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Thread: Tourism Numbers

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    Politics.ie Member liamfoley's Avatar
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    Default Tourism Numbers

    Posting this under 'Economy' because of the effects it must have on the economy. Is it because we are too expensive or a consequence of the worldwide downturn? Or is there another reason, exchange rates etc (at least for the USA). Or maybe blame the weather? Visitor numbers drop sharply - The Irish Times - Tue, Jul 14, 2009
    The truthiness will set you free! - Stephen Colbert.

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    Those are quite scary numbers, ~ 20% down for the biggest markets. Britain dropping may be due to the abnormally weakened sterling (although that is changing), but the Euro drop is alarming.

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    Costs,
    Perception of product.
    Weather the past few seasons.
    Worldwide economic difficulty.
    Older visitors with a connection dying out.
    Would be the main problems.
    Its only a chat, we ain't the world council.

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    Politics.ie Member liamfoley's Avatar
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    I think we must be pricing ourselves out of the market for the lower to mid end of the market, I mean why would people pay the prices they do? Irish charm only counts for so much.
    The truthiness will set you free! - Stephen Colbert.

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    2,667,500 visitors from abroad is still damned good considering the kind of overpriced, bad service that still dominates here. But the numbers will keep continue going down, and I'd imagine much more sharply from now on. It's amazing how many businesses, in particular restaurants/cafes, have no strategy to hold customers by offering good value deals. Or maybe not so amazing really.

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    Ireland is a rip off. I wouldnt come here.

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    Good article here, sums it up really.

    “The Celtic Tiger was no friend to tourism,” says Jim Deegan of Railtours Ireland. “We became too busy; tourism slid down the pecking order. Tourists were only getting in the way of us getting in the way of ourselves – whether it was roads, airports or public transport. We started losing the welcome. We were meeting customers who were saying ‘You’re the first Irish we’ve met’. Now you see people going out of their way because they’re appreciative again.”

    On the issue of the frosty fáilte, Shaun Quinn believes “it was partly because more international staff were being employed, but there was also an age factor. Women who were working in the home and wanted a part-time job in the industry were fantastic, even if their confidence was a bit low. Where you had teenagers or younger employees, that’s where you got the frosty fáilte. Maybe we all needed a jolt.”

    It's all smiles as 'Ireland of the welcomes' reopens for business - The Irish Times - Sat, May 02, 2009

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    Kind of tells us what people come to Ireland for, not our world class museums or scenery but to meet the Irish,
    The truthiness will set you free! - Stephen Colbert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Staropramen View Post
    Good article here, sums it up really.

    “The Celtic Tiger was no friend to tourism,” says Jim Deegan of Railtours Ireland. “We became too busy; tourism slid down the pecking order. Tourists were only getting in the way of us getting in the way of ourselves – whether it was roads, airports or public transport. We started losing the welcome. We were meeting customers who were saying ‘You’re the first Irish we’ve met’. Now you see people going out of their way because they’re appreciative again.”

    On the issue of the frosty fáilte, Shaun Quinn believes “it was partly because more international staff were being employed, but there was also an age factor. Women who were working in the home and wanted a part-time job in the industry were fantastic, even if their confidence was a bit low. Where you had teenagers or younger employees, that’s where you got the frosty fáilte. Maybe we all needed a jolt.”

    It's all smiles as 'Ireland of the welcomes' reopens for business - The Irish Times - Sat, May 02, 2009
    In many other European countries, it is normal to see older people employed in the food/drink sectors. It is seen as a profession, not a part-time job for students

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluter View Post
    In many other European countries, it is normal to see older people employed in the food/drink sectors. It is seen as a profession, not a part-time job for students
    Its not a profession here in Ireland, it is a vocation. If you dont love it, find another career.

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