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Thread: Air France jet crashes with 228 on board.

  1. #1

    Default Air France jet crashes with 228 on board.

    An Air France jet from Rio to Paris appears to have crashed.

    It was carrying 228 people on board when it disappeared off Radar at 0600 GMT.

    BBC NEWS | Americas | French plane 'missing off Brazil'
    Last edited by odie1kanobe; 1st June 2009 at 12:27 PM.

  2. #2
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    Nothing confirmed yet that I am aware of. Just that it has disappeared off the radar screen.

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    Politics.ie Member mothball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kerrynorth View Post
    Nothing confirmed yet that I am aware of. Just that it has disappeared off the radar screen.
    It disappeared over five hours ago. There's not many places it could have gone.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by kerrynorth View Post
    Nothing confirmed yet that I am aware of. Just that it has disappeared off the radar screen.
    Unfortunately it was many hours ago and nothing has been picked up by any Air Traffic Control along the route.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hewson View Post
    The attempt at humour is hardly appropriate in the circumstances, is it?
    Fair enough,point taken.

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    Is this the first Airbus A330 to be lost in such circumstances? Until the facts are clear, it surely casts doubt on the whole ETOPS (Extended Twin Operations, aka Engines Turn or Passengers Swim) regime?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by FakeViking View Post
    Is this the first Airbus A330 to be lost in such circumstances? Until the facts are clear, it surely casts doubt on the whole ETOPS (Extended Twin Operations, aka Engines Turn or Passengers Swim) regime?
    Read a good book by an air-crash investigation guy, name escapes me, who said it was only a matter of time before a twin-engined jet goes down in mid-atlantic. That incident in the Hudson would have turned out very different trying to land on a choppy sea.

    EDIT: was FINAL CALL by Stephen Barlay, very critical of the coming together of de-regulation and the use of twin-engined jets over oceans and deserts.

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    Its not looking good for the plane and her passengers as it was supposed to land at 11.10............. Lets keep our fingers crossed for all on board but its not looking good.
    'This life is not a dress rehearsal, we only get one shot at today'

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by FakeViking View Post
    Is this the first Airbus A330 to be lost in such circumstances? Until the facts are clear, it surely casts doubt on the whole ETOPS (Extended Twin Operations, aka Engines Turn or Passengers Swim) regime?
    Wikipedia's list of A330 incidents doest show anything similar. Apart from this incident where they got lucky:

    On 24 August 2001, Air Transat, Flight 236, an A330-243, performed the world's longest recorded glide with a jet airliner after suffering fuel exhaustion over the Atlantic Ocean. The plane flew powerless for half an hour and covered 65 nautical miles (120 km) to an emergency landing in the Azores (Portugal). No one was hurt, but the aircraft suffered some structural damage and blown tires.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by slartibartfast View Post
    Wikipedia's list of A330 incidents doest show anything similar. Apart from this incident where they got lucky:

    On 24 August 2001, Air Transat, Flight 236, an A330-243, performed the world's longest recorded glide with a jet airliner after suffering fuel exhaustion over the Atlantic Ocean. The plane flew powerless for half an hour and covered 65 nautical miles (120 km) to an emergency landing in the Azores (Portugal). No one was hurt, but the aircraft suffered some structural damage and blown tires.
    That was as a result of poor maintenance.

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