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Thread: America Awash With Painkillers & Drug Addicts

  1. #81
    Politics.ie Member fat finger's Avatar
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    The opiate abuse scandal switched to Britain this week with the news that thousands of patients in NHS hospitals have been killed off through overdosing on opium based pain killers and the spectre that one doctor in particular in Hampshire presided over the death of over 600 of her patients. 600 men and women dead, who entered hospital in many cases for routine treatment and expected to be quickly back with their families. But now dead.
    The medical establishment has been quick to fight back, blaming a particular type of syringe as responsible for the deaths, but ignoring the fact that many of the dead were in no pain and required no injections for pain relief.
    Here in Ireland it is known that the type of syringe was only banned in 2014 which leaves users of the HSE asking, what led to it being banned and how many people here died prematurely because doctors were over prescribing opiate based pain relief for patients who were not in any pain?

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    The story of Purdue, the Sackler family and the marketing of Librium, Valium, MS Contin and ultimately OxyContin is well worth a read:

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...empire-of-pain

    From its own research and clinical reports pouring in from physicians, Purdue knew the unlikely yarn about OxyContin being less addictive than other opioids was false but persisted in this malicious lie for years.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/29/h...oxycontin.html

    Thousands of deaths (more than 200,000 in the US alone) and billions of profit later, three senior executives were sentenced to community service. That seems a trifle lenient in a country where you can do years of hard time for sharing drugs with one person who overdoses:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/25/u...ion-crime.html
    Last edited by Ardillaun; 25th June 2018 at 08:12 AM.

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    Here are some recommendations for pain management after common surgical procedures that are specific on the maximum number of opioid pills that patients going home should be given:

    https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/29ca8...es%202.15.docx

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/o...llection=Fixes

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    What do we know about the Purdue family ?

    How could they have such contempt for their fellow man ?

    .................................................. ..........................

    Is the Purdue family essentially of the most maligned ethnicity [ White / Caucasian ] PLUS religion [ Christianity, vis. Catholic ] ?
    IF ANSWER IS NO, .... ;

    WHAT IS THE SPECIFIC ETHNICITY [ Please do NOT be curtailed by Census parameters ] OF THE PURDUE FAMILY ?

    WHAT IS THEIR RELIGION [ or religion traditional to their ancestry ] ?

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    There are a lot of junkies on the Trump Hating threads here. They tend also to be green lefties.

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    Politics.ie Member PAGE61's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valamhic View Post
    There are a lot of junkies on the Trump Hating threads here. They tend also to be green lefties.
    A bit of a general and pointed statement to make ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by valamhic View Post
    There are a lot of junkies on the Trump Hating threads here. They tend also to be green lefties.
    This decades-old story has very little to do with Mr. Trump.

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    Here's an excellent article focusing on how North American doctors were misled by wishful thinking and shoddy research into giving massive doses of opioids to patients:

    The making of an opioid epidemic | News | The Guardian

    Portenoy toured the country, describing opioids as a gift from nature and promoting access to narcotics as a moral argument. Being pain-free was a human right, he said. In 1993, he told the New York Times of a “growing literature showing that these drugs can be used for a long time, with few side-effects, and that addiction and abuse are not a problem”.

    Long after the epidemic took hold, and the death toll rose into the hundreds of thousands in the US, Portenoy admitted that there was little basis for this claim and that he had been more interested in changing attitudes to opioids among doctors than in scientific rigour.

    “In essence, this was education to destigmatise and because the primary goal was to destigmatise, we often left evidence behind,” he admitted years later as the scale of the epidemic unfolded.

    Likewise, Haddox’s theory of pseudo-addiction was based on the study of a single cancer patient. At the time, though, the new thinking was a liberation for primary care doctors frustrated at the limited help they could offer patients begging to get a few hours’ sleep. Ballantyne was as enthusiastic as anyone and began teaching the gospel of pain relief at Harvard, and embracing opioids to treat her patients.

    “Our message was a message of hope,” she said. “We were teaching that we shouldn’t withhold opiates from people suffering from chronic pain and that the risks of addiction were pretty low because that was the teaching we’d received.”

    But then Ballantyne began to see signs in her patients that experience wasn’t matching theory. Doctors were told they could repeatedly ratchet up the dosage of narcotics and switch to a new and powerful drug, OxyContin, without endangering the patient, because the pain, in effect, cancelled out the risk of addiction. To her dismay, Ballantyne saw that many of her patients were not better off when taking the drugs and were showing signs of dependence.

    Among those patients on high doses over months and years, Ballantyne heard from one after another that the more drugs they took, the worse their pain became. But if they tried to stop or cut back on the pills, their pain also worsened. They were trapped.

    “You had never seen people in such agony as these people on high doses of opiates,” she told me. “And we thought it’s not just because of the underlying pain; it’s to do with the medication.”
    When conscientious researchers began to do proper research on the emerging problem, their results were ignored for a long time:

    Lucas and Ledgerwood visited trauma centres to collect data on deaths before and after the joint commission standards on pain treatment. In 2007, the two doctors published their findings. Before the commission’s dictum, 0.7% of trauma centre patients died from “excess administration of pain medicines”. The death toll rose to 3.6% after the commission’s policies kicked in.

    The two doctors made no secret of who they blamed for “this preventable cause of death and disability”. “It’s about money. Money has influence, and it influenced the joint commission,” said Lucas.

    The surgeon presented the paper to a meeting of the Central Surgical Association and saw it published by the Journal of the American College of Surgeons under the headline “Kindness Kills: The Negative Impact of Pain as the Fifth Vital Sign.”

    Afterwards, Lucas got a stream of letters and emails from doctors who recognised the problem. But, unlike Ballantyne, he wasn’t surprised when the policy remained the same. “Did I expect a change? No. It is too ingrained into the medical profession. It’s become financial just like the drug industry is financial. It’s nothing to do with right or wrong. It’s about how the money flows,” he said. “When you write a paper you want there to be unemotional data out there. You want that unemotional data to be analysed and interpreted in one way or the other, but you don’t expect the Renaissance.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by fat finger View Post
    Why back pain especially?
    Just to expand a little on what I said earlier, the problem of dangerously escalating dose and diminishing benefit does not arise with terminal cancer patients. A close relative of mine with a dreadful wasting disease had his death mercifully hastened by opioids but he had no good days left at all. That’s the challenge with opioids in back pain and even more with adolescent dental surgery - you run the risk of cutting healthy and useful lives short in their prime, or even before that because anybody under the age of 25 can become addicted much more quickly. This loss is already being seen in US life expectancy figures.

    Americans and Canadians have an odd need to talk about their bowels but these ads were a new frontier for me in such discussions:

    Bizarre Opioid-Induced Constipation Super Bowl 50 commercial | Daily Mail Online

    Twitter
    Last edited by Ardillaun; 10th November 2018 at 07:15 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardillaun View Post
    They should be used with great caution in back pain.
    It is a real problem

    I have suffered from severe, chronic back pain all my adult life as a result of a spinal injury

    I cannot take any of the normal anti-inflammatory painkillers because of an allergy

    When the pain was very severe I begged my doctor for something

    He prescribed Tramadol

    It was like taking heroin---euphoria, dependence, feelings of terror and paranoia if my supply was running low

    After a few months on the drug, my pain got worse and the drug itself seemed ineffective

    I resolved to wean myself off it. I succeeded with great difficulty after a year or so

    I still struggle with the pain.

    But anything is better than being imprisoned in the nightmare of dependency---it was a terrible time

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