Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 71

Thread: Imaginative maths and science teaching

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    13,693
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Imaginative maths and science teaching

    Iv'e read that science and maths' high dropout rates in secondary schools are caused by unimaginative teaching. Maybe the teachers' themselves lack specialised degrees that arguably may be necessary to teach those subjects. In my schooldays,maths was taught in academic abstractions and I suppose this is still largely the case.

    In one example of imaginative teaching that I heard of,a university professor regularly takes his students to the Casino to apply probability statistics on small bets. Similarly,without leaving the classroom this approach could be applied to televised horse racing and to card games. Of course, this creates a small risk of gambling addiction among students.

    I can't readily think of imaginative ways to teach algebra,except that I assisted my nephew on the basic rules by substituting arithmetic numbers for the mysterious symbols eg 2(4-1) - 6/2 = 3.

    I suppose algebraic equations could be applied on computer simulations to illustrate stress tests for bridges or the height limits of skyscrapers. It would be fun to tweak an equation and then watch a bridge collapse from an earthquake or a too tall skyscraper collapse of its own weight in a computer simulation.

    At primary school level,it would be fun to learn arithmetic from playing Rings or Darts. Years ago, Rings was a popular pub game in which a player tossed a rubber ring onto a board of pegs with numbers.

    Some of the numbers could be negative to teach subtraction. There must be other games that teach multiplication and division. Darts and Rings rules could be adjusted to do that by making some numbers divisors and some multipliers. For example,if a dart hit a double on an odd number 1,3 or 5 etc, the cumulative game score could be multiplied by that double number;and if it hit a treble on an even number the game score could be divided by that number provided the division did not leave a remainder. So if the game score was 700 and the dart hit a treble 20, the game score would drop to 700/20 = 35 but if it hit treble 19 the game score would remain the same since 700/57 = 684 + 16.

    How imaginative is the maths and science teaching in today's classrooms?

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I don't buy it tbh. I've just been through the school system -- where I studied Biology, Physics, and Maths -- and I am now in University, studying Biology. I can say that, in my experience, most people don't like science and maths simply because they don't want to be challenged. It's intellectual laziness. They want the easy ride; art, languages, etc. I had very dedicated teachers who genuinely displayed a passion for science, but it wasn't shared by the vast majority. If people find science boring, I can't really understand why, I think it's fascinating, and I've always loved it.

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member wombat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    31,205
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    When the Grants were introduced first, 4 C's were needed for a grant, maths or Irish counted as 2, to encourage kids to take the higher level papers. Sometime over the years the rules changed so we have kids taking easy subjects to accumulate points. Maths are not easy but their difficulty is exaggerated. Personally, I think the emphasis in secondary schools should be on giving kids a basic knowledge of science rather than chasing current fads. There is no intrinsic value in teaching a kid how to use a computer - even if you teach them to use a spreadsheet, what's the point if they don't understand the basic maths on which it is based.
    Beer is proof that God loves us - Benjamin Franklin

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    3
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I agree with you regarding the points race. It's all about the easiest route to one's third level course. It's not about education anymore. If you see the number of people taking grinds, you soon realise that it's become quite the business as well.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I'm in leaving cert year and I love maths the way it is taught.

    Maths is abstract! We need to be taught it as such, rather than dumb it down.
    Automatic Writing (radical politics/queer stuff/internet noise)
    Sous les paves, la plage.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member wombat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    31,205
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ataxia
    I'm in leaving cert year and I love maths the way it is taught.

    Maths is abstract! We need to be taught it as such, rather than dumb it down.
    You have the right idea, applications can come later but it is essential to get your foundation right.
    Beer is proof that God loves us - Benjamin Franklin

  7. #7

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wombat
    Quote Originally Posted by Ataxia
    I'm in leaving cert year and I love maths the way it is taught.

    Maths is abstract! We need to be taught it as such, rather than dumb it down.
    You have the right idea, applications can come later but it is essential to get your foundation right.
    Applications come from subjects like physics, applied maths, economics (even though it is a psuedoscience) etc.
    Automatic Writing (radical politics/queer stuff/internet noise)
    Sous les paves, la plage.

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12,851
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adamd164
    I don't buy it tbh. I've just been through the school system -- where I studied Biology, Physics, and Maths -- and I am now in University, studying Biology. I can say that, in my experience, most people don't like science and maths simply because they don't want to be challenged. It's intellectual laziness. They want the easy ride; art, languages, etc. I had very dedicated teachers who genuinely displayed a passion for science, but it wasn't shared by the vast majority. If people find science boring, I can't really understand why, I think it's fascinating, and I've always loved it.
    Languages easy?
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    12,851
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ataxia
    I'm in leaving cert year and I love maths the way it is taught.

    Maths is abstract! We need to be taught it as such, rather than dumb it down.
    Not everyone's learning style is suited to abstract teaching though. It may suit you and I for instance, but we are not in the majority. If it is such an abstract subject, then a concerted effort needs to be made to contextualise is, to make it more concrete for individuals with differing learning styles. This is not dumbing it down.
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •