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Thread: The man from god knows where.

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    Default The man from god knows where.

    The Man From God Knows Where

    Into our townlan' on a night of snow
    rode a man from God knows where;
    None of us bade him stay or go,
    nor deemed him friend, nor damned him foe,
    but we stabled his big roan mare;
    for in our townlan' we're decent folk,
    and if he didn't speak, why none of us spoke,
    and we sat till the fire burned low.

    We're a civil sort in our wee place
    so we made the circle wide
    round Andy Lemon's cheerful blaze,
    and wished the man his length of days
    and a good end to his ride.
    He smiled in under his slouchy hat,
    says he: 'There's a bit of a joke in that,
    for we ride different ways.'

    The whiles we smoked we watched him stare
    from his seat fornenst the glow.
    I nudged Joe Moore: 'You wouldn't dare
    to ask him who he's for meeting there,
    and how far he has got to go?'
    And Joe wouldn't dare, nor Wully Scott,
    And he took no drink - neither cold nor hot,
    this man from God knows where.

    It was closing time, and late forbye,
    when us ones braved the air.
    I never saw worse (may I live or die)
    than the sleet that night, an' I says, says I:
    'You'll find he's for stopping there.'
    But at screek o'day, through the gable pane
    I watched him spur in the peltin' rain,
    an' I juked from his rovin' eye.

    Two winters more, then the Trouble year,
    when the best that a man could feel
    was the pike that he kept in hidin's near,
    till the blood o' hate an' the blood o' fear
    would be redder nor rust on the steel.
    Us ones quet from mindin' the farms
    Let them take what we gave wi' the weight o' our arms
    from Saintfield to Kilkeel.

    In the time o' the Hurry, we had no lead
    we all of us fought with the rest
    an' if e'er a one shook like a tremblin' reed,
    none of us gave neither hint nor heed,
    nor ever even'd we'd guessed.
    We men of the North had a word to say,
    an'we said it then, in our own dour way,
    an' we spoke as we thought was best.

    All Ulster over, the weemin cried
    for the stan'in' crops on the lan'.
    Many's the sweetheart and many's the bride
    would liefer ha' gone to where he died,
    and ha' mourned her lone by her man.
    But us ones weathered the thick of it
    and we used to dander along and sit
    in Andy's, side by side.

    What with discourse goin' to and fro,
    the night would be wearin' thin,
    yet never so late when we rose to go
    but someone would say: 'do ye min' thon' snow,
    an 'the man who came wanderin'in?'
    and we be to fall to the talk again,
    if by any chance he was one o' them
    The man who went like the win'.

    Well 'twas gettin' on past the heat o' the year
    when I rode to Newtown fair;
    I sold as I could (the dealers were near
    only three pounds eight for the Innish steer,
    an' nothin' at all for the mare!)
    I met M'Kee in the throng o' the street,
    says he: 'The grass has grown under our feet
    since they hanged young Warwick here.',

    And he told me that Boney had promised help
    to a man in Dublin town.
    Says he: 'If you've laid the pike on the shelf,
    you'd better go home hot-fut by yourself,
    an' once more take it down.'
    So by Comber road I trotted the grey
    and never cut corn until Killyleagh
    stood plain on the risin' groun'.

    For a wheen o' days we sat waitin' the word
    to rise and go at it like men,
    but no French ships sailed into Cloughey Bay
    and we heard the black news on a harvest day
    that the cause was lost again;
    and Joey and me, and Wully Boy Scott,
    we agreed to ourselves we'd as lief as not
    ha' been found in the thick o' the slain.

    By Downpatrick goal I was bound to fare
    on a day I'll remember, feth;
    for when I came to the prison square
    the people were waitin' in hundreds there
    an' you wouldn't hear stir nor breath!
    For the sodgers were standing, grim an' tall,
    round a scaffold built there foment the wall,
    an' a man stepped out for death!

    I was brave an' near to the edge of the throng,
    yet I knowed the face again,
    an' I knowed the set, an' I knowed the walk
    an' the sound of his strange up-country talk,
    for he spoke out right an' plain.
    Then he bowed his head to the swinging rope,
    whiles I said 'Please God' to his dying hope
    and 'Amen' to his dying prayer
    that the wrong would cease and the right prevail,
    for the man that they hanged at Downpatrick gaol
    was the Man from God knows where!


