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Thread: The UK plan to use Ireland as a site (or dump) for their ghastly Wind Turbines.

  1. #1
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    Default The UK plan to use Ireland as a site (or dump) for their ghastly Wind Turbines.

    The UK plan to use Ireland as a site (or dump) for their ghastly Wind Turbines.

    Recently the UK Government decided to effectively ban any further Land Based Wind farms on its UK territory. Their preferred option is to locate their Wind farms off shore. You just cannot beat ingenuity as rather than bear the cost of building turbines at sea they plan to build them on Ireland.

    Rather than locating wind-turbines on the optimum sites the plan is to locate them in the midlands and to make up for the loss of output from using less optimum sites by simply building extra turbines to meet project demand.

    Farmers are being enticed to enter agreements to locate massive turbines on their land that will blight properties outside the footprint of the site owners lands.

    Few farmers have any real insight into the real commercial value of a site. A farmer might get a few thousand a year from a trubine that is rated to produce 3,000 KW per hour.

    The long term benefit to the economy will be practically negligible as the little people will not be getting the bulk of the annual revenue form electricity sales.

    In short The UK will gain most of the benefits while avoiding the environmental blight and allowing a few crumbs to fall in Ireland.

    One off the yarns being spun is that Ihat Ireland has the best wind resource in Europe. (Why not build them in Scotland which would not require an expensive undersea connector?

    Irish Planners are seen as soft marks hungry for a whiff of development that will provide more rates to support senior administration jobs in our County Councils. Well meaning politicians are easily taken in to buy into this outrageous proposal.

    Minister signals end of the wind farm: We can't pepper turbines across the country - enough is enough, declares energy minister | Mail Online

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/hughes-windpower.pdf

    CIVITAS: the Institute for the Study of Civil Society

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/IBL-Green-Jobs-May-2010.pdf

    The extraordinary safety of nuclear power | Roger Helmer MEP

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/hughes-windpower.pdf
    Last edited by Bobcolebrooke; 25th January 2013 at 12:27 AM.

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    Default The UK plan to use Ireland as a site (or dump) for their gastly Wind Turbines

    The UK plan to use Ireland as a site (or dump) for their gastly Wind Turbines.

    Recently the UK Government decided to effectively ban any further Land Based Wind farms on its UK territory. Their preferred option is to locate their Wind farms off shore. You just cannot beat ingenuity as rather than bear the cost of building turbines at sea they plan to build them on Ireland.

    Rather than locating wind-turbines on the optimum sites the plan is to locate them in the midlands and to make up for the loss of output from using less optimum sites by simply building extra turbines to meet project demand.

    Farmers are being enticed to enter agreements to locate massive turbines on their land that will blight properties outside the footprint of the site owners lands.

    Few farmers have any real insight into the real commercial value of a site.


    The long term benefit to the economy will be practically negligible as the little people will not be getting the bulk of the annual revenue form electricity sales.

    In Short The UK will gain any benefits while avoiding the environmental blight.

    A number yarns are being spun:
    (1) That Ireland has the best wind resource. (Why not build them in Scotland which would not require an expensive undersea connector?
    (2) That the offer will disappear after 2020


    The Constitution lays claim to all potential energy sources on behalf of the State.

    "Article 10

    1. All natural resources, including the air and all forms of potential energy, within the jurisdiction of the Parliament and Government established by this Constitution and all royalties and franchises within that jurisdiction belong to the State subject to all estates and interests therein for the time being lawfully vested in any person or body."


    Will the State be paid any royalties?

    Minister signals end of the wind farm: We can't pepper turbines across the country - enough is enough, declares energy minister | Mail Online

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/hughes-windpower.pdf

    http://www.civitas.org.uk/economy/el...ycosts2012.pdf

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/IBL-Green-Jobs-May-2010.pdf

    http://tinyurl.com/844pnn7
    Last edited by Bobcolebrooke; 25th January 2013 at 01:49 AM.

