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Thread: Sutherland "State must revise fiscal strategy immediately to avert disaster"

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    Default Sutherland "State must revise fiscal strategy immediately to avert disaster"

    now, I am sure the usual crowd will come out saying "sure suds is a blueshirt/banker/oilman/pro-lisbon etc etc".
    however, can I ask that before they unload their bile, they read the below (taken from State must revise fiscal strategy immediately to avert disaster - The Irish Times - Tue, Feb 24, 2009) and tell us what in his analysis or prescription is actually wrong in fact as opposed to opinion. A few FF'ers slouching towards the arentwegreat-fest in CityWest, or a few Greens hanging in grimly till they get a carbon tax would be useful commentators
    IRELAND FACES three intertwined crises. First, the economic crisis is severe, with falling output and sharply increasing level of unemployment a source of misery for many workers and their families.
    Second, the banking crisis sees the Irish banking system facing large projected losses on ill-advised domestic property loans, with the capital squeeze contributing to a credit crunch.
    Third, the projected Government deficits for 2009-2010 are well above 10 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP), raising questions about the sustainability of public finances. I could add a fourth, and not unrelated topic, the ratification of the Lisbon Treaty, but I leave comment on that for another occasion.
    While the economic and banking crises are very troubling, these problems are shared to varying degrees by many countries across Europe and around the world. In addition, the scope of the banking crisis is by now well understood, with an emerging consensus on the scale of potential losses. And the Government’s strategy for handling the banking crisis is well-advanced, even if it is still to evolve in the coming months.
    Rather, the key differentiating factor that has put the international spotlight on Ireland is the sustainability of the public finances. Although the European Commission has launched excessive deficit procedures against six member countries, Ireland’s projected 2009 deficit of 11 per cent of GDP far exceeds the next highest in this group (Spain at 6.2 per cent of GDP). Its projected 2010 deficit of 13 per cent of GDP is more than twice the next highest (Spain at 5.7 per cent of GDP). This has created a terrible crisis for Ireland.
    Concerns about the fiscal situation are reinforced by the patterns in public spending and taxation since the crisis began. While much attention has focused on the decline in tax revenues, this is comparatively minor relative to the sharp growth in the ratio of public spending to GDP.
    Again the comparison with Spain is most telling. Tax revenues actually fell more sharply in Spain than in Ireland between 2007 and 2009: from 41 per cent of GDP to 36.4 per cent of GDP in the Spanish case, versus a decline from 35.7 per cent of GDP to 33.7 percent of GDP in the Irish case. In contrast, government spending has increased from 35.7 per cent of GDP to 44.7 per cent of GDP in Ireland, but only from 38.8 per cent of GDP to 42.6 per cent of GDP in Spain. While the difference can, in part, be attributed to the sharper output contraction in Ireland, it has raised concerns about the scale of the fiscal problem.
    The Government has made some progress in responding to the fiscal crisis, including the measures taken in the October 2008 budget, the attainment of agreement with the social partners as to the broad mix of policies required and the implementation of the public sector pension levy. However, the deterioration in the international financial environment in recent weeks means the gradual adjustment process it set out in the five-year fiscal strategy published in the middle of January is no longer appropriate.
    In particular, there is increasing concern that the withdrawal of capital from central and eastern Europe could trigger major crises in the new member states of the European Union, which in turn could be quickly transmitted to other European economies. Among the western European economies, those that are most vulnerable include Ireland, Greece, Austria, Portugal and Spain.
    Such concerns are placing upward pressure on the spreads these governments must pay to issue bonds, and increase the risk of a funding crisis, by which investors refuse to rollover maturing debt. In turn, the high spread on Irish sovereign debt raises funding costs for the banking system and for corporations, contributing to the economic slowdown and the problems in the banking sector.
    At one level, it might seem far-fetched to believe Ireland may face a funding crisis. After all, Ireland entered this crisis with a low level of public debt, plus sizeable sovereign wealth in the form of the National Pension Reserve Fund. However, the very large Government deficits mean the ratio of debt to GDP is set to grow quickly: from 24.8 per cent of GDP at the end of 2007 to 68.2 per cent by the end of 2010.
    More importantly, the high level of risk aversion in the international markets means many investors are unwilling to give debtors the benefit of the doubt and promises of future fiscal corrections are being heavily discounted. Moreover, the funding risk for the Irish Government is amplified by its guarantee of the liabilities of the covered banks. While even the higher end of the projected scale of losses for the banking system does not pose a threat to the solvency of the Irish Government, a substantial decline in deposits in the banking system would increase funding pressures on it.
    In this fragile environment, it is imperative the Government revises its fiscal strategy within a very short time horizon. In particular, it needs to front-load the correction in the public finances, with more action taken to reduce the 2009 and 2010 budget deficits.
    In line with the broad consensus across the social partners, this must include a significant increase in the tax burden. This cannot wait until the 2010 budget, as is the current wish of the Government. While the Commission on Taxation may well have good ideas for expanding the tax base, much of the adjustment involves the existing set of tax instruments, and the process of reducing tax bands and increasing tax rates can begin immediately.
    The fiscal adjustment also requires that the Government move more aggressively to curb public spending. While the focus has been on current spending (and there is much to be done across the many different lines within that category), it is also time to suspend many of the larger-ticket items in the public capital programme. The priority must be to improve the financial position of the State – those public capital projects that promise high benefit/cost ratios can be restarted once fiscal stability has been restored, while a suspension also allows less worthy projects to be weeded out.
    Since the upward pressure on interest rates means that the currently loose fiscal policy is not helping the recovery in the economy or in the banking sector, a fiscal retrenchment now in fact is the best move open to the Government in restoring health to the economy and banking sector. A decline in spreads will improve asset values and enable the banks to increase the provision of credit. Such factors dominate any loss in domestic demand that would be induced by a mix of higher taxes and lower spending. Moreover, domestic consumption is more likely to be boosted by increased confidence in fiscal stability than by the current situation, whereby any putative benefits from delayed fiscal adjustment are being swept away by the cloud of uncertainty dominating the economy.
    If the Government responds in an agile and confident manner to the current crisis, the medium-term future for the Irish economy remains bright. However, an important characteristic of successful government is knowing when to act quickly in defence of its fiscal reputation. Now is such a time.
    We must have an urgent response to the crisis notwithstanding the difficult background of likely public disquiet about any measures proposed. The alternatives are not pleasant to contemplate.
    Pretty dismal stuff but nothing that the informed commentator class havent been saying for weeks and months. Meanwhile, this seems to sum up the government

