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Thread: 17th May 1974, Two Irish Towns - Major Slaughter, Minor Investigation

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    Default 17th May 1974, Two Irish Towns - Major Slaughter, Minor Investigation

    17th May 1974. Ireland.

    The Fine Gael/Labour government of the day was characterised by an uncompromising stance against ‘the men of violence’. Leading Fine Gael figures like Paddy Donegan and Paddy Cooney were seen to have been pro-active types, with Cooney ordering that the grave of IRA hunger striker Frank Stagg be cemented over. Their coalition colleague Conor Cruise O'Brien later recounted a conversation he had with a detective at the time in which the detective gave an account of a republican prisoner having "the sh1t beaten out of him". Cruise O'Brien recalled keeping the information away from Garrett Fitzgerald and Justin Keating "because I thought it would worry them. It didn’t worry me".

    Then, when Donegan went so far as to denigrate the President, Cearbhaill O’Dalaigh, his colleagues circled the wagons around him, leading to the President’s resignation. Clearly, this was a government with close contacts with the forces of law and order, and a government led by men who didn't stand idly by.

    However, when several bombs exploded without warning in the evening rush hour on that Friday thirty nine years ago, killing dozens of children, women and men in Dublin and Monaghan, the forces of law and order of the state began an investigation which was terminated after a few weeks. No substantial steps were taken to bring to the killers to justice, while several steps were taken which effectively ensured their escape from justice.

    Not only were the bereaved and the injured insulted in this way, but most of the evidence was removed from the ‘safekeeping’ of the state at later dates and, presumably, destroyed.

    Clearly, there were other atrocities throughout the conflict in which many innocent people died. However, in the cases of deaths resulting from republican actions it is impossible to conceive that any were subject to remotely as weak an investigation as were the Dublin and Monaghan Bombings.

    Some questions arise:

    1. Why would our forces of law and order abandon after a few weeks one of the worst crimes in the history of the state.

    2. Is there any similar case in modern European history, in which an investigation into a mass-murder is so rapidly abandoned by forces of law and order.

    3. Why would employees of the state remove and destroy most of the evidence in this case while it was being held by that state in otherwise secure locations.

    4. Is it plausible that the government of the day would have had no role or capacity to encourage the forces of law and order to continue the investigation beyond a few weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onlyasking View Post
    17th May 1974. Ireland.

    The Fine Gael/Labour government of the day was characterised by an uncompromising stance against ‘the men of violence’. Leading Fine Gael figures like Paddy Donegan and Paddy Cooney were seen to have been pro-active types, with Cooney ordering that the grave of IRA hunger striker Frank Stagg be cemented over. Their coalition colleague Conor Cruise O'Brien later recounted a conversation he had with a detective at the time in which the detective gave an account of a republican prisoner having "the sh1t beaten out of him". Cruise O'Brien recalled keeping the information away from Garrett Fitzgerald and Justin Keating "because I thought it would worry them. It didn’t worry me".

    Then, when Donegan went so far as to denigrate the President, Cearbhaill O’Dalaigh, his colleagues circled the wagons around him, leading to the President’s resignation. Clearly, this was a government with close contacts with the forces of law and order, and a government led by men who didn't stand idly by.

    However, when several bombs exploded without warning in the evening rush hour on that Friday thirty nine years ago, killing dozens of children, women and men in Dublin and Monaghan, the forces of law and order of the state began an investigation which was terminated after a few weeks. No substantial steps were taken to bring to the killers to justice, while several steps were taken which effectively ensured their escape from justice.

    Not only were the bereaved and the injured insulted in this way, but most of the evidence was removed from the ‘safekeeping’ of the state at later dates and, presumably, destroyed.

    Clearly, there were other atrocities throughout the conflict in which many innocent people died. However, in the cases of deaths resulting from republican actions it is impossible to conceive that any were subject to remotely as weak an investigation as were the Dublin and Monaghan Bombings.

