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Thread: Problems of success for Labour

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    Politics.ie Member
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    They need to really get active on the ground in some rural constituencies.

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    they need to consolidate that support first - the polls are in a state of flux now and, in the next poll, FG or even SF could be the recipient of the very large floating votes that are out there at the moment.

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    Politics.ie Member ManOfReason's Avatar
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    Candidates under the age of 50 would be a good start. They seem to be by far the oldest looking party of the lot and did poorly in the youth demographic compared to FG.
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    Politics.ie Member setanta's Avatar
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    AggSec, a quick review of the internal on-line forum for the Labour Party demonstrates that the party's activists are very aware of this problem. There is quite a lively discussion going on for example on Gannon's suggested defection to Labour in Galway East.

    However, I would caution aginst the "received wisdom" that Labour lacks a constituency infrastructure. This is not much more than teh produce of lazy journalism.

    I've written on other threads that Labour's on-the-ground organisation in Dublin, in particular, is easilly the measure of both ZANU FF and Fine Vague. Similarly, the party's operations in other urban centres and travel-to-work areas has benefitted significantly from the attenton paid to it since the 2004 election.

    The one area where Labour is weak is in those areas without a record of returning Labour public represenatives, principally in rural Ireland. Our focus cannot be the entire country when it comes to our own organisation. We have to deploy our resources where they will deliver the best electoral reurn and I'm afraid that means urban and commuter Ireland. If, and it's a big "if", we retain 20+% electoral support by the time of the next election we will use that to grow the party's TD's in those areas which promise the greatest returns. One difficult step at a time, as they say.

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    Politics.ie Member setanta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by factual View Post
    They need to really get active on the ground in some rural constituencies.
    Not really. Rural Ireland is well outside of Labour's base as things stand, especially during a time of extraordinary flux.

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    Politics.ie Member setanta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManOfReason View Post
    Candidates under the age of 50 would be a good start. They seem to be by far the oldest looking party of the lot and did poorly in the youth demographic compared to FG.
    More lazy journalism. I would recommend a trip to The Labour Party » » Home Page and your taking a gander at our local election candidates/councillors to see the range of people who comprise the upcoming cohort of Labour public representatives.

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    Politics.ie Member wombat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by setanta View Post
    More lazy journalism. I would recommend a trip to The Labour Party Home Page and your taking a gander at our local election candidates/councillors to see the range of people who comprise the upcoming cohort of Labour public representatives.
    That is the danger if a GE comes before the Locals, candidates need to run in the smaller wards so that parties can get an idea of how they will fare with the people across a constituency. One of the mistakes Labour made in 1969 was displacing local candidates with personalities, it took them years to recover once the personalities were defeated in 1977.
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    Politics.ie Member ManOfReason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by setanta View Post
    More lazy journalism. I would recommend a trip to The Labour Party Home Page and your taking a gander at our local election candidates/councillors to see the range of people who comprise the upcoming cohort of Labour public representatives.
    That is why I said seem to be. Whatever bunch of energetic go getters they believe they have in position to take seats, the national representatives of the party are almost all old. One of the reasons for this I believe is that elected Labour TDs are allowed protect 'their' seats by not allowing any up and coming talent run as a number two on the ticket. A good example would be the Wexford constitutiency when Breand Howlin's seat will probably be lost to the Labour Party when he retires.
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    Is Cork SW an example of the Rural constituencies you mention Setanta that Labour shouldn't focus on?

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    Quote Originally Posted by aggressivesecularist View Post
    To turn the latest poll results into seats there'll be a lot to do. Amongst them is the need to build a constituency infrastructure very quickly.

    As with all fast-growing parties, they'll inevitably have to deal with a whole load of carpet-baggers.

    Felipe Gonzalez's PSOE suffered very badly from this between the start of democratisation and their election victory in 1982.

    If I were a Labour member, this would be a worry.

    Anyone else got advice for Labour on how to turn the poll results into permanent seats.
    Firstly stop being timid ,stand plenty of candidates in the locals ,also contest Ireland West in The Euros. At the GE contest every constituancy ,where there is hope of two seats stand enough candidates ,i believe GE may well occur before the Locals and Euros by the way.

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