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Thread: Dublin Protestants

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    Default Dublin Protestants

    I was reading about the song "Come out you Black and Tans" and it mentioned that the song makes reference to a Dublin protestant working class who had been Black and Tans. It made it sound like they faded away or something over time. Did they intermarry or move out? What happened to them are they still there?

    Lb

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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    Some moved away, some intermarried, some died out, some became atheists. Those that were left tended to keep their heads down.
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    Politics.ie Member Fir Bolg's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    It doesn't refer to Dublin protestants at all. The only protestant the song refers to is Parnell.

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    Politics.ie Member fool's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    There are still a fair few Dublin based working class prods.
    It's highly unlikely that any of them would have been in the Black and Tans, as the tans were recruited in Britain, rather than in Dublin, where people who live in Dublin live.

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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    Quote Originally Posted by fool
    There are still a fair few Dublin based working class prods.
    It's highly unlikely that any of them would have been in the Black and Tans, as the tans were recruited in Britain, rather than in Dublin, where people who live in Dublin live.
    The only thing they may have been is RIC members. Definitely not Black & Tans as already stated.

    There are loads of prods in Dublin now.
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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    The Protestant community declined for a number of reasons.

    The British Armed Forces left. A lot of the apparently sharp decline in the 1920s is because of that.

    The First World War disproportionately affected the Protestant community. A lot were killed and a lot of the women of the era "married out" or stayed single because of the gender imbalance in young Protestant numbers during the 1920s. Combine this with Ne Temere and it has a significant impact on future generations.

    Some felt uncomfortable in the new state and moved north of the border or to Britain. A programme which allowed Irish civil servants to move to the British civil service would have been a factor there as well.

    There were unfortunately a small number of attacks on Protestants around the time of independence, which also encouraged some to leave. However, given the small scale and the fact it was confined to a few very specific localities, I think this tends to get overstated by some for political reasons now.

    Historically, the Protestant birth rate was lower and when the Irish population was stagnant due to emigration, the fact the Protestants proportions were lowering produced a smaller community.

    Ne temere meant that the children of mixed marriages were likely to be brought up catholic.

    But as said above, the Protestant community is still there and numbers seem to have stabilised among the native Protestant population, while being swelled by immigration, so the future isn't as grim as it had once appeared.
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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    Quote Originally Posted by Liverpoolblue
    I was reading about the song "Come out you Black and Tans" and it mentioned that the song makes reference to a Dublin protestant working class who had been Black and Tans. It made it sound like they faded away or something over time. Did they intermarry or move out? What happened to them are they still there?

    Lb
    After independence most Protestants in the south were made to feel more then unwelcome, some were driven out, most moved north or to the mainland.

    As dev said, it was a Catholic country for a Catholic people.

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    Politics.ie Member Tiernanator's Avatar
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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    Quote Originally Posted by Kalif
    Quote Originally Posted by Liverpoolblue
    I was reading about the song "Come out you Black and Tans" and it mentioned that the song makes reference to a Dublin protestant working class who had been Black and Tans. It made it sound like they faded away or something over time. Did they intermarry or move out? What happened to them are they still there?

    Lb
    After independence most Protestants in the south were made to feel more then unwelcome, some were driven out, most moved north or to the mainland.

    As dev said, it was a Catholic country for a Catholic people.
    Kalif they were on the mainland already. Ireland is the mainland you illiterate fool and for your information I am delighted that the protestant community is thriving. Long may it continue.

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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    I wouldn't take that song too literally! It was written by Brendan Behan's less talented brother Dominic. Tans and Brits were under daily attack with several hundred of them killed in Dublin between 1920 and 22 and were all living in barracks and certainly not in digs!

    Song also refers to the IRA chasing them down the "green and lovely lanes of Killeshandra" in Cavan. Which is a bit of a local joke as the IRA did almost nothing in Cavan.

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    Default Re: Dublin Protestants

    There was a steady stream of English immigrants into Dublin in the latter part of the 19th century - craftsmen, small traders and so on. And British soldiers sometimes brought their families over for long spells. When independence came in the 1920s their offspring still had family ties with the old country. So it was hardly surprising that many of them would drift back. It was not unlike the migrations to and from British colonies in more distant parts of the world.

    Other working class protestants came from families that had lived in the city for generations and would not have been subject to the same pull.

    Don't go looking for simple explanations of the demographic trends after independence. Dublin is, and always has been, a mongrel city. And every family history is different.

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