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Thread: "Taking the soup"

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    Politics.ie Member diy01's Avatar
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    Default "Taking the soup"

    Does the phrase refer solely to those who renounced their faith in exhange for food during the Famine years? Or was it also used for people who dropped the O or Mc/Mac from their surname (if they had one to drop....or if they adopted the Anglicized version of their name).

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    um is it answer b ? can i phone a friend?

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    Only heard it in relation to option A. The whole country was dropping the O out of their name.

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    Politics.ie Member diy01's Avatar
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    More or less. I remember reading a little tidbit about surnames awhile back. Around 1851 only 1% of surnames bearing the name Kelly were using the O'Kelly form.

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    Refers to both so far as I am aware, but in most instances to the taking of the soup. Which of course refers to the dishing out of meat soup on a Friday (to those who are not aware, at that time Catholics did not eat meat on a Friday) thus in order to do so, they were encouraged to renounce their faith.

    Get in touch with Irish Church Missions down on Bachelor's Walk (www.icm-online.ie) if you want to know more. Don't know if in the modern day they'd have any record of it, but it was those lads who were at it.

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    Politics.ie Newbie pikey's Avatar
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    well as alan partridge said "if youre a fussy eater etc.."

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    I know that the Quakers did a huge amount of famine relief work particularly in the West and they set up a number of soup kitchens but there is no record of people being 'required' to relinquish their faith in order to be saved from starvation. And only a lunatic would refuse to allow a starving child a bowl of soup with meat in it.
    'It would be a fine memorial to the men who have died so splendidly if we could, over their graves, build a bridge between North and South...' Major Wille Redmond MP, 1917

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    All Irish names at one time started with an O or a MC so what you are saying makes no sense.
    In Northern Ireland the term refers to somebody with a Catholic name but is a Protestant. Its pretty much myth in most instances that people were forced to renounce their Catholicism in order to get food during the famine.
    Some families just converted such as Brian Borus descendants. They kept their land as well. Also many of the servants and hangers-on converted as well. The most famous "Souper" of course was Terence O'Neill.

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    Politics.ie Member diy01's Avatar
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    All Irish names at one time started with an O or a MC so what you are saying makes no sense.
    Huh? Well there was sure a lot of O and Mc dropping going on. No idea if it had anything to do with the Famine years though.

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    It didnt. During the Downs Survey of Ireland a huge amount of surnames were anglicised. That is where the O and Mc were lost in certain areas. The name Ryan , O Ryan and Mulryan all derive from O'Maoilriaghain.
    They were turned into English at different times and in different places from different Irish dialects thence the names become slightly different in English.

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