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Thread: Ulster-Scots: a language or a dialect

  1. #1
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    Default Ulster-Scots: a language or a dialect

    http://www.ulsterscotsagency.com/home.asp

    I came across the Ulster Scots agency website and listened to the audio files which sounded to me like some weird form of English

    The question
    Is Ulster Scots a language of its own or just a dialect of English


    THE SECOND HAN COMPUTER

    The weans sez, get a computer Da,
    So we can gw' on the net,
    Sez I ye'll hae tae wait a wee,
    They micht get chaper yet,

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    I heard on a television programme a good while ago that it (quite uniquely) can be regarded as both a language and a dialect, having met the standard characteristics of both. It does, apparently, qualify as a language

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    It's English spoken in a Ballymena accent, heavily sprinkled with local colloquialisms like "thran", "fornenst" etc - many of which are used across the north.

    It's like saying traditional Dublinese should be considered a "language" because it's a distinct accent heavily sprinkled with colloqualisms like "mot", "childer" and "gaf".
    Je suis un loo-lah

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    All human communication is language of course, but as far as Ulster-Scots goes it is a dialect of English. It's very close to lowland scots, the language of Burns, for which no claim is made for it being anything other than an English dialect.

    However, there's probably little point in waving issues of language status around. If throwing a few euros its way keps the crazies quiet, then it's probably money well spent.

  5. #5

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    If its a dialect its more of Scot's Gaelic, or Irish, that it is of English. However, it needs money to promote itself and coin new terminology and words. Hence it borrows a lot from English. It would make more sense linguistically and historically to borrow them from Irish or Scot's Gaelic.

    That there is any demand for the promotion of Ulster Scots, outside of a handful of people within the Unionist community, remains to be seen a mon avis.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sean1
    If its a dialect its more of Scot's Gaelic, or Irish, that it is of English. .
    Your totally wrong its orgins are English (Germanic) it has no connection to Scots-Gaelic or Irish which are Celtic. Some of it can actually be understood through english

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marx
    Some of it can actually be understood through english
    All of it can be understood "through English" as long as you're used to thick rural Ulster accents and know rural Ulster slang.

    This linguistic feat is possible, amazingly enough, because "Ulster-Scots" is, well, English as she is spake in rural Ulster.
    Je suis un loo-lah

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    its not a language or a dialect its a joke

    apperently road sign in Ulster Scots were painted above the English language version in parts of East Belfast - the next day loyalists had scrubbed them out thinking they were as gaeilge

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    I found a website for a body called the Ulster-Scots Agency. HereLiam Logan takes a wry look at Ulster-Scots words and phrases and their often humourous meanings.

    Including:

    You say "potato", I say "proota"

    and, my favourite:

    Liam reveals it's better to be "ready for oot" than "ooty o the wie o".

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    There was an ad in the Belfast Telegraph a couple of years ago advertising the position of CEO of the Ulster Scots agency. The ad was printed in English and Ulster Scots. If you saw this ad, and compared the sober sounding English with the hilarious sounding Ulster-Scots, you'd certainly think that someone is taking the mick here.

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