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Thread: Impact of subsea Earthquake in Bay of Biscay and Tsunami

  1. #1

    Default Impact of subsea Earthquake in Bay of Biscay and Tsunami

    Landslide causes tsunamis off the coast of Cornwall - Telegraph

    Ireland has had a number of Tsunami's over the years but no surviving lasting records of damage.

    A small Tsunami off Cornwall was recorded 2 years ago but damage was little and was caused by a land slip at sea.

    Bearing in mind the population that live close to the coast of Ireland on low lying areas has a study been done of the potential damage that could be caused by an undersea slip or quake in Bay of Biscay or off Portugal.

    As Irish Sea will effectively channel a Tsunami both speeding it up and raising its height then clearly East Coast would not get off lightly nor would the South Coast.

    Has there been any academic studies on a potential impact zone or warning systems ?

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member Dame_Enda's Avatar
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    The Cliffs of Moher would be a formidable obstacle to a tsunami, but there was a very destructive one in the early 1700s that I think killed hundreds in West Munster.

    In 1755 Lisbon was destroyed both by an earthquake and a tsunami. that happened at the same time. 40,000 died and 80% of the city was destroyed. I think (though I am unsure) that the Irish tsunami may have been linked.

    The greatest danger in terms of a plausible cause of a future Atlantic tsunami is the island of La Palma and other volcanic islands. If it erupts part of the island could fall into the sea, triggering one.

    Below is a map of historical Atlantic tsunamis and levels of destruction.

    Fair and Balanced

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dame_Enda View Post
    The Cliffs of Moher would be a formidable obstacle to a tsunami, but there was a very destructive one in the early 1700s that I think killed hundreds in West Munster.

    In 1755 Lisbon was destroyed both by an earthquake and a tsunami. that happened at the same time. 40,000 died and 80% of the city was destroyed. I think (though I am unsure) that the Irish tsunami may have been linked.
    There have been a number but currently there is no study on potential impact as feeling could be very significant.

  4. #4

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    Bumping this because as can be seen from the combination of weather and tidal surges the flood defences are not really up to much.

    Clearly a subsea quake as envisaged in Bay of Biscay or along Portugeese coast would find both UK and Ireland coastal areas swamped very quickly with little or no protection in place.

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    Politics.ie Member cabledude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by odie1kanobe View Post
    Bumping this because as can be seen from the combination of weather and tidal surges the flood defences are not really up to much.

    Clearly a subsea quake as envisaged in Bay of Biscay or along Portugeese coast would find both UK and Ireland coastal areas swamped very quickly with little or no protection in place.
    As a resident of the east coast, this worries me greatly.






    Last edited by cabledude; 4th January 2014 at 12:40 AM.
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    Politics.ie Member johnny365's Avatar
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    The theory that part of the la Palma island could fall into the sea at once causing a mega tsunami was argued against in a recent documentary, geologists and scientists done a study and said there was little evidence that this break would happen all at once and cause a mega tsunami.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny365 View Post
    The theory that part of the la Palma island could fall into the sea at once causing a mega tsunami was argued against in a recent documentary, geologists and scientists done a study and said there was little evidence that this break would happen all at once and cause a mega tsunami.
    1755 Lisbon Earthquake cause a Tsunami that impacted Ireland

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    Politics.ie Member johnny365's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by odie1kanobe View Post
    1755 Lisbon Earthquake cause a Tsunami that impacted Ireland
    Yes i know that they werent arguing that a tsunami wouldnt cause massive damage to Ireland the Uk and other parts of Europe. They were making the point that even if their was a massive earthquake that the island was unlikely to break off like is suggested and cause a mega tsunami. They suggested that it would gradually break into the sea. They all agreed that a major earthquake off Portugal could have dire consequences but they were exploring the specific la Palma theory.

  9. #9

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    Experts warn of potential tsunami risks for Ireland - Independent.ie

    Given the events and tides of recent weeks think 10 times the volume of water, its not the height of a Tsunami that causes the problems but the sheer volume of water.

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    Politics.ie Member stopdoingstuff's Avatar
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