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    Inother words balance the books and forget everything else. Let unemployment go through the roof,our health system collapse, our infrastructure decay,our children to be educated poorly. A lot of banal generalities but no specifics. This from a man that sat at the cabinet table as the economy tanked in the 1980s and was chairman of ........oh yeah AN INVESTMENT BANK. I would prefer to take sailing lesson from Capt Ed Smith.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldira1 View Post
    Inother words balance the books and forget everything else. Let unemployment go through the roof,our health system collapse, our infrastructure decay,our children to be educated poorly. A lot of banal generalities but no specifics. This from a man that sat at the cabinet table as the economy tanked in the 1980s and was chairman of ........oh yeah AN INVESTMENT BANK. I would prefer to take sailing lesson from Capt Ed Smith.
    So your suggestion then is? What?

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    Politics.ie Member Sensible Head's Avatar
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    One post and one reply and we have this in a nutshell. Pretty good going for a Forum.

    Yep original post was full of the cold hard facts of life. But no, ill be buggered bandy if i'll take advice from the clowns who pushed us over the edge.

    Yep thinks thats it.


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    Politics.ie Member HarshBuzz's Avatar
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    Sutherland would make a damn good Minister for Finance

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    I'll admit that the source doesn't fell me with glee, but in a way that just makes the analysis more depressing. As an expression of fundamentals, it just seems like realism - in terms of analysing the specific problems and their likely development, the man is simply calling a spade a spade.

    He is in a way just saying 'We're ****ed', but he's saying it in a sophisticated way - i.e. 'We're ****ed in this particular fashion for these particular reasons, and unless we do x, y & z we risk being even more ****ed'.

