Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 59

Thread: Hungary's draconian new laws

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Strypetown
    Posts
    6,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Hungary's draconian new laws

    The government of Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban is being assailed from all sides in the international arena for a raft of new laws that critics say infringe on basic human rights. The articles below contain details of more of these (many of which are indeed objectionable) but there are two in particular that caught my eye.

    1. Sleeping in the streets will henceforth be a crime.
    Is this such a bad thing? Obviously, if there are no hostel beds available, then the law is stupid. But there are people sleeping rough in major Irish cities because they don't want to go into a hostel. It's dangerous and unhealthy for them and unsightly in an urban environment, not to mention giving a menacing air to an area.

    2. University students receiving grants are required to work in Hungary after graduating.
    This would be for a certain period of time. I think this should be seen as an opportunity to pay back one's country for the benefit of the education. There's no point in educating tens of thousands of students only for them to go and benefit some other economy. Such jobs might need to be in the public sector and the wages might be pretty low (perhaps not much above dole) but there's no such thing as a free lunch any more.

    Sources:
    1. UN rights office joins condemnation of Hungary reforms - European News | Latest News from Across Europe | The Irish Times - Sat, Mar 16, 2013
    2. Critics slam Hungary for 'anti-democratic' new laws - Public Service Europe
    3. BBC News - Q&A: Hungary's controversial constitutional changes
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

  2. #2
    Dylan2010
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shqiptar View Post
    2. University students receiving grants are required to work in Hungary after graduating.
    This would be for a certain period of time. I think this should be seen as an opportunity to pay back one's country for the benefit of the education. There's no point in educating tens of thousands of students only for them to go and benefit some other economy. Such jobs might need to be in the public sector and the wages might be pretty low (perhaps not much above dole) but there's no such thing as a free lunch any more.
    its a silly attempt to make the welfare state work. Fair enough if a company pays for your education as part of a apprenticeship and you agree to work for them afterwards, everyone knows what they are letting themselves in for. Does this mean however that an Engineer would have to take a job in McDonalds or some dumb makey uppy job like filling potholes?

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Strypetown
    Posts
    6,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    its a silly attempt to make the welfare state work. Fair enough if a company pays for your education as part of a apprenticeship and you agree to work for them afterwards, everyone knows what they are letting themselves in for. Does this mean however that an Engineer would have to take a job in McDonalds or some dumb makey uppy job like filling potholes?
    Well, one would hope not. It should be a job that's relevant to their discipline. Otherwise, their future career prospects would be damaged.
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member Telemachus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    A Dirac Sea
    Posts
    6,570
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    The UN should shut its stupid face.
    ..the Irish nation can become other than white, by privileging the voices of the racialised and subverting state immigration but also integration policies. – Ronit Lentin

  5. #5
    Dylan2010
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shqiptar View Post
    Well, one would hope not. It should be a job that's relevant to their discipline. Otherwise, their future career prospects would be damaged.
    but thats the thing, jobs dont just open up because a politician says they should. Some wonk will be responsible for making this appear to work and suddenly Litter Warden will be re badged as sanitary engineering internship. Hungarian graduates working abroad will be picking up language skills and a lot will want to return various reasons. If the Hungarian Education system has as many dumb courses as the Irish one, they should cut back if they cant afford it.

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member LamportsEdge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    21,912
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Landlocked Hungary is becoming a small island
    Whenever understanding exists, accepting or rejecting is unnecessary. (Fundamentals of a Gnostic Education).

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Nemesiscorporation's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Planet earth
    Posts
    14,081
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shqiptar View Post
    The government of Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban is being assailed from all sides in the international arena for a raft of new laws that critics say infringe on basic human rights. The articles below contain details of more of these (many of which are indeed objectionable) but there are two in particular that caught my eye.

    1. Sleeping in the streets will henceforth be a crime.
    Is this such a bad thing? Obviously, if there are no hostel beds available, then the law is stupid. But there are people sleeping rough in major Irish cities because they don't want to go into a hostel. It's dangerous and unhealthy for them and unsightly in an urban environment, not to mention giving a menacing air to an area.

    2. University students receiving grants are required to work in Hungary after graduating.
    This would be for a certain period of time. I think this should be seen as an opportunity to pay back one's country for the benefit of the education. There's no point in educating tens of thousands of students only for them to go and benefit some other economy. Such jobs might need to be in the public sector and the wages might be pretty low (perhaps not much above dole) but there's no such thing as a free lunch any more.

    Sources:
    1. UN rights office joins condemnation of Hungary reforms - European News | Latest News from Across Europe | The Irish Times - Sat, Mar 16, 2013
    2. Critics slam Hungary for 'anti-democratic' new laws - Public Service Europe
    3. BBC News - Q&A: Hungary's controversial constitutional changes
    Leaving aside the fact that Hungary seems determined to move back to 1942, forcing medical students in Ireland to work for ten years after graduation so as to cover the costs of training them, might not be a bad idea.

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Strypetown
    Posts
    6,308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    but thats the thing, jobs dont just open up because a politician says they should. Some wonk will be responsible for making this appear to work and suddenly Litter Warden will be re badged as sanitary engineering internship. Hungarian graduates working abroad will be picking up language skills and a lot will want to return various reasons. If the Hungarian Education system has as many dumb courses as the Irish one, they should cut back if they cant afford it.
    I don't know how it would work in the Irish context for those who didn't get jobs in the private sector. It would require a change in mindset by public sector workers whereby the drawbridge isn't pulled up to keep out new young recruits.
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member Partizan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    7,825
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nemesiscorporation View Post
    Leaving aside the fact that Hungary seems determined to move back to 1942, forcing medical students in Ireland to work for ten years after graduation so as to cover the costs of training them, might not be a bad idea.
    Many countries already have this stipulation, Russia being one. International students (Irish included) studying in Russia are required to live and work there for a period of time, usually 3-5 years after graduation.

  10. #10
    Dylan2010
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nemesiscorporation View Post
    Leaving aside the fact that Hungary seems determined to move back to 1942, forcing medical students in Ireland to work for ten years after graduation so as to cover the costs of training them, might not be a bad idea.
    always wanting to paper over a crack. Why not close some of the dumber colleges around Ireland and open more places in degrees that are important.

Page 1 of 6 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •