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Thread: "Grievance Studies"; your grief, our money

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    Politics.ie Member McTell's Avatar
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    Lightbulb "Grievance Studies"; your grief, our money

    Hoax papers: The shoddy, absurd and unethical side of academia



    I saw something like this in the sundays, and the IT have joined in the debate. To my surprise! We love a grievance here, and nursing one quietly for decades or even centuries. We are supposed to value forgiveness, but where's the fun in that? Grievance is free, but then you realise it changes you into another person, and the real cost is high.

    Studying grievances such as slavery-by-europeans or skin-colour-discrimination, or our penal laws and famines achieves nothing if it is not comparative. The unis / third level sector costs the state €2.2 billion a year, with about 200,000 enrolled.

    Academia's value system is based on "tenure", a medieval concept where a prof is now being paid for life and not on a shorter-term contract. Above that, publishing papers that are "peer reviewed" by their mates and quoted in turn, raises your status. Very often a paper is 95% a rehash of other papers, with 5% saying something new.

    Even then, the public who are paying the 2 billion pa can't often read the papers / research because they are behind a paywall at Jstor and the like. We pay, the profs get the credit, someone else gets the money. This seems wrong.

    The students, whose parents/state are subbing the €2,000,000,000 pa, are not even on the ladder and will be rewarded with a coloured piece of parchment after 3-4 years, that could perhaps be finished in 1-2 years.


    Sooo, 3 brave academics, Pluckrose, Lindsay and Boghossian, submitted 20 cráp papers that were all "outlandish or intentionally broken.." with "some little bit of lunacy or depravity"... 7 papers were accepted for publication and 4 were published "before the hoaxers were rumbled".

    The process of saying the right thing to the machinery of thousands of "journals" could lead to a career because, hey, if they're so lax at the gate then clearly the system can be gamed.


    Academic Grievance Studies and the Corruption of Scholarship - Areo


    Feminist glaciology? Okay, we’ll copy it and write a feminist astronomy paper that argues feminist and queer astrology should be considered part of the science of astronomy, which we’ll brand as intrinsically sexist. Reviewers were very enthusiastic about that idea.
    McTell tCurrently, I am missing certain information. That has been requested and will be added as soon as it is available available availableavailable

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    Quote Originally Posted by McTell View Post
    Feminist glaciology? Okay, we’ll copy it and write a feminist astronomy paper that argues feminist and queer astrology should be considered part of the science of astronomy, which we’ll brand as intrinsically sexist. Reviewers were very enthusiastic about that idea.
    Sounds fascinating
    Abstract

    Glaciers are key icons of climate change and global environmental change. However, the relationships among gender, science, and glaciers – particularly related to epistemological questions about the production of glaciological knowledge – remain understudied. This paper thus proposes a feminist glaciology framework with four key components: 1) knowledge producers; (2) gendered science and knowledge; (3) systems of scientific domination; and (4) alternative representations of glaciers. Merging feminist postcolonial science studies and feminist political ecology, the feminist glaciology framework generates robust analysis of gender, power, and epistemologies in dynamic social-ecological systems, thereby leading to more just and equitable science and human-ice interactions.
    As they say "gravity is only a theory"

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    When everyone has a degree but no one has an education any sort of nonsense is possible.

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    Politics.ie Member Socratus O' Pericles's Avatar
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    This kind of thing always went on yet here we are.
    The truth of an idea is not a stagnant property inherent in it. Truth happens to an idea. It becomes true, is made true by events.

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    Politics.ie Member Clanrickard's Avatar
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    High time the government cut funding to any third level institution that has this crapola on its course list.

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    Politics.ie Member McTell's Avatar
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    Anyone know the irish for womxn? Can we say Mnx, or is that too much like Minx?


    Should women be spelt womxn? - BBC News


    Like women, womxn refers to females, but it is an attempt to get away from patriarchal language.
    Dr Clara Bradbury-Rance, fellow at King's College London, said the spelling "stems from a longstanding objection to the word woman as it comes from man, and the linguistic routes of the word mean that it really does come from the word man".
    The word is also supposed to be inclusive of trans women, and some non-binary people.
    But how is it pronounced? "I've heard womxn pronounced in lots of different ways. I've heard some pronounce it 'wo-minx'," Dr Bradbury-Rance says.

    McTell tCurrently, I am missing certain information. That has been requested and will be added as soon as it is available available availableavailable

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    Don't get the Muslims started on their 'grievances'......

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    Quote Originally Posted by McTell View Post
    Anyone know the irish for womxn? Can we say Mnx, or is that too much like Minx?


    Should women be spelt womxn? - BBC News


    Like women, womxn refers to females, but it is an attempt to get away from patriarchal language.
    Dr Clara Bradbury-Rance, fellow at King's College London, said the spelling "stems from a longstanding objection to the word woman as it comes from man, and the linguistic routes of the word mean that it really does come from the word man".
    The word is also supposed to be inclusive of trans women, and some non-binary people.
    But how is it pronounced? "I've heard womxn pronounced in lots of different ways. I've heard some pronounce it 'wo-minx'," Dr Bradbury-Rance says.

    I think that would be mo ron.

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    Politics.ie Member twokidsmanybruises's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by McTell View Post
    Anyone know the irish for womxn? Can we say Mnx, or is that too much like Minx?


    Should women be spelt womxn? - BBC News



    Like women, womxn refers to females, but it is an attempt to get away from patriarchal language.
    Dr Clara Bradbury-Rance, fellow at King's College London, said the spelling "stems from a longstanding objection to the word woman as it comes from man, and the linguistic routes of the word mean that it really does come from the word man".
    The word is also supposed to be inclusive of trans women, and some non-binary people.
    But how is it pronounced? "I've heard womxn pronounced in lots of different ways. I've heard some pronounce it 'wo-minx'," Dr Bradbury-Rance says.

    This drives me nuts, along with complaints about the word "human". It's based on the misunderstanding of the etymology of the words.

    The basic argument is that "woman" is "wo-man", and in Old English "wif-man", which is true. In these arguments, wif" is usually translated into modern English as "wif" and "man" as "man". So "woman" is a patricarchai word because it is literally, "the wife of the man", like "Mrs", and so the woman is the property of the man.

    The problem is that this isn't really an accurate translation. "wif" did mean "wife" sometimes. But it also acted as a prefix to denote femininity. "Man" wasn't masculine in Old English, it was neutral. "Man" did not necessarily mean "man/a male person", it meant "human" or "person".

    "wif-man" then can translate literally as "female person". Which doesn't necessarily have any derogatory connotations.

    I vaguely remember that from my primary degree, by the way. A long time ago. But it shows that university shouldn't necessarily be written off as useful or that arts/humanities students always blindly buy into academic fads.
    "A little lie goes a long way when you can't say quite for sure what's the truth" - Mark Oliver Everett

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    Politics.ie Member IvoShandor's Avatar
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    Well, this is no surprise. Revelations about shoddy practices in Academia and Academic publishing and about low standards of rigour in the more nebulous areas of scholarly inquiry are coming thick and fast these days. remember Sokal?
    "Know the white, but keep to the role of the black" -Lao Tzu

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