    Acknowledgement: Dennis Carroll "The Man from God Knows Where: Thomas Russell 1767 - 1803"

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
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    'While the Orange Lilies Grow'

    0 Thou, who nerved our fathers in days of old.

    Grant we, their children, in heart may not grow cold

    To fight with courage in this northern land

    For what they fought, our own dear native land.

    Shall we yield the walls of Derry or Enniskillen's plain,

    Where the ashes of our fathers in peaceful sleep remain?

    Loud rings the voice of Ulster as she answers proudly: No;

    What our fathers won we'll hold, while the Orange Lilies grow!



    That their ideals, for which they bravely drew the sword,

    May still be ours to keep, we will with courage guard;

    For we've done all that men can do to placate our ancient foe.

    With every' claim we render their demands the greater grow.

    We have our last concession given, the last inch which we will yield

    Ere we spring to arms to defend our cause; may Heaven be our shield.

    For we've decided, come what may, through happiness or woe,

    What our fathers won we'll hold, while the Orange Lilies grow.



    How my heart does thrill with joy, ever since I first have seen

    All the fertile plains of Ulster, her hills and valleys green.

    And what rapture fills my soul when praises meet are paid

    To the manhood of her sons and the beauty of her maids.

    0, proud I am of this fair land, the land where I was born;

    Where liberty is held most dear, and deceit is held in scorn.

    Still a greater pride, a greater joy is mine, because I know

    What our fathers won we'll hold, while the Orange Lilies grow...
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

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    Politics.ie Member O'Sullivan Bere's Avatar
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    Hi Uncle Sam!
    When freedom was denied you,
    And imperial might defied you,
    Who was it stood beside you
    At Quebec and Brandywine?

    And dared retreats and dangers,
    Red-coats and Hessian strangers,
    In the lean, long-rifled Rangers,
    And the Pennsylvania Line!

    Hi! Uncle Sam!
    Wherever there was fighting,
    Or wrong that needed writing,
    An Ulsterman was sighting
    His Kentucky gun with care:

    All the road to Yorktown,
    From Lexington to Yorktown,
    From Valley Forge to Yorktown,
    That Ulsterman was there!

    Hi! Uncle Sam!
    Virginia sent her brave men,
    The North paraded grave men,
    That they might not be slavemen,
    But ponder this with calm:

    The first to face the Tory,
    And the first to lift Old Glory,
    Made your war an Ulster story:
    Think it over, Uncle Sam!

    --W. F. Marshall

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    Politics.ie Member O'Sullivan Bere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starfire View Post
    The Man From God Knows Where

    . . .

    Acknowledgement: Dennis Carroll "The Man from God Knows Where: Thomas Russell 1767 - 1803"
    Great poem IMO by Florence Mary Addy Wilson and did so using her name at a time when women often had to hide it under a male nom de plume.

    Florence Mary Wilson | My Families

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    Politics.ie Member InsideImDancing's Avatar
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    Sport socks! Geeeet your sport socks! Two for a poun! A poun a pair!
    Police ombudsman Nula O'loan - We found collusion on a massive scale, murders, intimidation, directing terrorism, attempted murder, drug smuggling, the list of crimes is endless..

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    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
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    do you ever sleep? ya muppet...
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

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    Politics.ie Member InsideImDancing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by between the bridges View Post
    do you ever sleep? ya muppet...
    Hoil may beck!!!

    Not with this level of zangover, no.
    Police ombudsman Nula O'loan - We found collusion on a massive scale, murders, intimidation, directing terrorism, attempted murder, drug smuggling, the list of crimes is endless..

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    Politics.ie Member between the bridges's Avatar
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    zangover will paying moi a visit in the mornin after her indoors does her yosser impression...
    Nec Aspera Terrent..Is Tuaisceart-Éireannach mé. Má tá meas agat ar mo chultúr, beidh meas agam ar do chultúr.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by between the bridges View Post
    do you ever sleep? ya muppet...


    I try to avoid that slice of death as much as possible - no doubt you relish it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starfire View Post
    I try to avoid that slice of death as much as possible - no doubt you relish it.
    Almost poetic .

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