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Thread: Cosc campaign - justifying having no male victims in ads

  1. #1
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    Default Cosc campaign - justifying having no male victims in ads

    (I meant to post this a few weeks ago but was busy with work. It's not that exciting but I wanted to get it off my chest)

    Earlier in the year, Cosc were running a campaign about domestic violence. It was talking about belittling words and emotional and verbal abuse. I mentioned on another forum that it occured to me that that would have been an opportunity to highlight the problem of men suffering domestic abuse as there was a collection of different radio ads. Each ad at one stage let the listener know it was a woman that was the victim. A woman agreed with me and suggested I follow it up which I did with a quick E-mail.

    I pointed out that there is a major problem with men underreporting the problem (a much smaller percentage than females) and could they not explicitly have a male "victim" (not exact word).

    I'm appending the reply. I find it a bit frustrating:
    "Cosc’s current campaign was developed on the basis of research which shows
    that in Ireland that domestic violence does not affect men and women
    equally. Research shows us that women suffer greater harm and fear than men
    as a result of domestic violence. These facts are reflected in the
    campaign."


    I don't see just because more women may suffer from a problem that one shouldn't point out to an ignorant general population that men can be victims.
    I'm not sure that principle would be acccepted in many other areas especially in the "equality" area.

    The level of harm and fear could be for debated.
    A man knows if he leaves (i) there are no refuges for him to go to; (ii) he may subsequently have little or no access to his children if they never get back together (iii) he may have to pay his partner a lot of money but not get to live in the dwelling, live with his children, etc so could sit it out (iv) feel more nervous about approaching a body for fear he will not get good support or may even get accused of abuse as I believe has happened. If not by the Gardai/others initially, by his partner later.

    -------------
    Thank you for your e-mail regarding our current awareness campaign 'Your
    Silence Feeds the Violence'.

    Cosc recognises that domestic abuse and sexual abuse are issues which
    tragically have male and female victims and perpetrators. We are actively
    trying to change attitudes to domestic and sexual abuse. We are working
    with groups supporting male and female victims to prevent these crimes and
    to ensure that all victims regardless of gender get the best possible
    response.

    This campaign takes a broad approach to the issue of domestic violence. It
    includes outdoor and online advertising that covers domestic violence
    against both men and women. The campaign also touches on the impact on
    children and older people. Our current campaign on domestic abuse is the
    first time that the issue of male victims has been included in a government
    campaign.

    Cosc’s current campaign was developed on the basis of research which shows
    that in Ireland that domestic violence does not affect men and women
    equally. Research shows us that women suffer greater harm and fear than men
    as a result of domestic violence. These facts are reflected in the
    campaign.

    The campaign headline is 'Your Silence Feeds the Violence’. The purpose of
    the campaign is to highlight the issue and to encourage people to consider
    how they might help someone (of either gender) they know. This is very
    clearly captured in the call to action which states 'If someone you know is
    a victim of domestic violence find out how to help at cosc.ie'. There is
    information on our website for both male and female victims of domestic
    violence.

    Cosc is clear that its remit includes both male and female victims of
    domestic violence and this is taken into account in all areas of our work.
    We appreciate you contacting us and assure you that all victims are a
    concern to Cosc. This will be reflected on the National Strategy which will
    be submitted to Government in the coming months.
    Last edited by belvoboy; 25th February 2009 at 12:45 AM.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member Thac0man's Avatar
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    I seem to remember a simluar response form the Rape Crises Centre regarding their ignoring of the problem of male/male rape. There is perhaps a case to made that such institutions, recieveing state funding, should be run by professionals, not activitists with a single gender agenda.

  3. #3

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    Get the equality authority after them. That should be an entertaining fight. Who do you think is the biggest victim?
    Liquidate labour, liquidate stocks, liquidate the farmers, liquidate real estate.

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    It's the remnants of the feminist era.

    Basically, it's social engineering masquerading as "womens' welfare".

  5. #5

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    you should read the book "a man in a womans world" , the author was on the board of a rape crisis center ( in waterford I think) - he praises the work that they did but he got so sick of the constant men bashing he left.

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    Government money? Where do I sign up , ye patriarchal , brainwashed , male scum! ?

