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Thread: Dublin could become a centre for US technology IPOs (initial public offerings)

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    Default Dublin could become a centre for US technology IPOs (initial public offerings)

    See We Are Living Through a 'Tech Depression': Marc Andreessen The founder of Netscape and leading high tech entrepreneur Marc Andreesen argues here on CNBC that regulation of public securities markets in the US has become too risk averse and is severely inhibiting public offerings of new technology company shares. This could be an opportunity for the Irish securities industry to specialise in helping small US tech companies do IPOs in the EU with less of a burden of regulation and legal boilerplate. Once those companies became established, they could list on US markets,just as a series of Israeli IPOs have done.

    The Irish corporate tax rate of 12.5% and Dublin's technology hub would be among the attractions of incorporating in Ireland.

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    Politics.ie Member seabhcan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    See We Are Living Through a 'Tech Depression': Marc Andreessen The founder of Netscape and leading high tech entrepreneur Marc Andreesen argues here on CNBC that regulation of public securities markets in the US has become too risk averse and is severely inhibiting public offerings of new technology company shares. This could be an opportunity for the Irish securities industry to specialise in helping small US tech companies do IPOs in the EU with less of a burden of regulation and legal boilerplate. Once those companies became established, they could list on US markets,just as a series of Israeli IPOs have done.

    The Irish corporate tax rate of 12.5% and Dublin's technology hub would be among the attractions of incorporating in Ireland.
    There's more money in London - why do it here?

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    Quote Originally Posted by seabhcan View Post
    There's more money in London - why do it here?
    simple answer = 12.5%

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    See We Are Living Through a 'Tech Depression': Marc Andreessen The founder of Netscape and leading high tech entrepreneur Marc Andreesen argues here on CNBC that regulation of public securities markets in the US has become too risk averse and is severely inhibiting public offerings of new technology company shares. This could be an opportunity for the Irish securities industry to specialise in helping small US tech companies do IPOs in the EU with less of a burden of regulation and legal boilerplate. Once those companies became established, they could list on US markets,just as a series of Israeli IPOs have done.

    The Irish corporate tax rate of 12.5% and Dublin's technology hub would be among the attractions of incorporating in Ireland.
    Yeah, that pesky regulation. A quick look at the past decade shows the damage too much regulation can do.

    Oh no, wait....
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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    Politics.ie Member seabhcan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roll_On View Post
    simple answer = 12.5%
    Corporate tax has nothing do to with IPOs. IPO is about selling shares for the first time, not about corporation profit tax.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roll_On View Post
    simple answer = 12.5%
    12.5% = 2.5%

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    Quote Originally Posted by james5001 View Post
    Yeah, that pesky regulation. A quick look at the past decade shows the damage too much regulation can do.

    Oh no, wait....
    According to an insurance company manager who deals with Irish regulators,they are imposing clueless regulations without proper consultation with the industry and regulations that are very inferior to insurers' own internal controls. Thousands of jobs are threatened by this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seabhcan View Post
    There's more money in London - why do it here?
    Given Dublin's high tech experience,the securities industry in Dublin could develop a specialised niche in tech IPOs. Those IPOs could still be sold to UK investors.

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    Politics.ie Member Suttree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    Given Dublin's high tech experience,the securities industry in Dublin could develop a specialised niche in tech IPOs. Those IPOs could still be sold to UK investors.
    Have many tech IPOs been handled in Dublin by the local financial firms?
    "To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield."

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    You must be joking ?

    Who would provide the professional services, and audit the firms before IPO ?

    the clowns that gave the all clear to the Irish banks, the Quinn Empire, The Dunner empire, etc...

    No. There is a massive integrity deficit in the Dublin professional class and business culture. I suggest that it gets cleaned up first.

    For all our sakes.
    Coveney's ambition is the be Ireland's next EU Commissar and Ireland will pay a price as he builds his CV to position himself sufficiently loyal to the nEU empire.

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