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Thread: The Germans Are Really Too Good - Thatís Why People Conspire Against Them (JFK)

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    Default The Germans Are Really Too Good - Thatís Why People Conspire Against Them (JFK)

    Interesting piece of history in the independent last week. Was John FKennedy a Adolf Hitler admirer?

    While touring Germany and visiting the river Rhine in 1937 John F Kennedy notes: ďVery beautiful, because there are many castles along the route. The towns are all charming which shows that the Nordic races appear to be definitely superior to their Latin counterparts. The Germans are really too good Ė thatís why people conspire against them Ė they do it to protect themselves.Ē

    and he goes on to state

    "I have come to the conclusion that fascism is right for Germany and Italy. What are the evils of fascism compared to communism?"

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    Politics.ie Member Little_Korean's Avatar
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    Sounds a bit of a sensationalist article, IMO.

    Many people were admiring, whether publicly or in private, of what fascism was believed to be able to accomplish. Churchill spoke admiringly of Mussolini in the '30s and I don't think anyone would accuse Churchill today of being pro-fascist.

    Kennedy’s writings do not reveal whether he was influenced by his anti-Semitic, pro-Nazi father Joseph, who was US ambassador to London in the late 1930s and regarded by the Nazis as “Germany’s best friend in London”.
    Pro-Nazi is too strong a term - he definitely thought Britain was done and it was best for the US to adjust to that fact. As it turned out, history proved him wrong, but it was not an unreasonable assumption to make at the time.

    As for the anti-semitic bit, as in, more so than mainstream belief in the US at the time, where Jewish-Americans were prominent in many parts of American life but still couldn't join many country clubs?

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    Dylan2010
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    on a lighter note apparently it was British manufacturing companies that brought in the rule about "Made in Germany" in the 19th C , it then became a selling point I hope this isn't an urban myth

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    JFK's father certainly was an admirer of Hitler and an anti semite. I didn't think his son espoused the same warped views on Hitler and Jewish people.

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little_Korean View Post
    Churchill spoke admiringly of Mussolini in the '30s and I don't think anyone would accuse Churchill today of being pro-fascist.
    ''I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes.''
    Yes, that doesn't sound fascist at all.
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little_Korean View Post

    Pro-Nazi is too strong a term - he definitely thought Britain was done and it was best for the US to adjust to that fact. As it turned out, history proved him wrong, but it was not an unreasonable assumption to make at the time.
    What a principled man.
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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    Politics.ie Member Colin M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by james5001 View Post
    ''I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes.''
    Yes, that doesn't sound fascist at all.
    He is a major beneficiary of modern historical revisionism.

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    Politics.ie Member twokidsmanybruises's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little_Korean View Post
    Sounds a bit of a sensationalist article, IMO.

    Many people were admiring, whether publicly or in private, of what fascism was believed to be able to accomplish. Churchill spoke admiringly of Mussolini in the '30s and I don't think anyone would accuse Churchill today of being pro-fascist.



    Pro-Nazi is too strong a term - he definitely thought Britain was done and it was best for the US to adjust to that fact. As it turned out, history proved him wrong, but it was not an unreasonable assumption to make at the time.

    As for the anti-semitic bit, as in, more so than mainstream belief in the US at the time, where Jewish-Americans were prominent in many parts of American life but still couldn't join many country clubs?
    I'd agree with you here. Hindsight is a dangerous thing and is itself revisionism. Trying to argue that fascism is a good thing is an uphill battle ( not that I'd do so ), but pre-holocaust, fascism and anti-semitism was not seen as "A Bad Thing" by the majority of politicians, Even if they disagreed in private, it would have been politically expedient to keep an "open mind", at least in public.

    H.G. Wells was considered a radical in his own time because of his views on equality for African-Americans, but reading his opinions today, and judging those opinions by today's standards, it'd be easy to assume that he'd have little problem with putting a freshly-washed pillowcase over his head.

    People can only be judged by the attitudes of their time, not by the attitude of our time.

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    Politics.ie Member Little_Korean's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by james5001 View Post
    ''I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilised tribes.''
    Yes, that doesn't sound fascist at all.
    Only if you take a definition of fascism that's so broad as to be utterly meaningless.

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    Politics.ie Member Analyzer's Avatar
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    there always was an obsession in the Dumbocratic party with race....
    Coveney's ambition is the be Ireland's next EU Commissar and Ireland will pay a price as he builds his CV to position himself sufficiently loyal to the nEU empire.

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