Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 26 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 254

Thread: Unique Irish expressions, colloquialisms and pronunciations

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member Drogheda445's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Drawda
    Posts
    6,517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Unique Irish expressions, colloquialisms and pronunciations

    Following on from a similar thread concerning archaic expressions that have fallen out of use (the creator of which has now sadly moved on from P.ie):

    http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture...c-phrases.html

    ...perhaps it would be interesting to have a similar discussion, this time on expressions which are unique to Ireland, or certain parts of it. Hiberno-English, or Irish English, includes a number of peculiarities which many other English-speakers find incomprehensible or old-fashioned, many of them rooted in the Irish language or in Old English.

    - Using "ye" as a pluralisation of you.
    - Using the word "footpath" to mean "pavement" in British English or "sidewalk" in American English
    - "Acting the maggot", or being immature.
    - Spelling whiskey with an e, which is spelt without one in other dialects of English
    - Pronouncing "r" as "orr", which is pronounced "arr" in other countries
    - "Lashing rain"
    - "Hot press"
    - "Get up the yard!"

    Listed above are some examples. Feel free to add your own.

    PS If the mods intend to move this to the "chat" forum, feel free to do so, although a number of similar threads (including the one linked above) were kept on the main board.

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member daveL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    19,569
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Pavement is a colloquialism as well no?

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member Drogheda445's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Drawda
    Posts
    6,517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daveL View Post
    Pavement is a colloquialism as well no?
    It is.

    A few more:

    "Amn't"
    "A rake of..."

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    22,153
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    A wean of. ... As in children

    A lock of. ..... As in pints
    #3amigos

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    17,116
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post

    Listed above are some examples. Feel free to add your own.

    PS If the mods intend to move this to the "chat" forum, feel free to do so, although a number of similar threads (including the one linked above) were kept on the main board.
    I will ya!
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member 'orebel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    In corrigible
    Posts
    20,132
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)

    Default

    Mental reservation.
    "It is important therefore that I clarify to the House that in the first instance there are significant monies within Anglo-Irish to take the strain of loan losses arising over the next three or four years, before State support is engaged." Brian Lenihan 15/01/09

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Cellach's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,083
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    Following on from a similar thread concerning archaic expressions that have fallen out of use (the creator of which has now sadly moved on from P.ie):

    http://www.politics.ie/forum/culture...c-phrases.html

    ...perhaps it would be interesting to have a similar discussion, this time on expressions which are unique to Ireland, or certain parts of it. Hiberno-English, or Irish English, includes a number of peculiarities which many other English-speakers find incomprehensible or old-fashioned, many of them rooted in the Irish language or in Old English.

    - Using "ye" as a pluralisation of you.
    - Using the word "footpath" to mean "pavement" in British English or "sidewalk" in American English
    - "Acting the maggot", or being immature.
    - Spelling whiskey with an e, which is spelt without one in other dialects of English
    - Pronouncing "r" as "orr", which is pronounced "arr" in other countries
    - "Lashing rain"
    - "Hot press"
    - "Get up the yard!"

    Listed above are some examples. Feel free to add your own.

    PS If the mods intend to move this to the "chat" forum, feel free to do so, although a number of similar threads (including the one linked above) were kept on the main board.
    The Field Marshal is gone? Balls.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Crook County
    Posts
    2,164
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cellach View Post
    The Field Marshal is gone? Balls.
    He's "away with the fairies"
    Another brick in the wall.

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member The Eagle of the Ninth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Glens of Antrim Coven
    Posts
    76,731
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Well do Nordies count?

    First of all it's not ye: it's "Youse" as in " Youse are nathin but a load of whiners, so youse are". Remember the emphatic "so" - used to underline the main verb in a statement "It's rainin', so it is."

    "I'n starved" - not hungry in its primary meaning but cold. Viz the following taken down by your observer in Belfast whose subject was a young woman clad in skimpy attire outside a chip shop in January: "I'm starved so I am and I'm starved too waitin' for me supper.".

    "Doon the bray" - the "bray" is a road of any kind. You live up or doon a bray and it does not depend on the perspective of the speaker.Or occasionally at the "back of a bray". That signals oddity. "Doon the red bray" ie the throat is a means of encouraging fussy children to eat their spuds or broccoli or whatever.

    Let me see. "Feth-sowls-eye" : an absolute classic. From the Elizabethan "By the faith of my soul, aye". Used to mean: it;s the Gods honest truth..

    The major threat: "See you, boy". Nothing else. No other words. When i first watched Robert de Niro, do his celebrated turn in Taxi Driver - "are you looking at me?". it struck me as paltry compared to the cold menace of "See you, boy". No - not looking at ME, Robbie, sweetie , you great big gorgeous bundle of Latin cuddles - it's lookin at YOU

    And of course, all the good old Northern phrases to do with bodily functions which interest us enormously: " bowk" (vomit) "Yous'd make a cat bowk so youse would", "scutter" meaning diarrohea but used as a metaphor "I seed your man on the UTV scutterin' from his mouth, the wild shyte he was comin' out with" about a politican for example and "full as a po" ie a chamber pot for someone who's drunk. "Pished, full as a po and scutterin - Jesus he'd make youse bowk, so he would."

    Now if you don't appreciate this post, you're not ready for a United Ireland. 'Cos if you get one, you'll have to get used to this
    Plotting the witchcraft with my cats.

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member Drogheda445's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Drawda
    Posts
    6,517
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    "Runners" for sneakers or trainers
    "Pairer" for pencil sharpeners

Page 1 of 26 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •