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View Poll Results: Should Irish be compulsory in schools?

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Thread: Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish

  1. #1
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    Default Soaring numbers of pupils give up on Irish

    THE number of pupils opting out of studying Irish in schools is rocketing.

    More from Independent.ie

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member FutureTaoiseach's Avatar
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    It should remain compulsory but thought in the Gaelscoil-method, which is more effective. I hated Irish classes in secondary-school, not out of a dislike of the language, but rather because we had grammar rammed down our throats rather than spoken Irish.

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    Politics.ie Member Aindriu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FutureTaoiseach View Post
    It should remain compulsory but thought in the Gaelscoil-method, which is more effective. I hated Irish classes in secondary-school, not out of a dislike of the language, but rather because we had grammar rammed down our throats rather than spoken Irish.
    I agree. It should be taught as a living language not as a second language like French is for example
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    The bigger news in that article is that some Educational Psychologists are clearly making false claims about children having learning disabilities. If they are incapable of learning Irish then they should be incapable of learning another language.

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    Politics.ie Member Darren Mac an Phríora's Avatar
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    Most of the kids opting out of it are foreign nationals/the kids of foreign nationals who did not start their early or all of their primary/secondary education in Ireland.

    And the question is not good. Virtually everyone is in favour of Irish being taught up until Junior Cert. The argument has been for Leaving Cert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aindriu View Post
    not as a second language like French is for example
    I disagree on that point. I should be taught as a second language like French, Germand etc. because for over 90% of students it is a second language. The problem I had with the teaching of Irish is that we were only introduced to the fact that the language has declensions in fifth year. When you're learning German or Latin, that is the first thing you're told about. The Irish syllabus seems stuck between an aspiration to have the language on an equal level with English and the reality that it is a "foreign" language for the vast majority who learn it.

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    In its current form, Irish should not be made compulsory. The method of teaching Irish for the most part is not working.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member KingKane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaudrillardNeverExisted View Post
    I disagree on that point. I should be taught as a second language like French, Germand etc. because for over 90% of students it is a second language. The problem I had with the teaching of Irish is that we were only introduced to the fact that the language has declensions in fifth year. When you're learning German or Latin, that is the first thing you're told about. The Irish syllabus seems stuck between an aspiration to have the language on an equal level with English and the reality that it is a "foreign" language for the vast majority who learn it.
    They should split it for Leaving Cert into two subjects, one with a focus on speaking and writing it. The other as a literature course. And get rid of the 10% marks bonus. We don't cover English grammar for the Leaving Cert it is assumed but we need to do it for Irish as we don't speak it every day.
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    Quote Originally Posted by KingKane View Post
    They should split it for Leaving Cert into two subjects, one with a focus on speaking and writing it. The other as a literature course. And get rid of the 10% marks bonus. We don't cover English grammar for the Leaving Cert it is assumed but we need to do it for Irish as we don't speak it every day.
    And this will really tell us how many students - and parents - are really lovers of the language

  10. #10

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    Agree with King Kane and Baudrillard.As KK says Irish should be taught as two subjects-Language for non speakers and Literature for Gaeltacht kids.It's a nonsense learning the conditional 6 months before the exam.Wouldn't be allowed on the French or German course.So Baudrillard is spot on also,teach it as a foreign language in the Galltacht,which it is.Lots of foreign born kids learn it well,so its not like it's uniquely difficult.

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