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Thread: Rumour of closure of St. James's Gate Brewery?

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    Default Rumour of closure of St. James's Gate Brewery?

    I heard this during the two days of eating and drinking that Guinness(Diageo), might be selling the premises at St. James's Gate. Has anyone heard any mention of this, obviously it has always been a possibility, but what would the city be like if the brewery was torn down and some bloody apartments or shopping centre was put in? Is it ever a possibility that the government would purchase the land and preserve it?
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    Yup, I heard that months back. There's a plan to sell James' Gate and move to a greenfield site in North Dublin.. especially if the port heads up to Balbriggan.
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    Diageo some time ago mentioned they were considering several options as part of a business review but didn't say that they were (or were not) considering James Gate's future as part of that review. i think that its rather unlikely that they would shut or move to an alternative location, its heavily marketed as the "home of the black stuff" and is an integral part of the brand, thats not to say it won't happen but i don;t think its likely
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    Politics.ie Member Catalpa's Avatar
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    Its being doing the rounds for a while - if it makes commercial sense then its likely to happen.

    Having your main distribution base stuck in the middle of an ever increasingly clogged city costs money.

    Sentiment will count for nothing here but if it is sold off then perhaps a small presence will be retained on site for forms sake.

    Only thing that might stop it in its tracks is a huge downturn in property values next year.

    In fact given the way sales of Guinness continue to decline its possible the brand will effectively be gone within a generation anyway....

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    I read at the weekend that they were looking at a number of possible sites. Leixlip was mentioned.

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    It's gonna be a battle between sentiment and economics. The site could be worth up to a billion euro, which is a ludicrous amount of money to turn away. There's real potential for a great city quarter to be based around the proposed Heuston DART, Luas and intercity rail hub. It's partly earmarked for development in the Heuston gateway framework plan, but not in it's entirety. We could have high rise, new streets and linkages, great new urban spaces (finally) and a whole district based around pedestrians, cyclists and public transport - the sort of place that would put Docklands in it's rightful place as a shambles and a wasted opportunity.
    We need to radically change every system that has enabled the wholesale destruction of the Irish landscape, rural and urban. There is no time for incremental step by step measures. The systems have failed utterly and the only hope for a real recovery requires the rule book to be torn up completely.

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    Leixlip and offshore are out of the question, because Diageo know that the brand value of Guinness is very closely associated with its Dublin image. They could not sustain the bad publicity of losing that. Nothing to do with sentimentality by the way, other than the customers' sentimentality - for Diageo, it's a straight commercial decision. That said, they could probably sustain a move to another site as long as they could say that it was 'in' Dublin, be it city or county.

    The real issue is how Diageo have destroyed a whole quarter of inner-city Dublin. With 70 per cent or more of their site derelict, they have dragged down the whole south-west party of Dublin city centre by forcing down values and eliminating many possible land uses, and attracting crime and anti-social behaviour. You only have to look at Victoria Quay, the south quay of the Liffey closest to Heuston Station. It is a grim, derelict and dreadful place. Other cities celebrate their riverfronts. On Victoria Quay, any pedestrian is lucky if all they suffer is being gassed with the fumes of the HGVs roaring past.

    Guinness is a massively profitable product. Dublin should not tolerate this multinational destroying a whole quarter of the city.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJG
    The real issue is how Diageo have destroyed a whole quarter of inner-city Dublin. With 70 per cent or more of their site derelict, they have dragged down the whole south-west party of Dublin city centre by forcing down values and eliminating many possible land uses, and attracting crime and anti-social behaviour. You only have to look at Victoria Quay, the south quay of the Liffey closest to Heuston Station. It is a grim, derelict and dreadful place. Other cities celebrate their riverfronts. On Victoria Quay, any pedestrian is lucky if all they suffer is being gassed with the fumes of the HGVs roaring past.

    Guinness is a massively profitable product. Dublin should not tolerate this multinational destroying a whole quarter of the city.
    Yeh. That's a very good point. Problem is that Guinness is seen as a prestige blue chip product for Dublin, and a pretty big reason tourists come here. As such, statements like yours rarely get a chance to be aired. It's similar in a way to the disgraceful treatment of Pearse St by TCD over the decades (now being addressed). Victoria Quay is a dead frontage, killed by Guinness. I couldn't agree more on this issue. Hopefully whatever happens here, and in the Digital HUb sites will help bring some life back to the SW inner city.
    We need to radically change every system that has enabled the wholesale destruction of the Irish landscape, rural and urban. There is no time for incremental step by step measures. The systems have failed utterly and the only hope for a real recovery requires the rule book to be torn up completely.

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    Politics.ie Member mr_anderson's Avatar
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    This was in the press months ago.
    Ive no doubt they will sell up and move outside of the city.
    They will probably keep a token guinness 'musuem' for the visitors, but as to production in the city centre, its time is long gone.

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    The Sunday Tribune had this story during the summer. Seemingly, the possibility of a greenfield site near the relocated port was being considered.

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