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Thread: On this day : 24th March 1603

  1. #1

    Default On this day : 24th March 1603

    James VI and I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    On this day 410 years ago James VI of Scotland, also assumed the role of monarch of England and Ireland, thus becoming the first person to rule the entire British isles. Dismissed as something of an intellectual lightweight at the time, he saw off the Gunpowder Plot and is not considered to be one of the better monarchs.
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  2. #2

    Default Bring it on, Keith-M!

    Dismissed as something of an intellectual lightweight at the time ...

    Now, there's a statement crying out for justification.

    One would need to account for the natural reticence and self-protecting suspicions of James Stewart (the Stuart thing was a French-acquired affectation of his mother).

    Consider his infancy:
    • born three months after the Riccio murder;
    • with his dissolute and inane father, Darnley (who refused to attend the child's baptism, although present in the same building), dismissed by his mother, then murdered at Kirk o' Field;
    • his mother effectively on-the-run from Stirling to Holyrood to escape her father-in-law, Lennox;
    • his mother's disaster of a remarriage to Hepburn, her surrender to the confederate lords, her miscarriage, and abdication, and his succession;

    — all that before he was thirteen months old.

    Then the regency of his minority:
    • his mother, wafting in the background for another couple of decades, a constant focus for plot and counterplot;
    • two of his regents (Moray and Lennox) dying violently;
    • a low-key civil war running through the early 1570s;
    • his tutor, George Buchanan, may have been one of the great humanist intellects, but was also an advanced sadist who believe that sagacity came via savage whippings— and, to the end of his own life, James admitted to nightmares about Buchanan,
    • all a time when the likes of Melville were rejecting all forms of royal or episcopal authority, and militant prebyterianism was on the advance.


    When, at the age of not quite twelve, he announced his capacity to rule (1579), he was:
    • determined, decisive and unpredictable — that, and more, is evident in his rejection of Elizabeth I's support for Morton (1578);
    • very well educated— he inherited a substantial library from his mother, to which his tutors (Buchanan apart) contributed, and for which he himself purchased (sporting and romantic works included) — they gar me speik Latin ar I could speak Scotis — so, if anything, he was exceptional among contemporary monarchs for his learning.

    English ambassadors, Henry Carey, Lord Hunsdon, and Thomas Randolph, repeatedly reported back to Elizabeth, commending James's judgement, his utterances — and his ability to dissimulate wherein he is in his tender years more practised than others forty years older than he.
    Last edited by Malcolm Redfellow; 24th March 2013 at 05:32 PM. Reason: Punctuation

  3. #3

    Default

    On this day 410 years ago James VI of Scotland, also assumed the role of monarch of England and Ireland, thus becoming the first person to rule the entire British isles. Dismissed as something of an intellectual lightweight at the time, he saw off the Gunpowder Plot and is not considered to be one of the better monarchs.
    He also oversaw the Plantation of Ulster and the Flight of the Earls, thus consigning Ulster to its fate of a bitter ethno-religious conflict that has persisted ever since in that part of Ireland and he also instigated the harsh anti-Catholic policies that were the begginings of the penal laws, and his successors would follow up on these thus ensuring a more fervent hatred between the two communities so yeah, from an Irish perspective a pretty god awful Stuart monarch and the first of many god awful Stuart monarchs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith-M View Post
    James VI and I - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    and is not considered to be one of the better monarchs.
    From whose perspective?
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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    I remember it well.
    The world is a very puzzling place. If you're not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else's mind.

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    Politics.ie Member eoghanacht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kev408 View Post
    From whose perspective?
    Anglo-Irish CoI, Magaret Thatcher, Glasgow Rangers fans like Keith.

    I too am curious to know how Keith reached that conclusion.
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  7. #7

    Default An Fear Réabhlóideach @ 10:30 pm

    Yes, that's the orthodox take; but I'd be wary of imposing what amounts to 20th-century propaganda on 16th-17th century history.

    Scottish settlements in Ulster predate the Plantation: Irish chieftains had long recruited Scottish mercenary "gallowglasses". While many returned to Scotland, the MacDonnells didn't, occupying parts of modern Antrim. That was why, as early as 1556, the Irish parliament attempted to outlaw all Scots in Ireland.

    Thanks to the warfare and depredations of the late-1500s, by the start of the 17th century, particularly with the flight of Tyrone and Tyrconnell, large parts of Ulster were underpopulated — and effectively ungoverned. If the intent was simply to supplant native Irish with imported protestants, it singularly failed. By the time of James VI & I's death, the Plantation amounted to 6,402 "British" male settlers (roughly 50-50 English and Scottish) in Ulster — and they concentrated in the newly-established towns [source: Nicholas Canny, Making Ireland British, 1560-1650]. Nor were the Scottish settlers confined to Ulster: they turn up in Sligo, Galway, Cork, Mayo and Wexford. Oddly these settlements don't receive the publicity nowadays afforded Ulster.

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    Politics.ie Member Catalpast's Avatar
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    James was a queer fish alright

    While he did Ireland no favours he was a reasonably good King of the British Isle

    IIRC he kept England out of War for all of his Reign

    He also ensured the Succession

    - though that was not a success...
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    Politics.ie Member james5001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpast View Post
    James was a queer fish alright
    I beg your pardon.
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    Politics.ie Member picador's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keith M
    Dismissed as something of an intellectual lightweight
    Where did he stand on the Celtic v Rangers issue, Keith?
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