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Thread: Irish medium education - why parents should choose this option.

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    Default Irish medium education - why parents should choose this option.

    A report has stated that Irish medium education is substantially more successful than english medium, to the effect that 14% were more likely to go into further education.
    Fee-paying students more likely to go to college - RTÉ News
    So parents, if you want the best education for your children, consider your local bunscoil.

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    Dylan2010
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    the simple rule, dont send your kids to a school where the kids call their parents Ma & Da

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    Quote Originally Posted by bye bye mubarak View Post
    A report has stated that Irish medium education is substantially more successful than english medium, to the effect that 14% were more likely to go into further education.
    Fee-paying students more likely to go to college - RTÉ News
    So parents, if you want the best education for your children, consider your local bunscoil.
    I don't think it is that straight forward. I would imagine if ET schools were compared to Irish schools the results would be fairly similar. You tend to get parents who are forward planners and thinking about college from the day their kids are born with both those type of schools and what with waiting lists it's the children of forward planners that get into them.

    In addition the Irish medium schools can be a disadvantage for children with learning difficulties. In fact I'm personally aware of three separate children who weren't identified as having quite severe dyslexia and in one case other pronounced difficulties until they considerably older than one would expect such issues to be diagnosed. So there are pluses and minus. Your child that attends an Irish school is likely to be attending with other children who's parents are well motivated towards education and involvement in day to day school activities but a child with difficulties will likely be at a disadvantage and generally these difficulties are not apparent before a child has already settled into a school so moving them can be traumatic.
    Conservatives seem to believe that the rich will work harder if we give them more, and the poor will work harder if we give them less. E.J. Dionne

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    Dylan2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by imokyrok View Post
    I don't think it is that straight forward. I would imagine if ET schools were compared to Irish schools the results would be fairly similar. You tend to get parents who are forward planners and thinking about college from the day their kids are born with both those type of schools and what with waiting lists it's the children of forward planners that get into them.

    In addition the Irish medium schools can be a disadvantage for children with learning difficulties. In fact I'm personally aware of three separate children who weren't identified as having quite severe dyslexia and in one case other pronounced difficulties until they considerably older than one would expect such issues to be diagnosed. So there are pluses and minus. Your child that attends an Irish school is likely to be attending with other children who's parents are well motivated towards education and involvement in day to day school activities but a child with difficulties will likely be at a disadvantage and generally these difficulties are not apparent before a child has already settled into a school so moving them can be traumatic.
    indeed, the real causality is, if parents make the education of their kids a top priority, they will generally go to college. The trick is to find an environment of like minded parents so that the ethos of the other kids isnt undermining your own efforts.

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    I thought this thread was about teaching people to contact the spirit world as Gaeilge. Disappointed now.

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    Politics.ie Member Asparagus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bye bye mubarak View Post
    A report has stated that Irish medium education is substantially more successful than english medium, to the effect that 14% were more likely to go into further education.
    Fee-paying students more likely to go to college - RTÉ News
    So parents, if you want the best education for your children, consider your local bunscoil.
    Wow.
    Now what are the sample sizes?
    because the narrative in the piece is very highlevel
    The data found students in all-Irish schools 14% more likely to be in college one year later.
    i have a feeling that is this a comparison between (97%) Apples and (3%) Oráistí
    in which case 14% is statistically irrelevant.
    ANGER IS A POLICY, GET OFF YOUR KNEES

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    Politics.ie Member seabhcan's Avatar
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    Surely it would make more sense to teach through a useful and used language; spanish/french/german.

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    Politics.ie Member Squib's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seabhcan View Post
    Surely it would make more sense to teach through a useful and used language; spanish/french/german.
    Or why not English? The worlds 2nd most widely spoken language (and most widely spoken 2nd language), the worlds Lingua Franca and the basis of all high level programming languages.

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    Politics.ie Member Prester Jim's Avatar
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    Unfortunately this is 90% a class issue, pure and simple.
    I have yet to find published work on this but from my own observations; the children from the three classes I come across daily: middle class, working class and non-working class (no I don't mean capitalists) behave differently towards education.

    The middle class kids get pressure to work from home and high expectations to succeed.
    The do not all react well or positively to this but the fact remains those forces are there.
    They also have resources at home that may not be in all homes; books, educated adults to help with homework and make sure they are doing it. Parents who are invested in their kids and who have high social capital; know the best local schools, know how to get resources for their kids and in the wealthier cases have access to private schools etc.

    The working class (parents who are or are not employed but want to work) kids have most of the above but often with less money and so are excluded from private education, grinds and sometimes, but not always parents that have all the skills to help their kids with advanced homework, projects etc.
    They will usually have parents who have less social capital but care a great deal about their kids future and will make every effort to help them.
    However, usually but not always, the working class parents will have lower aspirations for their kids as they may have ideas of their own limits and transfer them to their own kids.
    That said, these are generalisations and there are terrible and great parents in both classes who buck the trends.

    The non-working class; parents who have no jobs and who didn't during the boom and may have several generations of unemployed in the house or in the vicinity.
    These kids do not have an interest in work, will resist any effort to get them to work and have virtually no aspirations on leaving school.
    Shocking statement no?
    I have 14 pupils that conform to the above stereotype 100% for their behaviour in school.
    Upon giving a list of these pupils and several others to the school-parent liaison she told me the family situation for all of them, the 14 pupils who fail to perform are all form these non-worker familys, the others I had in the list are kids with varying ability but all are willing to work and have ambitions for their post school years.

    The divisions mentioned between Gaeilge schools, private schools, secondary, community and VEC schools is just masking the division beneath the statistics; class.

    I would go so far as to say your chance of birth dictates most of your chances in life in Ireland, pretty bad stuff for a state so invested in the idea of a republic with equality of opportunity.

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    Politics.ie Member seabhcan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squib View Post

    Or why not English? The worlds 2nd most widely spoken language (and most widely spoken 2nd language), the worlds Lingua Franca and the basis of all high level programming languages.
    We already have English, and thats not going to change soon.

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