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Thread: Article : Garda appeal over Saulite killing

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    Default Article : Garda appeal over Saulite killing

    The Gardai are appealing on the anniversary of the death of Baiba Saulite for witnesses to her murder. Yesterday the Sunday World ran with an article on the solicitor who handled Baiba Saulites affairs with regard to custody of her children. This solicitor currently has a contract out against his life. He currently lives under constant armed Garda protection and claims to wear a bullet proof vest.

    I heard second hand of radio interviews last week with witnesses in cases taken against powerful Limerick criminals. These people complained that they had been named in the papers after previously being promised anonymity. I know that when I was called to witness in the district court recently I had concerns about having my name and address being read out.

    How can the Gardai expect witnesses in the Baiba Saulite trial to come forward when the protections for witnesses are so weak in this country? Are they expected to live under constant Garda protection for the rest of their lives? We can talk about it being the 'right thing to do', but is it really when you are putting your own life and that of your family at risk?

    IT Link (Subscription Required): http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/irelan ... 31262.html
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    Politics.ie Member The OD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Article : Garda appeal over Saulite killing

    Quote Originally Posted by HanleyS
    The Gardai are appealing on the anniversary of the death of Baiba Saulite for witnesses to her murder. Yesterday the Sunday World ran with an article on the solicitor who handled Baiba Saulites affairs with regard to custody of her children. This solicitor currently has a contract out against his life. He currently lives under constant armed Garda protection and claims to wear a bullet proof vest.

    I heard second hand of radio interviews last week with witnesses in cases taken against powerful Limerick criminals. These people complained that they had been named in the papers after previously being promised anonymity. I know that when I was called to witness in the district court recently I had concerns about having my name and address being read out.

    How can the Gardai expect witnesses in the Baiba Saulite trial to come forward when the protections for witnesses are so weak in this country? Are they expected to live under constant Garda protection for the rest of their lives? We can talk about it being the 'right thing to do', but is it really when you are putting your own life and that of your family at risk?

    IT Link (Subscription Required): http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/irelan ... 31262.html
    All the talk of 'doing the right thing' and 'nobility' etc is all fine in a hollywood movie, but the way things are going at the moment, I think anyone who gives evidence against these coked up scum are nuts.

    Something has to be done, I mean look at the UK and the US amongst others? Surely we cant allow a situation whereby criminals walk (and a ffew have already walked).

    It cant continue. :x
    Let's all raise a glass of frog milk to the ancient festival of Fargaltide!

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    The Garda have made two arrests today. There job would be a lot easier if people felt they could talk. It must be very frustrating.
    http://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/mhmhqlaugbgb/

    At least there's justice for the family of this young woman. Too late for her though:
    http://www.breakingnews.ie/ireland/mhmhqlauidid/
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    I pointed out before, on another thread, that the way to deal with these bol1ock's is to increase sentences, significantly, ensure the Judges discretion is narrowed by increasing minimum terms and making it easier to impose custodial punishment by the prison govoner lenghtening sentences and providing for greater use of solitary cells, no tv, radio, access to visitor's/drugs, mobile phones etc.
    Reliance on 'Human rights' legislation is putting the rights of the victim below those of the perpatrator.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Walsh
    I pointed out before, on another thread, that the way to deal with these bol1ock's is to increase sentences, significantly, ensure the Judges discretion is narrowed by increasing minimum terms and making it easier to impose custodial punishment by the prison govoner lenghtening sentences and providing for greater use of solitary cells, no tv, radio, access to visitor's/drugs, mobile phones etc.
    Reliance on 'Human rights' legislation is putting the rights of the victim below those of the perpatrator.
    Imagine how the libertarians would squeal if convicted felons had their sentences automatically lengthened for criminal infractions while under the supervision of the state.
    Imagine how the average person would cheer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Walsh
    I pointed out before, on another thread, that the way to deal with these bol1ock's is to increase sentences, significantly, ensure the Judges discretion is narrowed by increasing minimum terms and making it easier to impose custodial punishment by the prison govoner lenghtening sentences and providing for greater use of solitary cells, no tv, radio, access to visitor's/drugs, mobile phones etc.
    Reliance on 'Human rights' legislation is putting the rights of the victim below those of the perpatrator.
    Inceasing imprisonment rates does nothing than serve as a social function whereby it provides a superficial safety net where people can sleep soundly in their beds under the false impression that the crime issue is being dealt with and will subsequently lead to a reduction in crime rates. Prisons dont deter/stop crime,more often than not they are better than the places where the criminal came from in the first place. You need to tackle the problem of what causes crime in the first place, and eliminating as best as possible those conditions. (That doesnt include solitary confinement as its completely ineffective at reducing criminal behaviour)

    You need proper services in prisons, effective rehabilition methods that could possibly combine both the perpetrator and victim and making the criminal responsible for its actions enforcing accountablility and responsibility. Im not suggesting getting rid of prisons, but rather providing better facilities that allow the criminals to understand what they've done. The majority of criminals dont have such an understanding. Also by locking someone up and then releasing them after they've served their sentence into the same enviroment that caused them to be imprisoned in the first place needs to be addressed. Thats not alleviating the problem. Its actually just creating an even bigger culture of crime.

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    The chief suspect in this case is currently in prison. He is alleged to have orchestrated the killing from prison. Prison sentences don't protect witnesses.
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    Covered at length in the Sunday Times today. Shameful story. Behind a paywall unfort.
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by He3 View Post
    Covered at length in the Sunday Times today. Shameful story. Behind a paywall unfort.
    Hope the ST is more accurate with this story than the GSOC "bugging" fairytale

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    Quote Originally Posted by He3 View Post
    Covered at length in the Sunday Times today. Shameful story. Behind a paywall unfort.
    Whats to cover?

    Man from.male.dominated, macho culture is enraged that a woman stands between him and absolute control of his children.
    To rectify this slight to his ego, he arranges to have the woman eliminated.

    not sufficient evidence for a court case resulting in a conviction.
    The facts and nothing but the facts.

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