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Thread: The Irish: Begrudging Bastards.

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    Default The Irish: Begrudging Bastards.

    “In the US, you look at the guy that lives in the mansion on the hill, and you think, ‘you know, one day, if I work really hard, I could live in that mansion’. In Ireland, people look up at the guy in the mansion on the hill and go, ‘one day, I’m going to get that bastard’.” - Bono.

    Lonely Planet has described begrudgery as Irelands “national sport”. I just wanted to get peoples views on this in our country and whether or not it's warranted. From my experience, I've come across quite a lot of it. I'm the only one I know in my age bracket that owns their own home which I let out from time to time when I'm not in Ireland. I purposefully and intentionally go out of my way to avoid paying taxes at every turn so that I can somehow help provide some dignity to a homeless guy by giving him a job to do.

    I've noticed in, not least the United States, that there is a great work ethic. Something ingrained in the people that hard work and intelligence is to be rewarded, commended, applauded. If you're ambitious, motivated, driven-to-succeed then you're given a pat on the back, supported, encouraged, something to be mirrored. In Ireland, you're a target. You're not supposed to have anything they don't have. At times, I feel that I relate more to Americans than I do to Ireland culturally. A couple of months ago I had the misfortune of witnessing a couple of public school kids jeering a privately educated child as he exited the gates. For the life of me I don't know why but I could obviously sense that they knew he was somehow "different".

    But as my grandmother used to say "Fuck the begrudgers!".

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    ''You have the American dream! The American dream is to be born in the gutter and have nothing. Then to raise up and have all the money in the world, and stick it in your ears and go PLBTLBTLBLTLBTLBLT!! That's a pretty good dream. ''

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R3volution_R3ady View Post
    If you're ambitious, motivated, driven-to-succeed then you're given a pat on the back, supported, encouraged, something to be mirrored. In Ireland, you're a target. You're not supposed to have anything they don't have. At times, I feel that I relate more to Americans than I do to Ireland culturally. A couple of months ago I had the misfortune of witnessing a couple of public school kids jeering a privately educated child as he exited the gates. For the life of me I don't know why but I could obviously sense that they knew he was somehow "different".

    But as my grandmother used to say "Fuck the begrudgers!".

    Not if you're poor. Social mobility is much worse in America. Here, you can nearly do any course or degree you want, as long as you put effort into getting it.
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by R3volution_R3ady View Post
    “In the US, you look at the guy that lives in the mansion on the hill, and you think, ‘you know, one day, if I work really hard, I could live in that mansion’. In Ireland, people look up at the guy in the mansion on the hill and go, ‘one day, I’m going to get that bastard’.” - Bono.

    Lonely Planet has described begrudgery as Irelands “national sport”. I just wanted to get peoples views on this in our country and whether or not it's warranted. From my experience, I've come across quite a lot of it. I'm the only one I know in my age bracket that owns their own home which I let out from time to time when I'm not in Ireland. I purposefully and intentionally go out of my way to avoid paying taxes at every turn so that I can somehow help provide some dignity to a homeless guy by giving him a job to do.

    I've noticed in, not least the United States, that there is a great work ethic. Something ingrained in the people that hard work and intelligence is to be rewarded, commended, applauded. If you're ambitious, motivated, driven-to-succeed then you're given a pat on the back, supported, encouraged, something to be mirrored. In Ireland, you're a target. You're not supposed to have anything they don't have. At times, I feel that I relate more to Americans than I do to Ireland culturally. A couple of months ago I had the misfortune of witnessing a couple of public school kids jeering a privately educated child as he exited the gates. For the life of me I don't know why but I could obviously sense that they knew he was somehow "different".

    But as my grandmother used to say "Fuck the begrudgers!".
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    Politics.ie Member pinemartin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R3volution_R3ady View Post
    A couple of months ago I had the misfortune of witnessing a couple of public school kids jeering a privately educated child as he exited the gates. For the life of me I don't know why but I could obviously sense that they knew he was somehow "different".

    Luke Kelly - Scorn Not His Simplicity - YouTube

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    Politics.ie Member L'Chaim's Avatar
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    Not often I would agree with Bono, but he is dead right in his observation. Begrudgery here is like a cancer. It's nasty and vile. Though on the other hand we have people who get elected, get jobs etc. because of their family name. This is an even worse cancer in Irish life and people will go out and elect someone just because their father, brother, husband etc. died and they are somehow allowed to take over the seat. Now when others object to those people 'inheriting' those positions they wouldn't be begrudgers really. Like me, they would be angry.
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    Politics.ie Member Tin Foil Hat's Avatar
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    They've got it all wrong. Our national sport is self loathing.
    This is how it works. You take a perfectly common human or corporate trait - laziness, over indulgence, jealousy, overcharging - you exaggerate how much the Irish do it, downplay how much everyone else does it, and tell anyone who will listen that Ireland is the worst place in the world.
    Last edited by Tin Foil Hat; 11th April 2013 at 02:21 AM.

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    Politics.ie Member gloria's Avatar
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    I suppose luck and a privileged start has nothing to do with anything?
    I know lots of people who work an awful lot harder than bonio, at harder jobs for longer hours and not much reward.
    Oh, and they don't have the wealth, opportunity or inclination to tax-dodge.
    Regular people like.. the ones that serve you and make your life easy.
    Ahh.. I know.. I'm begrudging you of your fantasy life.

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    Moderator NYCKY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R3volution_R3ady View Post
    “In the US, you look at the guy that lives in the mansion on the hill, and you think, ‘you know, one day, if I work really hard, I could live in that mansion’. In Ireland, people look up at the guy in the mansion on the hill and go, ‘one day, I’m going to get that bastard’.” - Bono.

    Lonely Planet has described begrudgery as Irelands “national sport”. I just wanted to get peoples views on this in our country and whether or not it's warranted. From my experience, I've come across quite a lot of it. I'm the only one I know in my age bracket that owns their own home which I let out from time to time when I'm not in Ireland. I purposefully and intentionally go out of my way to avoid paying taxes at every turn so that I can somehow help provide some dignity to a homeless guy by giving him a job to do.

    I've noticed in, not least the United States, that there is a great work ethic. Something ingrained in the people that hard work and intelligence is to be rewarded, commended, applauded. If you're ambitious, motivated, driven-to-succeed then you're given a pat on the back, supported, encouraged, something to be mirrored. In Ireland, you're a target. You're not supposed to have anything they don't have. At times, I feel that I relate more to Americans than I do to Ireland culturally. A couple of months ago I had the misfortune of witnessing a couple of public school kids jeering a privately educated child as he exited the gates. For the life of me I don't know why but I could obviously sense that they knew he was somehow "different".

    But as my grandmother used to say "Fuck the begrudgers!".

    RR you are spot on. I have said this before on this site that begrudgery is an innate Irish characteristic and is worse than ever with the death of the Celtic tiger.

    Irish people have a tendency to begrudge any bit of success that others have. I've often heard comments like, "I heard he won the Lotto", "ah sure it's easy for him to have a big house like that, he hasn't paid taxes for years", "he/she gets all their staff as trainees from FAS and never pay them" etc.

    Of course the same people will wallow in and gloat over others failures. "He should have minded the first restaurant instead of opening a second one".

    It's rather grim and depressing and in fairness you can read a lot of it on this site too.

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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    I think people are mixing up begrudgery with Christian values, such as as living simple, meaningful lives.
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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