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Thread: The Art of Politics

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    Default The Art of Politics

    A few days back, Nina Khrushcheva (teacher of international affairs at New School University in New York and great-granddaughter of Nikita Khrushchev) wrote an article in The Financial Times in which she laid out how art and culture portrays the political reality more readily and accurately than anything else.

    Her case is Russia, but we might look towards the more familiar US as an example. After the stockmarket crash of 1929, the more upbeat genres that produced Gentlemen prefer blondes and The Private Life of Cleopatra (though initially published in 1930, it was the product of an earlier age), gave way to the more fearful styles of Detective novels, King Kong and the reproduction of The War of the Worlds. Projecting forwards, before and in the initial stages of the Iraq war we had such imperialistic and triumphalist works as Troy, Alexander and Kingdom of Heaven. However, in the more recent music releases, as the war has soured, I have heard about three songs concerning the Vietnam war- whether it be about the draft, death or injury sustained therein.

    Indeed, the most politically exciting years in Irish History of late- pivoting around the turn of the eighteenth to nineteenth century- were the same years that produced Wilde's, Joyce's, Yeats' (JB & WB), Shaw's, O'Casey's, Clarke's and etc.'s most exciting works.

    Do people think there is a genuine connection, and if so what might we see perceive of politics today?
    We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the internet, we know this is not true.

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    I'm surprised you never mentioned Captain Planet and the rise of the Greens in Germany.
    The standard of excellence is an infinite suggestiveness, naturalism is the one thing to be condemned.

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    Or the Cold War and Roger Ramjet. Alas, not everything can be included in a single post.

    Now everyone together: to the tune of Yankee Doodle (and is that really the state anthem of Connecticut?)-

    Roger Ramjet and his Eagles
    Fighting for our freedom
    Fly through in and outer space
    Not to join 'em, but to beat 'em

    Roger Ramjet, he's our man
    Hero of our nation
    For his adventure just be sure
    And Stay Tuned to this station

    When Ramjet takes his Proton Pill
    The crooks begin to worry
    They can't escape their awful fate
    From Proton's mighty fury

    Roger Ramjet, he's our man
    Hero of our nation
    For his adventure just be sure
    And Stay Tuned to this station

    So come and join us all you kids
    For lots of fun and laughter
    As Roger Ramjet and his men
    Get all those crooks they're after

    Roger Ramjet, he's our man
    Hero of our nation
    For his adventures just be sure
    And Stay Tuned to this station
    We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the internet, we know this is not true.

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    Default Re: The Art of Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by St Disibod
    Indeed, the most politically exciting years in Irish History of late- pivoting around the turn of the eighteenth to nineteenth century- were the same years that produced Wilde's, Joyce's, Yeats' (JB & WB), Shaw's, O'Casey's, Clarke's and etc.'s most exciting works.

    Do people think there is a genuine connection, and if so what might we see perceive of politics today?
    The elite of Hollywood and the music industry chasing the dollar is one aspect of popular art responding to current events but there is nothing profound about that.

    If Holloywood was to do the equivalent of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, in a big budget movie confronting for example, the issue of the typical American worker losing out on the American Dream while the top tier take most of the cream, then it would be news.

    It's rare to have a movie like High Noon (1952), which actor John Wayne termed “the most un-American thing I’ve ever seen in my whole life”!

    Beyond, commercial driven art, there are films being made and books written that confront the status quo, but with a limited audience.

    Modern art mainly comprises soap operas and banal TV programme formats that are unashamedly imitated across the globe, if they show any audience appeal.
    Believe those who search for truth. Doubt those who claim to have found it -André Gide (1869-1951) Nobel Laureate 1947

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    Default Re: The Art of Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelHennigan
    If Holloywood was to do the equivalent of Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, in a big budget movie confronting for example, the issue of the typical American worker losing out on the American Dream while the top tier take most of the cream, then it would be news.
    They tried in that film, The Assassination of Richard Nixon. Awful stuff altogether. I suppose you need to combine substance with style, as Arthur Miller did.

    But the point of art should be representation- I'm not into abstraction for abstraction's sake. There's very little reason for the Hollywood elite to focus upon the difficulty of the American dream- that would be playing to the gallery. If Hollywood were to do it, you would have someone who looks like Kate Moss playing the poor traveller girl. They are the elite through success and it should be no suprise they focus upon that.

