyclables which end up in landfill. The future is looking dirty, incineration with energy recovery and district heating is the answer! honest.

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