    While I doubt enormously that I'd agree with any list of measures that Sutherland might produce (I sometimes suspect he'd find targetted starvation of non-productive members of society to be an unfortunate necessity in some cases), this is still a more (potentially) useful way of framing the sentiment, but it still leaves what I think is the elephant in our parlour. When it comes to taking just about any steps in this crisis then it seems increasingly to me that we have one enormous problem that the government is simply refusing to acknowledge in any meaningful way. This is the sheer lack of trust that a large (and it seems growing) number of people have in the government, and specifically in the Fianna Fáil party. This makes it very difficult (I'd have said impossible) for them to exercise any sound authority that will be generally accepted.

    There is a broad conscensus among an awful lot of people - both informed and uninformed - that the govt. was - at the very, very best - culpably stupid in allowing things to reach the point they did in the banks.

    That things did reach this pass seems - from what we currently know - to have ultimately been due to longterm failures in regulation (all the bankers'/developers' fancy footwork and clever-clever paper plans would have been for naught if the regulators had acted on information which, it seems clear, was available to them at least in outline for a long time).

    That these regulatory failures happened through government foolishness is, unfortunately, the best case scenario. The worst case scenario is that the government was up to its oxters in the financial "misbehaviour", and that the laxness of regulation was deliberately engineered so as to facilitate it.

    I'm not championing either interpretation here, simply noting that these perceptions exist.

    The government, on the other hand, continues to studiously ignore this entire idea (whether from embarrassment, fear of losing its dignity, guilt, pride or whatever) except for the occasional surly and dismissive bark. But this behaviour, If anything, serves only to strengthen and darken peoples' suspicions.

    This disbelieving view of the government is, it seems to me, one of the most important causes of the public's largely negative reaction to proposed government measures, and will only get worse so long as the various questions remain unaddressed. I don't think it's exaggerating at all to say it may ultimately confound the government's entire plan - presuming (as it is increasingly difficult to do) that they actually have anything that might (except in charity) be called a "plan".

    Sutherland's analysis tells us yet again what the circumstances make inevitable - that we're all going to have to take a big, big slap if things are not to go down the drain entirely. But even should the government by some utter miracle come out in the morning with a survival plan which is credible, coherent and equitable, it may well be that nobody will trust them enough to accept it.

    If that were the case, I'm the very first to admit that Fianna Fáil would have been hoist with their own petard; the problem is that we'd be hoisted up right alongside them.
    Last edited by Mitsui; 24th February 2009 at 12:05 PM. Reason: clarification

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    Looking at my post above in cold hard print, it strikes me that I might almost be accused of liking either Peter Sutherland or Fianna Fáil. I feel obliged to note that neither is the case. I was just trying to sound fairer than I usually feel.
    Last edited by Mitsui; 24th February 2009 at 12:08 PM. Reason: typo

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    Politics.ie Member HarshBuzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitsui View Post
    Looking at my post above in cold hard print, it strikes me that I might almost be accused of likeing either Peter Sutherland or Fianna Fáil. I feel obliged to note that neither is the case. I was just trying to sound fairer than I usually feel.
    it was an excellent post I thought

    look at it this way: FF are heading for extinction at the next poll, whenever that may be. What are the chances of them accepting this fate (deserved and all as it is) and deciding to put the interests of the nation ahead of themselves for once by implementing the tough policies required?

    I'm not optimistic but it does strike me as an opportunity of sorts

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldira1 View Post
    Inother words balance the books and forget everything else. Let unemployment go through the roof,our health system collapse, our infrastructure decay,our children to be educated poorly.
    Not balancing the books will result in umemployment, not the other way around. And to be honest, letting the Health Service collapse, in order that it can be rebuilt, wouldn't be a bad thing.

    I find all of this tiresome at this stage. I don't anticipate that that we will be governing ourselves by this time next year. We're basically just too thick and self-obsessed to realise that the ground is crumbling away beneath our feet.

    All anyone can do now is prepare themselves and their families for the worst.
    A demagogue is someone who will preach doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots.

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    Oldira1 has it summarised well. "Balancing the books" is an overly simplistic idea that Maynard Keynes rubbished in the early half of the previous century and that's all this article is about.

    In any case, to carry out such changes would require a far more joined-up thinking in government than they are capable of (e.g. One day: "HSE €1.1bn overspend", next day: "Consultant's increases approved").

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