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Thread: Internet Censorship: Government Controlled Web

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    Default Internet Censorship: Government Controlled Web

    I believe it's only a matter of time before we get Chinese-style firewalls in the EU and the USA.

    All websites will eventually be forced into registering with an "authority" and if they operate "illegally", they'll be shut down/blocked.

    I'm sure the established media would love this (as would the politicians) and they can go back to deceiving the public en-masse as they have always done.

    The EU are already preparing laws and infrastructure to enable this. Yet another reason to vote 'No' to Lisbon.

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    It all depends on the level of censorship that is applied. If it makes the internet a safer place then it's a good thing. If it helps to stop phishing attacks, spammers, fraudsters, etc then I'm all for it.... as I'm sure whoever runs this forum would be.
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    Politics.ie Newbie Electro's Avatar
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    For personal computers, you just need the right firewall software and be careful about what you download.

    For Internet sites, you need good security arrangements. In any event there's no real way of blocking a determined hacker/DoSer.

    So in both cases security is not a valid reason for Governments censoring political speech.

    Not that it won't be touted as a reason for Australian-style Western Internet censorship.
    Marxists, Feminists and Leftists operate on the basis of "liberating tolerance" - i.e. their ideas should be tolerated, and any opposition should be suppressed.

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    Politics.ie Member ArtyQueing's Avatar
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    The announcement that the British want every sms, email, website visited, called, texted recorded is very worrying.

    They presume everyone is guilty abd so everyone has to be tracked, this must not happen in Ireland as it is a threat to our personal liberty, never trust any government, they have a power which can be abused.

    If you are saying that we should be able to control what our children have access to then I approve, beyond that is dangerous territory indeed.
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    How do we let a few people to control our lives?
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    Politics.ie Member 20000miles's Avatar
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    Heres a link to the story:

    BBC NEWS | UK | UK e-mail law 'attack on rights'

    Rules forcing internet companies to keep details of every e-mail sent in the UK are a waste of money and an attack on civil liberties, say critics.
    From March all internet service providers (ISPs) will by law have to keep information about every e-mail sent or received in the UK for a year.
    Human rights group Liberty says it is worried what will happen next.
    The Home Office insists the data, which does not include e-mails' content, is vital for crime and terror inquiries.
    Some three billion e-mails are thought to be sent each day in the UK. ...
    Worrying indeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Factorem View Post
    I believe it's only a matter of time before we get Chinese-style firewalls in the EU and the USA.

    All websites will eventually be forced into registering with an "authority" and if they operate "illegally", they'll be shut down/blocked.

    I'm sure the established media would love this (as would the politicians) and they can go back to deceiving the public en-masse as they have always done.

    The EU are already preparing laws and infrastructure to enable this. Yet another reason to vote 'No' to Lisbon.
    Well I don't wish to believe that it will happen, that said we need not worry. Given the EU's last misadventure into the internet didn't really work out too well I think we'll be fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20000miles View Post
    Heres a link to the story:

    BBC NEWS | UK | UK e-mail law 'attack on rights'



    Worrying indeed.
    Indeed.

    The following was posted by Barry in the Civil Liberties social group.

    British Police set to step up hacking of home PCs
    David Leppard | January 05, 2009

    THE Home Office has quietly adopted a new plan to allow police across Britain routinely to hack into people's personal computers without a warrant.
    The move, which follows a decision by the European Union’s council of ministers in Brussels, has angered civil liberties groups and opposition MPs. They described it as a sinister extension of the surveillance state which drives “a coach and horses” through privacy laws.

    The hacking is known as “remote searching”. It allows police or MI5 officers who may be hundreds of miles away to examine covertly the hard drive of someone’s PC at his home, office or hotel room.

    Material gathered in this way includes the content of all e-mails, web-browsing habits and instant messaging.

    Under the Brussels edict, police across the EU have been given the green light to expand the implementation of a rarely used power involving warrantless intrusive surveillance of private property. The strategy will allow French, German and other EU forces to ask British officers to hack into someone’s UK computer and pass over any material gleaned.

    A remote search can be granted if a senior officer says he “believes” that it is “proportionate” and necessary to prevent or detect serious crime - defined as any offence attracting a jail sentence of more than three years.

    However, opposition MPs and civil liberties groups say that the broadening of such intrusive surveillance powers should be regulated by a new act of parliament and court warrants.

    They point out that in contrast to the legal safeguards for searching a suspect’s home, police undertaking a remote search do not need to apply to a magistrates’ court for a warrant.

    Shami Chakrabarti, director of Liberty, the human rights group, said she would challenge the legal basis of the move. “These are very intrusive powers – as intrusive as someone busting down your door and coming into your home,” she said.

    “The public will want this to be controlled by new legislation and judicial authorisation. Without those safeguards it’s a devastating blow to any notion of personal privacy.”

    She said the move had parallels with the warrantless police search of the House of Commons office of Damian Green, the Tory MP: “It’s like giving police the power to do a Damian Green every day but to do it without anyone even knowing you were doing it.”

    Richard Clayton, a researcher at Cambridge University’s computer laboratory, said that remote searches had been possible since 1994, although they were very rare. An amendment to the Computer Misuse Act 1990 made hacking legal if it was authorised and carried out by the state.

    He said the authorities could break into a suspect’s home or office and insert a “key-logging” device into an individual’s computer. This would collect and, if necessary, transmit details of all the suspect’s keystrokes. “It’s just like putting a secret camera in someone’s living room,” he said.

    Police might also send an e-mail to a suspect’s computer. The message would include an attachment that contained a virus or “malware”. If the attachment was opened, the remote search facility would be covertly activated. Alternatively, police could park outside a suspect’s home and hack into his or her hard drive using the wireless network.

    Police say that such methods are necessary to investigate suspects who use cyberspace to carry out crimes. These include paedophiles, internet fraudsters, identity thieves and terrorists.

    The Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo) said such intrusive surveillance was closely regulated under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. A spokesman said police were already carrying out a small number of these operations which were among 194 clandestine searches last year of people’s homes, offices and hotel bedrooms.

    “To be a valid authorisation, the officer giving it must believe that when it is given it is necessary to prevent or detect serious crime and (the) action is proportionate to what it seeks to achieve,” Acpo said.

    Dominic Grieve, the shadow home secretary, agreed that the development may benefit law enforcement. But he added: “The exercise of such intrusive powers raises serious privacy issues. The government must explain how they would work in practice and what safeguards will be in place to prevent abuse.”

    The Home Office said it was working with other EU states to develop details of the proposals.

    The Times

    (He didn't give a URL for the story, hence me posting the full text, if anybody can provide it I will edit)
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    Digital Rights Ireland

    Digital Rights Ireland has a good archive on the issues, which takes in the TDR
    legislations. Also many of the Irish issues which are not widely known were
    covered by Karen Lillington in the I.T Backpages and can also be found in the archives..

    I do not have a cache link handy.

    http://www.digitalrights.ie/ = DRI
    Last edited by Christine Murray; 11th January 2009 at 01:47 PM.

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    The Australians I remember hearing a while back tried to but up a firewall and invested many millions in the system. Once it went live it managed to protect the Australian people from inappropriate material without being hacked or brought down...

    ....for a grand total of 27 minutes.

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