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Thread: Anti-depressant and sedative use - north and south

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    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
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    Default Anti-depressant and sedative use - north and south

    In a recent article in the Irish Medical Times dealing with the effect of recession and unemployment on suicide levels, the following startling statistics emerge.

    However, the number of adults [in the Republic of Ireland] who have used sedatives and tranquillisers over the previous year has risen by 1.8 per cent since 2006/07, but rates of antidepressant use have remained steady.

    Both of these statistics are still significantly below usage figures in Northern Ireland, where antidepressant and sedative use is almost three times and double that in the Republic.
    Why is usage so much higher a few kilometres up the road? It can't be the weather or lack of sunlight. Is it a lingering after-effect of the violence that rocked Northern Ireland from the 1960s to the late 1990s? Or is the UK NHS being a little too laissez-faire, chucking happy pills across the counter at all and sundry?

    All in all, it seems that so far, despite a sharp rise in unemployment in the Republic, there has only been a small rise in suicides (compare with Greece where the rise has been 60%) although the authors do note that there often is a delayed impact that has effects years after the economic crisis takes hold.

    Source:

    1. Recession ‘adding urgency’ to suicide prevention need

    (Answer "yes" to the medical professional question or you won't get to see the article.)
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

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    Obviously a North South bi-polar problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by irelandmearsedotcom View Post
    Obviously a North South bi-polar problem.
    Or else the effects of listening to Martin McGuinness drone away for hours and hours every week.

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    Politics.ie Member sondagefaux's Avatar
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    The percentage of people in NI who've had family/friends killed or injured, themselves been injured or who've witnessed serious violence would be much higher than in the republic.

    In 2010 it was estimated that 107,000 people in Northern Ireland suffered some physical injury as a result of the conflict. On the basis of data gathered by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency, the Victims Commission estimated that the conflict resulted in 500,000 'victims' in Northern Ireland alone. It defines 'victims' are those who are directly affected by 'bereavement', 'physical injury' or 'trauma' as a result of the conflict.[133]
    (Cunningham, Simon. "Troubles created 500 000 victims says official body". The Irish News, 27 September 2011.)

    The Troubles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    That's a huge percentage of NI's total population of 1.811 million.

    If you deduct those born or moved to NI (eg. Eastern European immigrants) after the violence had largely ended, you'd get about 1.5 million people who were around during the worst of the violence.

    If the Victims Commission estimate is accurate, one in three of those people were directly affected in some way.

    Add the NHS to that, and it's not surprising that antidepressant and sedatives are prescribed much more frequently.
    Mark Murray.

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    In response to the OP, I think social spending has historically been very high in NI. The London government just kept throwing money at the problem in the hope that sooner or later, things would calm down.

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    There is a higher rate of social welfare dependency in the north. There is a ridiculous amount of people on Disability for example. It is also easier to get free prescription drugs and if something is free lots of people will use it to get whacked out of their heads. Most of the creatures around O'Connell Street are apparently on prescription stuff which has become a burgeoning market.
    Last edited by Seanie Lemass; 24th February 2013 at 01:53 PM.

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    Gosh, I wonder where they get it? Is that another cross border trade we've missed?

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    14,300 people in Derry /Londonderry are disabled ie on DLA (Disability Living Allowance or Derry Living Allowance or Derry London Allowance depending on your sense of humor). This in a city with a population of about 90000. Could quite possibly be the largest disabled community in the world hi!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shqiptar View Post
    Why is usage so much higher a few kilometres up the road? It can't be the weather or lack of sunlight. Is it a lingering after-effect of the violence that rocked Northern Ireland from the 1960s to the late 1990s? Or is the UK NHS being a little too laissez-faire, chucking happy pills across the counter at all and sundry?
    Could be the availability of the NHS itself, with free doctor visits, and cheap prescriptions. Or do they now have free prescriptions in NI as well?
    At some point the gloves must come off and we face our adversaries.
    We're all Rhodesians now.

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    Politics.ie Member Shqiptar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eyelight View Post
    Could be the availability of the NHS itself, with free doctor visits, and cheap prescriptions. Or do they now have free prescriptions in NI as well?
    I had to Google this. There are no prescription charges in NI. They were abolished in April 2010 but there are some mutterings that they might be returning.

    BBC News - Edwin Poots considers prescription charges move
    Eagla agus eaglais: an bhfuil an fhréamh teangeolaíochta céanna acu?

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