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Thread: New data protection laws bad for the parish pump

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Default New data protection laws bad for the parish pump

    I see that the excellent news that data protection laws are likely to get in the way of parish-pump populism is being reported as bad news for ... emmm ... the parish-pump politicians.

    TDs fear new data protection rules will hamper constituency work -- Irish Times

    Personally, if I were still living in Ireland, I would have less problem with Unilever (for example) having my personal details on file than my local Fianna Fáil Cumann (or any other political party for that matter).

    Excessive access by politicians to the personal data belonging to their constituents is one of the major factors enabling the playacting that passes for political campaigning in Ireland.

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    Politics.ie Member Clanrickard's Avatar
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    Toland it is not parish pump populism....it...*giggle*....is...*giggle*...const ituency work.

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    From the article:

    "There is also concern among some Oireachtas members that the use of the so-called marked register could be restricted when the new laws are in place."

    If that's not good news then I don't know what is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clanrickard View Post
    Toland it is not parish pump populism....it...*giggle*....is...*giggle*...const ituency work.
    But but, he fixed the pothole....
    A few weeks before my grandfather died, he started dipping his feet in a bucket of lard.
    He went downhill very fast after that.

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    Politics.ie Member Half Nelson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    I see that the excellent news that data protection laws are likely to get in the way of parish-pump populism is being reported as bad news for ... emmm ... the parish-pump politicians.

    TDs fear new data protection rules will hamper constituency work -- Irish Times

    Personally, if I were still living in Ireland, I would have less problem with Unilever (for example) having my personal details on file than my local Fianna Fáil Cumann (or any other political party for that matter).

    Excessive access by politicians to the personal data belonging to their constituents is one of the major factors enabling the playacting that passes for political campaigning in Ireland.
    the marked register records the names and address of those who have voted and those who have not.
    Can anybody see a problem with that, esp. in the smaller polling areas?

    It may be possible to know how somebody voted... or didn't vote.

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    Politics.ie Member gerhard dengler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Nelson View Post
    Can anybody see a problem with that, esp. in the smaller polling areas?

    It may be possible to know how somebody voted... or didn't vote.
    Marked register is presumably the list which gets "marked" by the polling officer when you attend the polling station to vote?

    I guess part of the presumption might include - are the "unmarked" names listed on the register accurate? For those "unmarked" entries is the master data accurate? The address will probably be correct, but is the occupant master data correct for every single address?
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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Nelson View Post
    Can anybody see a problem with that, esp. in the smaller polling areas?

    It may be possible to know how somebody voted... or didn't vote.
    It's always possible to know whether someone voted or not, and in many cases one can come to fairly solid conclusions on how they voted, especially when combined with doorstep information carefully collected by canvassers and/or people assigned to giving likely voters lifts to the polling stations.

    And not just in smaller polling areas either. An experienced wielder of their local marked register can usually make an educated guess at the votes of almost everyone on that register.
    Last edited by Toland; 22nd August 2017 at 03:49 PM.

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    Data protection racket.

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    Politics.ie Member Toland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerhard dengler View Post
    Marked register is presumably the list which gets "marked" by the polling officer when you attend the polling station to vote?

    I guess part of the presumption might include - are the "unmarked" names listed on the register accurate? For those "unmarked" entries is the master data accurate? The address will probably be correct, but is the occupant master data correct for every single address?
    If the electoral register is anything like it was when I last looked at it in the 1980s it's hopelessly inaccurate. Students living away from home routinely registered twice, dead people remained on the register, sometimes for decades, parents and children with the same forenames were treated as duplicates or two separate people almost randomly, emigrants who'd been away for years got their parents to ensure that their names remained on the list, etc., etc.

    Becoming Pat O'Connor Pat O'Connor was thus easier than falling off a log. And children were regularly deprived of their franchise accidentally by their parents, and vice versa.

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    Politics.ie Member gerhard dengler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toland View Post
    If the electoral register is anything like it was when I last looked at it in the 1980s it's hopelessly inaccurate. Students living away from home routinely registered twice, dead people stayed on the register sometimes for decades, parents and children with the same forenames were treated as duplicates or two separate people almost randomly, etc. etc.

    Becoming Pat O'Connor Pat O'Connor was easier than falling off a log. And children were regularly deprived of their franchise accidentally by their parents, and vice versa.
    I agree as it happens.

    But let's be clear here. Data Protection is essentially ensuring the custody and protection of data so that it is not used for the any other purpose than the purpose it was intended.

    Put simply an employee gives me their name, address, PPS number and their date of birth.
    I am required to ensure that this information remains confidential, and that I have documented processes and procedure to ensure that the data record concerning that employee remains confidential, and that any communication of this employees information can be legally justified. Therefore under the data protection act, I cannot for example supply this confidential information to a third party such as a marketing company, but I can communicate this confidential information to the (Income) Tax Office.

    So data protection boils down to how sensitive/confidential information is securely retained, and if required, how/why this information is transferred to a third party.

    One essential issue here is that for information to be of benefit, the master data needs to be accurate.

    Like you say the election rolls probably contain a large proportion of information which is not accurate.
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