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Thread: Reform in teaching of Irish per Diarmuid MacAneaspag.

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    Default Reform in teaching of Irish per Diarmuid MacAneaspag.

    Des Bishop (of all people) raised an important point on the teaching of the Irish language on the Late Late Show on Friday. He was able to reach the same proficiency in Irish as 14 to 16 year olds in "irish college", in 4 months.

    He proposed two levels:
    A) Spoken, comprehension of oral and written irish.
    B) The poems, stories, essays for the higher level students (or swats as he called them).

    Would the Irish language be better served if the written exams were not mandatory, but all students had to undergo just the oral and aural exams?

    (Could those who propose the abolition of irish as a national/notional language and other anti-Irish rants take it to the thread on that campaign? Go raibh maith agaibh).
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    Default Re: Reform in teaching of Irish per Diarmuid MacAneaspag.

    Quote Originally Posted by returning officer
    Des Bishop (of all people) raised an important point on the teaching of the Irish language on the Late Late Show on Friday. He was able to reach the same proficiency in Irish as 14 to 16 year olds in "irish college", in 4 months.

    He proposed two levels:
    A) Spoken, comprehension of oral and written irish.
    B) The poems, stories, essays for the higher level students (or swats as he called them).

    Would the Irish language be better served if the written exams were not mandatory, but all students had to undergo just the oral and aural exams?

    (Could those who propose the abolition of irish as a national/notional language and other anti-Irish rants take it to the thread on that campaign? Go raibh maith agaibh).
    Good old Des Bishop! Did he address his balloney as gaeilge and if so (whioch I doubt) did yez all understand. He learns what he learns to make money. His comedy is poor and he does it in deprived areas for impact. Now maybe Hanafin would give him a job... :P

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    It is quiet clear that school teaching of Irish is just not working, students are leaving school without a basic understanding of the language. Perhaps the Welsh system may be a good example eo follow there certainly seems to be more of an appreciation of their language over there

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    Well I can't remember ever once having an conversation in Irish in my whole life - it was all about just learning things off by heart to pass an exam. I pity the poor person who does the aural - it must be weird speaking to young adults as if they were 4 year olds.

    Israel has managed to make Hebrew a spoken language - as opposed to a language were people just learnt bits off by heart for religious stuff like some peoplel earnt bits of Latin but can't actually speak Latin - as well as English in under 50 years so if Israel can have a dual language why can't we?

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    im more concerned about the kids leaving scholl that cant read, write or do maths
    Knowledge is power.

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    It's similar to something I'd be in favour of.

    Firstly, a separation of Irish teaching into Irish for native Irish speakers (or gaelscoilites) and Irish for English speakers. It is ridiculous to hold two different groups to the same standard.

    The Irish for Irish speakers course will be similar to the English course wherein literature, mechanics, essay-writing, vocabulary expanision, debating, should be dealt with within the language.


    Secondly, for teaching Irish as a 'foreign' language TIFL, we should transfer emphasis from literature to language acquisition at all levels. Literature will be consulted of course to provide examples of the language in use, but literary criticism will not be expected. Further to this, and more importantly, more emphasis should be placed on the communicative competence at oral and aural levels, and writing ability should be of secondary importance but still a part of the course. Is beatha teanga í a labhairt, as they say.

    Thirdly a new separate optional course should appear at junior and senior cycles called Litríocht na Gaeilge. This would be a course designed to expose students, with reasonably good Irish from the main course or primary school, analysing literature, be they short-films, drama, poetry, short-stories novellas, and in the senior cycle novellas. It should be designed that anyone who does well on the main course, should be able to do exceptionally well in this course, providing an added incentive to individuals who are good at the language. It should deal with mostly modern authors, ní dhomhnaill ó searcaigh de paor, ní ghráda, ó conghaile, titley, and the most exceptional of traditional ones (ó conaire, mac grianna, perhaps even pearse ó díreáin, ó ríordáin). No autobiographies!!!!!!!
    "Only by applying the most rigorous standards do we pay writing in Irish the supreme compliment of taking it seriously." - Breandán Ó Doibhlín.

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    Deasmhumhan (or Deasún), not Diarmuid.
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    returning officer,

    Definitely.

    Riadach,

    Good thinking.

    I suspect however that they will never change anything as the current methods of teaching Irish (many many people do actualy manage to learn but) are designed by elements in the Roinn Éadóchais to fail.
    Caithfear a bheith ag gníomhiú ho háitiúil!

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    Speaking it should be the priority not writing. After all in the oral didn't we all only learn to speak only what we could get away with. Looking back I wish I had done more towards learning Irish.
    “Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies.” - Thomas Jefferson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riadach
    It's similar to something I'd be in favour of.

    Firstly, a separation of Irish teaching into Irish for native Irish speakers (or gaelscoilites) and Irish for English speakers. It is ridiculous to hold two different groups to the same standard.

    The Irish for Irish speakers course will be similar to the English course wherein literature, mechanics, essay-writing, vocabulary expanision, debating, should be dealt with within the language.


    Secondly, for teaching Irish as a 'foreign' language TIFL, we should transfer emphasis from literature to language acquisition at all levels. Literature will be consulted of course to provide examples of the language in use, but literary criticism will not be expected. Further to this, and more importantly, more emphasis should be placed on the communicative competence at oral and aural levels, and writing ability should be of secondary importance but still a part of the course. Is beatha teanga í a labhairt, as they say.

    Thirdly a new separate optional course should appear at junior and senior cycles called Litríocht na Gaeilge. This would be a course designed to expose students, with reasonably good Irish from the main course or primary school, analysing literature, be they short-films, drama, poetry, short-stories novellas, and in the senior cycle novellas. It should be designed that anyone who does well on the main course, should be able to do exceptionally well in this course, providing an added incentive to individuals who are good at the language. It should deal with mostly modern authors, ní dhomhnaill ó searcaigh de paor, ní ghráda, ó conghaile, titley, and the most exceptional of traditional ones (ó conaire, mac grianna, perhaps even pearse ó díreáin, ó ríordáin). No autobiographies!!!!!!!
    100% agree, excellent

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