    Some questions arise:

    1. Why would our forces of law and order abandon after a few weeks one of the worst crimes in the history of the state.

    2. Is there any similar case in modern European history, in which an investigation into a mass-murder is so rapidly abandoned by forces of law and order.

    3. Why would employees of the state remove and destroy most of the evidence in this case while it was being held by that state in otherwise secure locations.

    4. Is it plausible that the government of the day would have had no role or capacity to encourage the forces of law and order to continue the investigation beyond a few weeks.
    Not one reply to a post on the anniversary of the worst mass murder of the Troubles. Says it all really: no investigation, no-one questioned, no arrests, no charges, no sentences, no diciplinary action; no state commemorations; no day of mourning; no rallies by "peace" activists. No wonder the bereaved families call it the Forgotten Massacre.



    When will there be Justice For The Forgotten?

    Patrick Askin (44) Co. Monaghan
    Josie Bradley (21) Co. Offaly
    Marie Butler (21) Co. Waterford
    Anne Byrne (35) Dublin
    Thomas Campbell (52) Co. Monaghan
    Simone Chetrit (30) France
    Thomas Croarkin (36) Co. Monaghan
    John Dargle (80) Dublin
    Concepta Dempsey (65) Co. Louth
    Colette Doherty (20) Dublin
    Baby Doherty (full term unborn) Dublin*
    Patrick Fay (47), Dublin & Co. Louth
    Elizabeth Fitzgerald (59) Dublin
    Breda Bernadette Grace (34) Dublin and Co. Kerry
    Archie Harper (73) Co. Monaghan
    Antonio Magliocco, (37) Dublin & Italy
    May McKenna (55) Co. Tyrone
    Anne Marren (20) Co. Sligo
    Anna Massey (21) Dublin
    Dorothy Morris (57) Dublin
    John (24), Anna (22), Jacqueline (17 months) & Anne-Marie (5 months) O'Brien, Dublin
    Christina O'Loughlin (51), Dublin
    Edward John O'Neill (39), Dublin
    Marie Phelan (20), Co. Waterford
    Siobhán Roice (19), Wexford Town
    Maureen Shields (46), Dublin
    Jack Travers (28), Monaghan Town
    Breda Turner (21), Co. Tipperary
    John Walsh (27), Dublin
    Peggy White (44), Monaghan Town
    George Williamson (72), Co. Monaghan
    *Baby Doherty was recognised as the 34th victim of the Bombings by the Coroner for the City of Dublin during the course of the Inquests held in April and May 2004

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    Not a peep from the usual snivelling shoneens.

    And then they get all pompous and offended when Northerners view the gombeen statelet with contempt. Horrible little cesspit of a pretend country full of horrible reactionary nasty little crawlers, servile wannabe jackbooted gimps only too happy to see their own supposed countrymen dead or suffering while they fawn over the killers and oppressors.

    "Against violence", "law-abiding", "democratic"? Me feckin hole they are. Outrageous and blatant lying hypocrites the lot of 'em.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onlyasking View Post
    17th May 1974. Ireland.

    Some questions arise:

    1. Why would our forces of law and order abandon after a few weeks one of the worst crimes in the history of the state.

    2. Is there any similar case in modern European history, in which an investigation into a mass-murder is so rapidly abandoned by forces of law and order.

    3. Why would employees of the state remove and destroy most of the evidence in this case while it was being held by that state in otherwise secure locations.

    4. Is it plausible that the government of the day would have had no role or capacity to encourage the forces of law and order to continue the investigation beyond a few weeks.
    Another question that has never been explained:

    - How was a supposed UVF group able to mount a bombing operation to a level of sophistication never shown before or after by any Loyalist outfit during the entire history of the Troubles?

