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Thread: 'Integrated' Education, One Skol Multi Denominational...

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    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
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    Default 'Integrated' Education, One Skol Multi Denominational...

    Two County Tyrone primary schools have been told there are no legal barriers to them merging.

    The schools, one Catholic and one Protestant, would use the same front door but go to their own separate wings.
    BBC News - No barrier over Catholic and Protestant schools merger

    Personally i would prefer fully integrated non faith education with religious studies either optional or left to the parents, but it is an interesting idea and certainly an improvement on attending schools miles apart...
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

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    Castle Ray
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    Quote Originally Posted by between the bridges View Post
    BBC News - No barrier over Catholic and Protestant schools merger

    Personally i would prefer fully integrated non faith education with religious studies either optional or left to the parents, but it is an interesting idea and certainly an improvement on attending schools miles apart...
    Segregation will never be more visible than that. Do the kids sit on different sides or front / back of the bus too?

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    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Castle Ray View Post
    Segregation will never be more visible than that. Do the kids sit on different sides or front / back of the bus too?
    Didn't say it was perfect, but a step in the right direction at least the kids would be mixing at break etc rather than being totally separate as is the norm now...
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

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    Politics.ie Member Tommythesash's Avatar
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    Integrated education is available in Ireland to anyone who wants it. This is not a new phenomena. What's glaringly obvious is that most parents aren't interested.


    Protestants in particular need to focus on their kids getting a decent education, not who they share a classroom with.
    I'm Ulster 'til I die.

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    Politics.ie Member belfast1981's Avatar
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    Don't care if my (future) children get educated in a Protestant only, Catholic only or Intergrated school. My first and foremost choice would be the school that could offer them the best education they can get. Regardless of their denomination majority they will be educated alongside..

    All schools be it catholic, protestant or Integrated are meant to teach the same things from the same syllabus anyway. But what people should be looking at is 'where will my child get the best possible education' and not 'are the others in his class the same religious denomination'

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    Politics.ie Member Tommythesash's Avatar
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    My kids go to an interdenominational school here in America. I'm not too thrilled about it but at least where I live they all look alike.
    I'm Ulster 'til I die.

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    Politics.ie Member Just Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Castle Ray View Post
    Segregation will never be more visible than that. Do the kids sit on different sides or front / back of the bus too?
    No doubt you'll want the Catholics to sit at the back.

    Those days are over I'm afraid.

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    Politics.ie Member rmn640's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by belfast1981 View Post
    Don't care if my (future) children get educated in a Protestant only, Catholic only or Intergrated school. My first and foremost choice would be the school that could offer them the best education they can get. Regardless of their denomination majority they will be educated alongside..
    +1

    I'd only send any children I have to an integrated school if it out performs it's single denominational equivalent.
    Happy clappy, feel good integration comes second to quality of education.

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    Politics.ie Member physicist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by between the bridges View Post
    BBC News - No barrier over Catholic and Protestant schools merger

    Personally i would prefer fully integrated non faith education with religious studies either optional or left to the parents, but it is an interesting idea and certainly an improvement on attending schools miles apart...
    Well meeting new strange people always requires a degree of faith, these are not computer game characters but real people and as I've said before going to the school playground for the first time, is unnatural and is difficult for any child. Say what you want about religion but there needs to be some awareness forgiveness, tolerance, patience, and courage ingrained within the ethos a child, since there is no certainty in how anyone else but yourself can respond in a given circumstance, persisting through with that uncertainty without an easily justifiable and rational fear of the unknown requires a faith.

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    I don't see how this is much better than having the two schools in separate buildings. If anything, it will only highlight the differences between the two communities even more. Personally, I think that fully integrated education in the North will be a long term goal, and cannot be achieved in isolation with the other areas which keep the two communities apart, like sports, public housing and the policies relating to the Irish language. The Unionist community in general will have to get more comfortable with the Irish language(or at least be more tolerant towards the language and it's significance to many in the Nationalist community), and the distrust that is held towards Gaelic games has to be tackled.

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