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Thread: Health reforms - do Troika believe Reilly is failing???

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    Politics.ie Member paulp's Avatar
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    Default Health reforms - do Troika believe Reilly is failing???

    Personally, I think Reilly puts his foot in his mouth way too often, but his current brief is a huge challenge that hasn't had a good minister in the last 20 years (that I can think of anyway)

    I would be prepared to leave Reilly there for another year or two, partially in the belief that there is reform going on and it's a slow process.

    However, this report in today's Irish Times
    Troika unease at pace of health reforms - Political News | Irish & International Politics | The Irish Times - Tue, Jun 04, 2013
    makes me worry a bit (more).

    The structural reforms that the Troika demand I believe are extremely difficult domestically for politicians, but I believe are in general for the betterment of the country.

    The issues they raise here are
    - Consultants still overpaid
    - Hospitals not charging enough for private beds
    - We spend too much on drugs

    As I said, I'm prepared to give a health minister 3-4 years as with any reform of the health sector, there is a long lead time, and some of the noises that we've been hearing lead me to believe that a lot of the ground work is underway. But if the Troika are expressing these concerns, it makes me start to wonder if Reilly is really going to deliver.
    There is no Keyser Soze

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    Politics.ie Member dammit_im_mad's Avatar
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    Health reforms - do Troika care Reilly is failing???

    there....fixed that for you!

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    Politics.ie Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulp View Post
    Personally, I think Reilly puts his foot in his mouth way too often, but his current brief is a huge challenge that hasn't had a good minister in the last 20 years (that I can think of anyway)

    I would be prepared to leave Reilly there for another year or two, partially in the belief that there is reform going on and it's a slow process.

    However, this report in today's Irish Times
    Troika unease at pace of health reforms - Political News | Irish & International Politics | The Irish Times - Tue, Jun 04, 2013
    makes me worry a bit (more).

    The structural reforms that the Troika demand I believe are extremely difficult domestically for politicians, but I believe are in general for the betterment of the country.

    The issues they raise here are
    - Consultants still overpaid
    - Hospitals not charging enough for private beds
    - We spend too much on drugs

    As I said, I'm prepared to give a health minister 3-4 years as with any reform of the health sector, there is a long lead time, and some of the noises that we've been hearing lead me to believe that a lot of the ground work is underway. But if the Troika are expressing these concerns, it makes me start to wonder if Reilly is really going to deliver.
    B..B..But surely if we reduce the cost of the health service then the cost of private beds should fall too?
    and
    I'll heed the Troika moaning about Consultants' salaries if they can demonstrate that they themselves earn less.
    and
    Before we hear any more about the cost of drugs, we need a clear indication as to whether this is influenced by the need to keep the Pharma's sweet. And if it is, then part of the drug costs should be charged to the appropriate budget, not to the healthcare budget.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dammit_im_mad View Post
    Health reforms - do Troika care Reilly is failing???
    Do delegates who stay in the Merrion hotel care that we have a three tier health system? Perhaps they want the use of medical cards restricted. They might not be fans of the fact that we use of health service to subsidise our pharma con industry. They might not even like the earnings of GPs relative to their workload, experience and location of practice. Perhaps they find it amusing that new consultants will be omitted from Haddington Road. Who knows? They are at the end of their mission. Contracts will be met. Debts will be paid. Job done. The obedient state is in good shape (leaving aside high debt to GDP, provision of public service relative to tax, sme sector, and our tax haven status finally exposed.)

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    Politics.ie Member Spanner Island's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulp View Post
    Personally, I think Reilly puts his foot in his mouth way too often, but his current brief is a huge challenge that hasn't had a good minister in the last 20 years (that I can think of anyway)
    In fairness it's probably not possible to have a good minister in something as fund thirsty and as plagued with vested interests as the health service is...

    Ministers come and go while the 'system' and its poxy vested interest guardians remain firmly in situ...

    Reilly was an arrogant smug loud mouth in Opposition though... so while it's depressing to see the health service continue as it has done for years and decades... the upshot is watching Reilly flounder...

    I would be prepared to leave Reilly there for another year or two, partially in the belief that there is reform going on and it's a slow process.

    However, this report in today's Irish Times
    Troika unease at pace of health reforms - Political News | Irish & International Politics | The Irish Times - Tue, Jun 04, 2013
    makes me worry a bit (more).

    The structural reforms that the Troika demand I believe are extremely difficult domestically for politicians, but I believe are in general for the betterment of the country.

    The issues they raise here are
    - Consultants still overpaid
    - Hospitals not charging enough for private beds
    - We spend too much on drugs

    As I said, I'm prepared to give a health minister 3-4 years as with any reform of the health sector, there is a long lead time, and some of the noises that we've been hearing lead me to believe that a lot of the ground work is underway. But if the Troika are expressing these concerns, it makes me start to wonder if Reilly is really going to deliver.
    Reform has been painfully slow in this country since the sh!t hit the fan back in 2006 and then went ballistic in 2008...

    7 years it's been since the Irish economy started heading towards a cliff... even if Cowen and Co. didn't admit anything was up until 2 years later...

    The extent of reform in those 7 years has been nothing other than abysmal and pathetic...

    Personally I'm surprised the Troika have been as patient as they have... but then as long as targets have been hit they've been happy enough to indulge our Irish solutions... which basically seem to have consisted of screwing middle Ireland to the wall while those in the 'establishment', at the top and at the bottom have been protected from contributing anything at all...

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    Politics.ie Member damus's Avatar
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    Can someone please explain the logic behind why anyone should be getting billed €1,046 for private, €933 for semi-private or €753 for daycare, when we're all blooming well entitled to avail of public services which only incurs a cost of €75 per night up to a max of €750 per year?

    As for the actual reforms that has happened to date ie, has been implemented - would anyone care to list them?

    There's a whole thread on healthcare reform already.

    http://www.politics.ie/forum/health-...form-sigh.html

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    Politics.ie Member emulator's Avatar
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    They have the Taoiseach watching him and they have him reporting once a month.

    That shows what they think of Reilly....

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    Quote Originally Posted by damus View Post
    Can someone please explain the logic behind why anyone should be getting billed €1,046 for private, €933 for semi-private or €753 for daycare, when we're all blooming well entitled to avail of public services which only incurs a cost of €75 per night up to a max of €750 per year?

    As for the actual reforms that has happened to date ie, has been implemented - would anyone care to list them?

    There's a whole thread on healthcare reform already.

    http://www.politics.ie/forum/health-...form-sigh.html
    It is time to start asking exactly what benefit you get for paying taxes. My neighbour can get tax relief at the higher rate for donations made to an animal charity or to a group who promotes superstitious beliefs.

    My neighbour can have his alcoholism treated on his health insurance, while my nephew's autism is not eligible for treatment on health insurance.

    Why should holding health insurance disqualify you for State funded treatment. Those with health insurance must now pay for the health insurance of others without insurance as well as fund their own health care through insurance.

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