Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 48 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 471

Thread: The Irish Holocaust , historys largest cover up?

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Armagh
    Posts
    2,104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default The Irish Holocaust , historys largest cover up?

    The Times editorial of September 30, 1845, warned; "In England the two main meals of a working man's day now consists of potatoes." England's potato-dependence was excessive; reckless.
    Grossly over-populated relative to its food supply, England faced famine unless it could import vast amounts of alternative food.
    But it didn't grab merely Ireland's surplus food; or enough Irish food to save England. It took more; for profit and to exterminate the people of Ireland. Queen Victoria's economist, Nassau Senior, expressed his fear that existing policies "will not kill more than one million Irish in 1848 and that will scarcely be enough to do much good."
    When an eye-witness urged a stop to the genocide-in-progress, Trevelyan replied: "We must not complain of what we really want to obtain.
    " Trevelyan insisted that all reports of starvation were exaggerated, until 1847. He then declared it ended and refused entry to the American food relief ship Sorciére. Thomas Carlyle; influential British essayist, wrote; "Ireland is like a half-starved rat that crosses the path of an elephant. What must the elephant do? Squelch it - by heavens - squelch it." "Total Annihilation;" suggested The Times leader of September 2, 1846; and in 1848 its editorialists crowed
    "A Celt will soon be as rare on the banks of the Shannon as the red man on the banks of Manhattan."
    The immortal Society of Friends, the "Quakers," did all in their power to save lives. But in 1847 they despaired and quit, upon learning that the Crown planned to perpetuate the genocide's pretext; the British claim of "ownership" of Irish land. Quakers refused to facilitate the genocide by pretending (as Concern does re African genocides) it was an act of nature.


    There were many "Voices in the Wilderness" risking all to stop the genocide. For example; Wexford-born Jane Wilde, mother of Oscar and poetess, wrote under the nom de plume "Speranza," in the United Irishman newspaper the following (verses 1 and 6 printed here) during the depths of 1847 re the British genocidists and the innocents they were exterminating

    THE FAMINE YEAR

    Weary men, what reap ye? "Golden corn for the Stranger."
    What sow ye? "Human corpses that await for the Avenger."
    Fainting forms, all hunger-stricken, what see you in the offing?
    "Stately ships to bear our food away amid the stranger's scoffing."
    There's a proud array of soldiers what do they round your door?
    "They guard our masters' granaries from the thin hands of the poor."
    Pale mothers, wherefore weeping? "Would to God that we were dead"
    Our children swoon before us, and we cannot give them bread!"

    "We are wretches, famished, scorned, human tools to build your pride,
    But God will yet take vengeance for the souls for whom Christ died.
    Now is your hour of pleasure, bask ye in the world's caress;
    But our whitening bones against ye will arise as witnesses,
    From the cabins and the ditches, in their charred, uncoffined masses,
    For the Angel of the Trumpet will know them as he passes.
    A ghastly, spectral army before God we'll stand
    And arraign ye as our murderers, O spoilers of our land!"


    Its 2007 and people still believe that potatoes a crop not native to Ireland was the reason so many people died in a rich luscious agricultural and ideal country for crop growth and food.

    Its ridiculous, the world still mocks the irish today for their "spud famine"
    The Irish government shows complete disregard for this event and to let this potato nonsence go on any longer is pissing on the graves of so many who perished.

    Is our national history important, or worth covering up?

    **edit

    Oops forgot to put in a link..

    http://www.irishholocaust.org/tollofholocaust
    Abstinence makes the Church grow fondlers.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member White Horse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Dundalk
    Posts
    7,054
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The Irish Holocaust , historys largest cover up?

    Quote Originally Posted by st333ve
    The Irish government shows complete disregard for this event and to let this potato nonsence go on any longer is pissing on the graves of so many who perished.

    Is our national history important, or worth covering up?
    The Famine merits greater remembrance in Ireland. It was the turning point that showed Irish people that the Union couldn't work for them and self-government was a necessity.

    I would welcome greater awareness of the Famine and would hope that it would not be used as a means by certain individuals to promote their anti-Britishness.

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    12,595
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The Irish Holocaust , historys largest cover up?

    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse
    Quote Originally Posted by st333ve
    The Irish government shows complete disregard for this event and to let this potato nonsence go on any longer is pissing on the graves of so many who perished.

    Is our national history important, or worth covering up?
    The Famine merits greater remembrance in Ireland. It was the turning point that showed Irish people that the Union couldn't work for them and self-government was a necessity.

    I would welcome greater awareness of the Famine and would hope that it would not be used as a means by certain individuals to promote their anti-Britishness.
    It should be used as a vehicle to promote pro-potatoe sentiment.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member Aindriu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Somewhere up in the Wicklow mountains digging an even deeper nuclear shelter
    Posts
    8,689
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Re: The Irish Holocaust , historys largest cover up?

    Quote Originally Posted by White Horse
    Quote Originally Posted by st333ve
    The Irish government shows complete disregard for this event and to let this potato nonsence go on any longer is pissing on the graves of so many who perished.

    Is our national history important, or worth covering up?
    The Famine merits greater remembrance in Ireland. It was the turning point that showed Irish people that the Union couldn't work for them and self-government was a necessity.

    I would welcome greater awareness of the Famine and would hope that it would not be used as a means by certain individuals to promote their anti-Britishness.[/quote]

    Indeed. It would hardly be very fair for people to vent their spleen towards Britain now for something that occurred over 160 years ago. Nor was it the fault of ordinary English people then or now. Having said that, I fear it won't stop some on here for doing just that.
    If you continue to elect idiots in elections, don't be surprised when the result is an idiotic government.

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member Eirenua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    280
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Read " The Great Hunger" Woodham-Smith, Cecil. A well documented and researched book. The approach by the British to the Famine was disgraceful. The main culprits were Trevelyan, Routh & Lord John Russell and the heartless Irish landlords. The British adopted a laissez faire view and in 1848 Trevelyn wrote in a letter to Routh " Ireland is on her own,we can do no more for her, let the Famine take it's natural course". Yes it was Genocide.
    There are Men, there are Women and there are Politicians. God save old Ireland

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Workstation 2075
    Posts
    171
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    they didn't adopt a laissez faire attitude because we were irish, that was the attidude of all govts of the day. no govt had a social welfare policy in the 1850s. the govts role in the day, pretty much was to administer justice (brutally the world over) and maintain an army/navy.
    Not being able to govern events, I govern myself. -Michel de Montaigne, essayist (1533-1592)

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I like mashed potatoes and chips.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    48
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eirenua
    Read " The Great Hunger" Woodham-Smith, Cecil. A well documented and researched book. The approach by the British to the Famine was disgraceful. The main culprits were Trevelyan, Routh & Lord John Russell and the heartless Irish landlords. The British adopted a laissez faire view and in 1848 Trevelyn wrote in a letter to Routh " Ireland is on her own,we can do no more for her, let the Famine take it's natural course". Yes it was Genocide.
    It's a very long time indeed since I read that book but I don't remember the author ( or indeed, any serious historian, then or now) concluding that the Famine was an act of genocide. If I remember correctly, Woodham-Smith said that although the authorities had been callous and hardhearted in the extreme in their handling of it, it was difficult to see what else they coulld have done given the times and the circumstances ?.

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member Aindriu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Somewhere up in the Wicklow mountains digging an even deeper nuclear shelter
    Posts
    8,689
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    This is quite a good site.
    If you continue to elect idiots in elections, don't be surprised when the result is an idiotic government.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,052
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zakalwe
    they didn't adopt a laissez faire attitude because we were irish, that was the attidude of all govts of the day. no govt had a social welfare policy in the 1850s. the govts role in the day, pretty much was to administer justice (brutally the world over) and maintain an army/navy.
    Agreed - Karl Marx was only getting around to writing his ideas at this time so you simply cannot look back with modern values in mind.

    The famine was a tragedy - an socio-economic tragedy - it wasnt the first - there were at least 4 - 5 similar "famines" here in the 70 years leading up to the Great famine - it was the final nail in the coffin of subsistence farming depending on one crop and it primarily effected those areas where the soil was poorest and the land had been so divided and divided and the pop had so multiplied and still stayed on the land - yes our obssession with the land is nothing new - the same thing happened in Eastern Europe ,scandanavia and southern Europe in the latter part of the 19th century so our experience is not at all unique - but every culture ,particularly a marthyr self pitying culture like our own ,imagines their suffering to be unique and unparalleled.

    Of course it could and should be said the British economic policy did not help matters - then again we never really helped ourselves either - something that is still with us down to this day.

    It was a massive tragedy and it seared itself onto our national consience and its outcome laid the foundation for the state we live in today. - A great tragedy - but as hard as it will be for the great many posters here who suffer from CBHD (Compulsive Brit Hating Disorder) - it was not genocide and certainly not a holocaust - to admit so would be a gross insult to those have perished in such monstrosities , ie the Jews, Armenians and Rwandans etc etc.

Page 1 of 48 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •