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Thread: Recordings of native Irish speakers from Louth, Cavan, Tipp

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    Default Recordings of native Irish speakers from Louth, Cavan, Tipp

    Lá Nua provides a link to a very interesting resource which contains recordings of native Irish speakers from Antrim, Clare, Leitrim, Armagh, Cavan, Tyrone, Louth, Roscommon, Tipperary and Sligo. The recordings were made between 1928 and 1931.

    Its very sad to think that these voices represent the end of 25 centuries of unbroken native Irish use in their respective counties. What is worse is that it happened so close to our watch.

    http://www.nuacht.com/colm/recordings.html

    Please post in English

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    The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.

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    Politics.ie Member Darren Mac an Phríora's Avatar
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    Undoubtely there are still native Irish speakers in those counties- people whose first language is Irish. There may only be a handful or a couple of dozen but there still are.

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    Why was the Irish segment of my post deleted?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauriceenjack
    The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
    You know, whenever I look at those TG4 gael-babes (which is often) that's always the image I get. Peasants.

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    Politics.ie Member White Horse's Avatar
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    I had a quick listen to some of the snippets.

    The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

    They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

    Why is this?

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    Politics.ie Member Darren Mac an Phríora's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse
    The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

    They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

    Why is this?
    Irish is a very good language for expressing yourself in. When people are speaking Irish naturally about things they are interested in there is more of a "flow" of expression and that sounds more round phonetically.

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    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse
    I had a quick listen to some of the snippets.

    The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

    They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

    Why is this?
    One has to understand that the Irish spoken in places like Leitrim, Clare, and mid-Connacht, was less isolated, and hence less insular than the Irish spoken in many of the Gaeltachtaí today. People often mistake Cois Fharraige for the standard Connacht dialect, with which it varied considerably. The fact that these places were economically subsistent and independent from surrounding areas is one of the reasons why Irish survived therein, but it also allowed for stronger dialectal dissimilated from the local more standardised varieties, and the dialects therein tended to become rather exclusive, gated and cryptic to all those who did not belong to those areas.

    There are of course Gaeltachtaí alive today, who weren't so gated, indeed, these are the weakest. In areas like Muscraí, An Leitriúch, Túir Mhic Éadaigh, the language is much clearer and easier to understand, and tends not to have such strong dialectal influence.
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

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    [quote=Darren Mac an Phríora]
    Quote Originally Posted by "White Horse":2yn8devg
    The thing that struck me how phoenetically pretty it was. It sounded very natural and sounds were "round", unlike the TG4 gael-babes.

    They seem to spit out the words with exagerrated "t" sounds. A bit like the way Dubs speak English?

    Why is this?
    Irish is a very good language for expressing yourself in. When people are speaking Irish naturally about things they are interested in there is more of a "flow" of expression and that sounds more round phonetically.[/quote:2yn8devg]

    With it's many variations, it's an excellent language to be an individual in. Myles Dillon, while researching Irish on the aran Island, found variences in pronounciation, vocabularly and phrases, not only in different houses, but within different members of the family. Like in German, as can be seen from Cré na Cille, many Irish speakers have their own idiosyncratic phrases which can be used to identify one speaker from another, as was it's function in Máirtín Ó Cadhain's novel. T'anam on diucs, honest engine, abu búna, a ru. mo chúis, etc.
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauriceenjack
    The demise in the language was inevitable as part of leaving the peasant past behind. The Language is gone, get over it and look to the future.
    And the peasant future is alive and well............

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