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    Default Giant Wind Turbines to Export Electricity to England

    Yes! We're all going to be rich-provided 'we' are landowners in a windy [formerly God-forsaken] spot.
    A fast bit of work from the unlikely source of Pat Rabitte, and HMG are signed up to pay quality English money for an honest day's megawatts, transmitted through an interconnector.
    BBC News - Ireland to build 'giant' wind turbines to power UK homes
    Seems like a good deal, and saving the world as well.

    'May the wind be always at your back', as we say

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    Quote Originally Posted by clonycavanman View Post
    Yes! We're all going to be rich-provided 'we' are landowners in a windy [formerly God-forsaken] spot.
    A fast bit of work from the unlikely source of Pat Rabitte, and HMG are signed up to pay quality English money for an honest day's megawatts, transmitted through an interconnector.
    BBC News - Ireland to build 'giant' wind turbines to power UK homes
    Seems like a good deal, and saving the world as well.

    'May the wind be always at your back', as we say

    Thread here already
    http://www.politics.ie/forum/environ...-turbines.html

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    This will not end well, except for some. It was a lead story on BBC news this morning, with much on how popular resistance had prevented this happening in England. Instead they send Ireland the problem.
    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it." - Upton Sinclair.

  6. #6

    Default

    So not content to join the existing debate on the subject where it has been discussed all day, you decide to start another thread to spread your badly informed slurry on and then you go on to duplicate it.

    At least we now know your opinion

    Perhaps when a mod comes along to clean up the dirty nappy of the duplication, they might consider a merge? purely for the sake of tidyness
    Best regards, Pat.Twitter-energy economy news _ _ Each to their ability, together we progress.

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    Wind power is a capital-intensive means of generating electricity. As such, it competes with electricity generated by nuclear or coal-firedgenerating plants (with or without carbon capture).

    However, because wind power is intermittent, the management of electricity systems becomes increasingly difficult if the share of wind power in total system capacity approaches or exceeds the minimum level of demand during the year (base load).
    It is expensive and inefficient to run large nuclear or coal plants so that their output matches fluctuations in demand. Large investments in wind power are therefore to undermine the economics of investing in nuclear or coal-fired capacity.

    The problems posed by the intermittency of wind power can, in principle, be addressed by (a) complementary investments in pumped storage, and/or (b) long distance transmission to smooth out wind availability, and/or (c) transferring electricity demand from peak to off-peak periods by time of day pricing and related policies.

    However, if the economics of such options were genuinely attractive, they would already be adopted
    on a much larger scale today because similar considerations apply in any system with large amounts of either nuclear or coal generation.

    In practice, it is typically much cheaper to transport gas and to rely upon open cycle gas turbines to match supply and demand than to adopt any of these options.

    As a consequence, any large scale investment in wind power will have to be backed up by an equivalent investment in gas-fired open cycle plants.

    These are quite cheap to build but they operate at relatively low levels of thermal efficiency, so they emit
    considerably more CO2 per MWh of electricity than combined cycle gas
    plants.

    Meeting the UK Government’s target for renewable generation in 2020 will require total wind capacity of 36 GW backed up by 13 GW of open cycle gas plants plus large complementary investments in transmission
    capacity – the Wind Scenario.

    The same electricity demand could be met from 21.5 GW of combined cycle gas plants with a capital cost of
    13 billion – the Gas Scenario. Allowing for the shorter life of wind turbines, the comparative investment outlays would be about 120 billion for the Wind Scenario and a mere 13 for the Gas Scenario.

    Wind farms have relatively high operating and maintenance cost but they require no fuel. Overall, the net saving in fuel, operating and maintenance costs for the Wind Scenario relative to the Gas Scenario
    is less than 500 million per year, a very poor return on an additional investment of over 105 billion.

    http://docs.wind-watch.org/hughes-windpower.pdf
    Last edited by Bobcolebrooke; 25th January 2013 at 02:07 AM.

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    Politics.ie Member Marcos the black's Avatar
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    So, we export wind powered electricity. Wasn't that the plan?
    You'll never go broke appealing to the lowest common denominator.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcos the black View Post
    So, we export wind powered electricity. Wasn't that the plan?


    Who exactly are we paleface? How much are you getting out of it?

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    Makes sense. The English will have to pave over their countryside to build housing for all the immigrants so we might as well get in on the scam and disfigure our hillsides.

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