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Thread: Should there be a moratorium on acceptance of applications for third-level nursing courses?

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    Default Should there be a moratorium on acceptance of applications for third-level nursing courses?

    The public sector recruitment moratorium means that newly-qualified nurses cannot find permanent employment, thus causing most of them to emigrate, even though their training has been funded by the taxpayer.

    Given that it will be impossible to have a stable career in nursing in Ireland for the foreseeable future, it might make sense for third-level colleges to suspend acceptance of further applications for nursing courses until the recruitment moratorium is lifted, just like the lack of further Garda recruitment means that Templemore is not being used frequently at present.

    After all, what's the point in pursuing a career in nursing if one cannot find a stable career in it in Ireland?

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    Politics.ie Member firefly123's Avatar
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    There are private nurses. There are no private Garda.
    Life is hard
    That's why no-one survives

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    Politics.ie Member Asparagus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firefly123 View Post
    There are private nurses. There are no private Garda.
    If there were, would they hook up in Private Copperface Jacks?
    ANGER IS A POLICY, GET OFF YOUR KNEES

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    Quote Originally Posted by firefly123 View Post
    There are private nurses. There are no private Garda.
    Public-sector nurses are the only nurses who have job security. The moratorium means that there is no job security for newly-qualified nurses in Ireland. I made the comparison between nursing and policing in public-sector terms. I didn't compare policing to private security.

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    A good point.Reilly put the finishing touch to nursing in this country when he told them
    to take the yellow pack cut price jobs or go and prop up the counter of a fast food outlet.

    However, he is not the first minister to encourage the youth to leave this country,
    No future here.

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    So if you want to train as a nurse you'd have to go abroad?

    I'd rather we kept training nurses and gradually replaced the older less qualified/formally educated generation.

    I know it's a feckless comment but we shouldn't be giving up on our young people.

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    How many young 'wans' are doing beautician courses or hair dressing courses in the lower degree colleges? Bit of an epidemic by all accounts.
    Boycott the "Irish" Sun rag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by davidcameron View Post
    The public sector recruitment moratorium means that newly-qualified nurses cannot find permanent employment, thus causing most of them to emigrate, even though their training has been funded by the taxpayer.

    Given that it will be impossible to have a stable career in nursing in Ireland for the foreseeable future, it might make sense for third-level colleges to suspend acceptance of further applications for nursing courses until the recruitment moratorium is lifted, just like the lack of further Garda recruitment means that Templemore is not being used frequently at present.

    After all, what's the point in pursuing a career in nursing if one cannot find a stable career in it in Ireland?
    Apart from being seriously short sighted, this is a strange idea. People choose an area of study for their own benefit first and foremost, and for their own ends be that working in Ireland, overseas or not at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ManUnited View Post
    Apart from being seriously short sighted, this is a strange idea. People choose an area of study for their own benefit first and foremost, and for their own ends be that working in Ireland, overseas or not at all.
    Young Irish people who are determined to become cops have to emigrate because of the recruitment moratorium. Why should it be different for those who want to become nurses?

    At least with teaching there is still a chance of getting employment in Ireland because no other public-sector profession has ratios between the number of public-sector workers and the number of people they have to care for, i.e. pupil-teacher ratio.

    In a positive step, there is provision for a panel system for fixed-term teachers at second level, which will give a degree of career certainty and job security. Such teachers will be prioritised for appointment to permanent positions when they become available. A similar system already operates well at primary level.
    See more at: http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/....JOwj4pnS.dpuf

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    Politics.ie Member Inda Kenny's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=davidcameron;6477168]Young Irish people who are determined to become cops have to emigrate because of the recruitment moratorium. Why should it be different for those who want to become nurses?

    At least with teaching there is still a chance of getting employment in Ireland because no other public-sector profession has ratios between the number of public-sector workers and the number of people they have to care for, i.e. pupil-teacher ratio.

    Not at the moment there isn't. Many of the primary and secondary teachers are in the Middle East because of lack of work here. Last week on Linkedin saw an ad looking for 75 teacher in UAE. Also many schools are offering 0 hours contracts according to the TUI union guy on the radio this morning. According to one of the recruiting agency there are too many teachers because when the recession hit people piled into teaching.

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