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Thread: How do Unionists feel about Irishness in general?

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    Default How do Unionists feel about Irishness in general?

    Well, St. Patrick's day is over now. I hope that all enjoyed it.

    For some reason, I feel that this is a good time to ask - how do Unionists in general seem to reject all forms of Irishness, when they live on the same island as the "Natives"? Using the term "British Isles" to counter that doesn't work - it is common practise to name Island chains after the biggest geographical island in the chain, and that island is called "Britain", which is a different island. That's that island, this is this one.

    Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattarigna View Post
    Well, St. Patrick's day is over now. I hope that all enjoyed it.

    For some reason, I feel that this is a good time to ask - how do Unionists in general seem to reject all forms of Irishness, when they live on the same island as the "Natives"? Using the term "British Isles" to counter that doesn't work - it is common practise to name Island chains after the biggest geographical island in the chain, and that island is called "Britain", which is a different island. That's that island, this is this one.

    Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
    Most ignore it as word Irish pops up too frequently, just like the colour green. Some are attempting to hijack him as the first Protestant to arrive on this island and that they are in fact, his natural descendants. Others, in attempting to find an "orange" definition for St. Patrick and his legacy, have tied themselves in knots that a definition of the the saint and his day has become impossible because the mental gymnastics required has become so convoluted that they can't unravel themselves. All this is just in NI. They simply cannot think of the meaning of St. Patrick and the day in the Rep - that is way too much to think about, so they don't go there.

    All-in-all, it's great craic to watch.
    If we got rid of all the papists, there'd be no trouble whatsoever. The place will be nirvana. Schomberg.

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    Politics.ie Member tokkie's Avatar
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    Who cares? If they want to be Irish let them. If they don't, then let them be too. Life is too short to be dealing with these people and their wide array of peculiarities.

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    Politics.ie Member euryalus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattarigna View Post
    Also, what would Unionists make of St. Patrick's day? Just wondering.
    I don't know what Ulster Unionists think about St Patrick, but in other parts of the United Kingdom he is regarded as one of the four "home" saints, and celebrated accordingly - indeed, as he was British (unlike St George), he seems to be particularly revered, especially within the Anglican church, which has always been mildly nationalistic in such matters.
    "Cast a cold eye ......."

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    Politics.ie Member Global Justice's Avatar
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    How do Zionists feel about the West Bank and Gaza?

    I had a good Paddy's day. No religious extremism or bigotry. Proper day of culture and inclusiveness. Suffering still, but worth it petunia

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    Quote Originally Posted by euryalus View Post
    I don't know what Ulster Unionists think about St Patrick, but in other parts of the United Kingdom he is regarded as one of the four "home" saints, and celebrated accordingly - indeed, as he was British (unlike St George), he seems to be particularly revered, especially within the Anglican church, which has always been mildly nationalistic in such matters.
    How would that work when most of Ireland isn't in the UK?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tokkie View Post
    Who cares? If they want to be Irish let them. If they don't, then let them be too. Life is too short to be dealing with these people and their wide array of peculiarities.
    Well, it will be an interesting life, at least.

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    Politics.ie Member euryalus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattarigna View Post
    How would that work when most of Ireland isn't in the UK?
    I don't understand the question. St Patrick is more popular in England than St George, that's all I am saying. My very first school history lesson, in a Church of England school, was about St Patrick.
    "Cast a cold eye ......."

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    Quote Originally Posted by euryalus View Post
    I don't understand the question. St Patrick is more popular in England than St George, that's all I am saying. My very first school history lesson, in a Church of England school, was about St Patrick.
    I suppose I find it strange that the patron saint of a different country is more popular in England than their own patron saint.

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    Politics.ie Member euryalus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mattarigna View Post
    I suppose I find it strange that the patron saint of a different country is more popular in England than their own patron saint.
    Yes, but to a Unionist, St Patrick is not "the saint of a different country", he is one of four national saints who are associated with a single country known as "The United Kingdom".
    "Cast a cold eye ......."

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