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    Per Capita, Loyalists have killed more citizens in the 26 counties than the IRA have killed in their 40 year England Campaign.
    However, unlike the IRA's long list of prisoners in English jails, not a SINGLE case of Loyalist terror and bombings was resolved by the Gardai.
    This is not negligence, but rather a political decision.
    Even when the RUC arrested a Loyalist with the guns that killed Eddie Fullerton, they didn't make even an attempt to have him extradited. Not even for a cup of tea and a few questions.
    Zero interest in having cases solved that involved Loyalists.
    Last edited by Truth.ie; 17th May 2013 at 06:46 AM.

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    Politics.ie Member Eire1976's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onlyasking View Post
    17th May 1974. Ireland.

    The Fine Gael/Labour government of the day was characterised by an uncompromising stance against ‘the men of violence’. Leading Fine Gael figures like Paddy Donegan and Paddy Cooney were seen to have been pro-active types, with Cooney ordering that the grave of IRA hunger striker Frank Stagg be cemented over. Their coalition colleague Conor Cruise O'Brien later recounted a conversation he had with a detective at the time in which the detective gave an account of a republican prisoner having "the sh1t beaten out of him". Cruise O'Brien recalled keeping the information away from Garrett Fitzgerald and Justin Keating "because I thought it would worry them. It didn’t worry me".

    Then, when Donegan went so far as to denigrate the President, Cearbhaill O’Dalaigh, his colleagues circled the wagons around him, leading to the President’s resignation. Clearly, this was a government with close contacts with the forces of law and order, and a government led by men who didn't stand idly by.

    However, when several bombs exploded without warning in the evening rush hour on that Friday thirty nine years ago, killing dozens of children, women and men in Dublin and Monaghan, the forces of law and order of the state began an investigation which was terminated after a few weeks. No substantial steps were taken to bring to the killers to justice, while several steps were taken which effectively ensured their escape from justice.

    Not only were the bereaved and the injured insulted in this way, but most of the evidence was removed from the ‘safekeeping’ of the state at later dates and, presumably, destroyed.

    Clearly, there were other atrocities throughout the conflict in which many innocent people died. However, in the cases of deaths resulting from republican actions it is impossible to conceive that any were subject to remotely as weak an investigation as were the Dublin and Monaghan Bombings.

    Some questions arise:

    1. Why would our forces of law and order abandon after a few weeks one of the worst crimes in the history of the state.

    2. Is there any similar case in modern European history, in which an investigation into a mass-murder is so rapidly abandoned by forces of law and order.

    3. Why would employees of the state remove and destroy most of the evidence in this case while it was being held by that state in otherwise secure locations.

    4. Is it plausible that the government of the day would have had no role or capacity to encourage the forces of law and order to continue the investigation beyond a few weeks.
    The reason it was abandoned is because it led back to British intelligence and to report that would have meant War.

    FG/Lab are also full of British agents.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Truth.ie View Post
    Per Capita, Loyalists have killed more citizens in the 26 counties than the IRA have killed in their 40 year England Campaign.
    However, unlike the IRA's long list of prisoners in English jails, not a SINGLE case of Loyalist terror and bombings was resolved by the Gardai.
    This is not negligence, but rather a political decision.
    Even when the RUC arrested a Loyalist with the guns that killed Eddie Fullerton, they didn't make even an attempt to have him extradited. Not even for a cup of tea and a few questions.
    Zero interest in having cases solved that involved Loyalists.
    I understand that a Loyalist possibly named Wilkinson was caught in Dublin when an incendiary device went off in his pocket. He was convicted but for some unknown reason was transferred back to the North to finish his sentence. Mysterious behaviour

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    It is difficult to be outraged by events of forty years ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DimplesBro View Post
    The Irish State doesn't tackle loyalists full stop.

    We allow them to run our media, fill our Dail benches, why would we lock them up?
    And used taxpayers money to pay for expert media trainers for UDA leaders.

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    Quote Originally Posted by captainwillard View Post
    It is difficult to be outraged by events of forty years ago.
    That's brilliant. Absolutely fncking brilliant.

    Army deserters? Ring a bell? It's quite prominent on this forum at the moment. And that was 70 years ago.

    And okay, I'll be the first to say it, Jean McConville.

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