    Novels and plays will always represent the poorer element of society better because novelists and playwrights tend not to live the glitzy lifestyle.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dee Four
    I'm surprised you never mentioned Captain Planet and the rise of the Greens in Germany.
    The Smoggies really deserve the credit.

    Smoggies, Smoggies,
    Smoky, oily, greasy...
    Have you met the Smoggies?
    We love the soot and grime,
    We make the whole world dirty,
    And we have a real good time.
    We love to make things messy,
    Just as dirty as can be,
    And you can bet we'll mess you up
    Ecologically.

    Suntots, Suntots,
    Earth and wind and sea...
    We use the water, wind and sun,
    To make our homes and gadgets run,
    Where else can you have such fun,
    Environmentally?


    Sesame Street, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles when they had pupils, that show were they strapped guns to dinosaurs, kids just aren't getting an education anymore. What the hell is Pokémon going to teach you?
    We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the internet, we know this is not true.

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    Quote Originally Posted by St Disibod
    The Smoggies really deserve the credit.
    You've been listening to Ray D'Arcy, haven't you?


    Quote Originally Posted by St Disibod
    What the hell is Pokémon going to teach you?
    The 'must have' mentality that is essential to survive in this consumerist world without people thinking there is something wrong with you. You absolutely have to "catch 'em all" or you are some sort of social retard who lacks the necessary skills to conform.

    On another level it represents the globalisation of world culture. It has managed to gain world wide success because it appeals to those among us who are least concerned with cultural heritage: the kids. Children are more or less the same the world over. It is worrying from a diversity stand point to think that children across the world are now being fed the same message through our globalised mass media.
    The standard of excellence is an infinite suggestiveness, naturalism is the one thing to be condemned.

  7. #7

    Default

    [quote=Dee Four]
    Quote Originally Posted by "St Disibod":3qb7hwhg
    What the hell is Pokémon going to teach you?
    The 'must have' mentality that is essential to survive in this consumerist world without people thinking there is something wrong with you. You absolutely have to "catch 'em all" or you are some sort of social retard who lacks the necessary skills to conform.

    On another level it represents the globalisation of world culture. It has managed to gain world wide success because it appeals to those among us who are least concerned with cultural heritage: the kids. Children are more or less the same the world over. It is worrying from a diversity stand point to think that children across the world are now being fed the same message through our globalised mass media.[/quote:3qb7hwhg]

    Also, the normalisation of slavery.
    Failed liberal traitors: http://cedarlounge.wordpress.com

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    I rememebr coming across an interesting article once that tracked the development of modern society from Seasme Street to Barney and Friends.

    In Seasme Street (I'm pretty sure I don't need to tell the poster of p.ie this) the childern interacted with characters on the Street, including a homeless grumpy guy who lived in a trash can. Generations mixed freely. The focus was on the community and society values.

    'Freindly neighbours and the air is clean'

    The action in Bareny takes place within a closed community. A safe after- school play group with limited inaction between children and thier eleders. Here the focus is on the individual.

    'I love you, you love me'

    Interesting stuff.
    "Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative."
    Oscar Wilde

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    [quote=Dee Four]
    Quote Originally Posted by "St Disibod":3797it3j
    The Smoggies really deserve the credit.
    You've been listening to Ray D'Arcy, haven't you?[/quote:3797it3j]
    I can't sneak anything past you, can I?

    Quote Originally Posted by eurocrat
    I rememebr coming across an interesting article once that tracked the development of modern society from Seasme Street to Barney and Friends.
    The Simpsons through to Friends is also quite telling. From a local town, family based comedy to the metropolitan promiscuity of six people whose friendship seems largely based on Warner Brothers' profit margin.

    But then we should be wary of such analysis. Anyone remember who said this: ""The nation needs to be closer to the Waltons than the Simpsons." I think popular culture won that round.
    We've all heard that a million monkeys banging on a million typewriters will eventually reproduce the entire works of Shakespeare. Now, thanks to the internet, we know this is not true.

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    Default Re: The Art of Politics

    Quote Originally Posted by St Disibod
    Do people think there is a genuine connection, and if so what might we see perceive of politics today?
    Here's a recent work by Robert Ballagh that testifies to the continuing interaction between art and politics in contemporary Ireland:

    Seán a' Chóta
    "Níl ach líon beag fear ar aithne againn, agus líon mór cótaí is brístí." Thoreau

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