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    Politics.ie Member Tiernanator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thac0man View Post
    I seem to remember a simluar response form the Rape Crises Centre regarding their ignoring of the problem of male/male rape. There is perhaps a case to made that such institutions, recieveing state funding, should be run by professionals, not activitists with a single gender agenda.

    I agree and for everyone's information there is an excellent UK based organisation called SurvivorsUK for male victims of rape and sexual abuse. Ireland needs it's own Survivors organisation.

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    Some of their campaign posters feature male victims. I've seen them at bus stops.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Factorem View Post
    It's the remnants of the feminist era.

    Basically, it's social engineering masquerading as "womens' welfare".
    yup.

    ironcially its left most of these people some of the most sexist biggoted individuals in the country.

    case in point the ex party barring order. when it was shot down by the supreme court for being unconstitutiona, generally meaning for over a decade men had their rights violated on a daily basis, joan burtons first line of comment was along the lines of "this is terrible, how can we get this back to protect poor women !"

    completly missing the shagging point.

    there are people in this country that think men DONT get raped, never mind account for over 40% (and THATS the official figures, how many men in reality would actually report this?) and TBH half the feckers in charge seem to have some kind of guilt complex going on and thats how we end up in a country when a woman is actually DONE for raping her son she gets less time than a drink driver would

    in regards to the OP its complete bollocks to say women are more in danger than men as studies have show BOTH sides being more exposed to it depending on the criteria. i vividly remember one showing men were more likely to be the victims of women and their propensity to use weaponry during the assault that was met with stark disbelief by the powers that be.

    put simply its just more of the PC , dont bother your arse checking the facts, sterotyping that ive come to expect from our leaders from the "women are saints, men are bastards - dont you know that?" school of thought.

    DONT expect it to change anytime soon.

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    Politics.ie Member Andrew49's Avatar
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    Default Fighting the Myths

    From AMEN: AMEN

    AMEN is a voluntary group, founded by Mary Cleary in December 1997, which provides a confidential helpline, a support service and information for male victims of domestic abuse. Thousands of men and supportive members of their families have contacted the helpline since it was set up.

    Callers to AMEN come from all walks of life.

    AMEN has encountered denial of the existence and the experiences of male victims.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    The vast majority of recorded incidents of domestic violence are of men on women. Society, although aware of the male victim, treats him as a joke. In reality he is a man in fear, a man in isolation, a man stigmatised as weak. Why? Because he does not conform to the stereotypical male image.

    In law, a male victim faces two obstacles; firstly to prove he is a victim, and secondly, to ensure that his children are protected and do not become the new victims. Men very often remain in an abusive relationship for the sake and protection of their children. Most men react by staying silent. Often this silence is encouraged by factors such as fear of ridicule and, the realisation that it is unlikely his partner will be evicted. Even when a man has proved he is the victim it seems his only course of action is to leave the home. He is then separated from his children and often experiences difficulty in obtaining realistic and regular contact with them. He is in fact treated as the perpetrator rather than the victim.

    Modern medicine is aware of certain conditions which may cause people to be violent but we expect such sufferers to seek help or medical treatment. Men are expected to take responsibility for violence and abuse but no excuses are accepted. Yet when a female is violent society provides a list of excuses: Post-natal depression, stress, PMT, eating disorders, personality disorders, menopause, addictions, childhood traumas, provocation, self-defence etc. Although most men will be sensitive to these problems, they should not have to suffer violence as a consequence. When a woman is violent and abusive in a relationship, it is not necessarily assumed that she is a bad mother. If a man is violent towards his partner, it is automatically assumed that he is an unfit parent.

    The law presumes that the children are almost always better off with their mother. Consequently the only options for men seem to be to put up with the abuse or to leave the home, since under the law there is no real protection for them. If a male victim seeks help, society should offer the same protection and help to him and his children as is given to female victims. Women should be judged by the same standards as men, and women who are violent should be held legally responsible for their actions.

    - - - - - - - -

    I think social justice demands equal treatment but it's a fact that women have been under the male cosh for millennium.
    I watched with glee, while your kings and queens, fought for ten decades for the gods they made.

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