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Thread: How well trained are teachers in spotting abuse ?

  1. #1
    Dylan2010
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    Default How well trained are teachers in spotting abuse ?

    I had a very disturbing story related to me where on the back of an innocuous comment by their child (with no other evidence) the school called social services on the family with the whole shebang of separate interviews and having to pay a doctor for a medical check. Essentially what had happened was that the child’s dad had grabbed the kid to stop them falling after having a bath. This got translated the next day by the child saying “my dad grabbed me by the neck” the teacher then reported it to the principal who clearly did nothing except call social services. The family in question are a normal family and not some problem family on a council estate.
    We have normally told our kids to be open with the teachers but now do I have to consider telling the kids never say anything private to the teacher unless you’ve cleared it with us first? I’d hope my kids teachers are granted the same common sense most of us have but then it begs the question, is their training undermining their common sense, ie instead of looking for a pattern of things being wrong they are being told to report everything? Or was that family simply the unluckiest in Ireland?
    For an honest family its hard to think of anything more embarrassing and it may involve the kids having to change schools if the staff cant be trusted to be reasonable. What does it say about social services, have they so little to do that can be called out on a whim?

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    Probably some silly 25 year old who thinks that having a degree equates to having acquired wisdom.

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    [QUOTE=Dylan2010;6314947] The family in question are a normal family and not some problem family on a council estate.

    First of all, there are many problem families outside of council estates. Having said that, it does appear to have been an over reaction but it can be put down in part to a fear among people in many posts that they will some day be accused of ignoring abuse. A teacher now cannot give a small child a hug if they fall since it could be misconstrued.

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    Politics.ie Member Prester Jim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    I had a very disturbing story related to me where on the back of an innocuous comment by their child (with no other evidence) the school called social services on the family with the whole shebang of separate interviews and having to pay a doctor for a medical check. Essentially what had happened was that the child’s dad had grabbed the kid to stop them falling after having a bath. This got translated the next day by the child saying “my dad grabbed me by the neck” the teacher then reported it to the principal who clearly did nothing except call social services. The family in question are a normal family and not some problem family on a council estate.
    We have normally told our kids to be open with the teachers but now do I have to consider telling the kids never say anything private to the teacher unless you’ve cleared it with us first? I’d hope my kids teachers are granted the same common sense most of us have but then it begs the question, is their training undermining their common sense, ie instead of looking for a pattern of things being wrong they are being told to report everything? Or was that family simply the unluckiest in Ireland?
    For an honest family its hard to think of anything more embarrassing and it may involve the kids having to change schools if the staff cant be trusted to be reasonable. What does it say about social services, have they so little to do that can be called out on a whim?
    This is a dangerous attitude, I am married to a social worker and she says it is accepted that abuse is preety much as common in middle class and upper households; they are just a hell of a lot better at hiding it and they know their rights very, very well.
    This does seem a bit too quick to jump to conclusions in this case.
    However, the new legislation for child protection says it is a criminal offence to not pass on any concerns, better safe then sorry.

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    "The family in question are a normal family and not some problem family on a council estate."
    ?

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    Was there a bruise on the child's neck? I can't imagine that sort of situation would be very common. I would rather a teacher be over-zealous if it means catching one abusive parent and putting two other innocent parents through some embarrassment and hassle.
    Repeal the 27th.

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    The teacher had no choice but to follow the child protection policy and pass this on to the designated liason person (usually the Principal) in her school. She is obliged by law under the child protection guidelines to do this.

  8. #8
    Dylan2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prester Jim View Post
    This is a dangerous attitude, I am married to a social worker and she says it is accepted that abuse is preety much as common in middle class and upper households; they are just a hell of a lot better at hiding it and they know their rights very, very well.
    This does seem a bit too quick to jump to conclusions in this case.
    However, the new legislation for child protection says it is a criminal offence to not pass on any concerns, better safe then sorry.
    but accusations based on the most flimsy of evidence could damage families or family's relationship with the school. Any primary teacher at least should have a reasonable sense of a kid's demeanour changing or getting a sense of things not being quite right, or in a situation like above the teacher can always chat to the child and what not to see if there is any concern to be had. People would be on to a solicitor if a shop accued someone in the wrong of shoplifting, how much worse is it to be accused of abuse?

  9. #9
    Dylan2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by cricket View Post
    "The family in question are a normal family and not some problem family on a council estate."
    ?


    there is a statistical link between poverty and abuse

    Poverty and child maltreatment

    Key points:


    •a number of prevalence and incidence studies have highlighted the link between poverty and some forms of child maltreatment, especially neglect, emotional and physical abuse


    •while the research shows an association between neglect and poverty, it does not mean that poverty causes neglect or abuse - the majority of families living in poverty do not maltreat their children and parent effectively


    •there are no large-scale studies that specifically examine the nature of the relationship between poverty and child maltreatment in the UK, but the most common explanation centres on the stress factors associated with poverty and social deprivation, which are further compounded if drug misuse and mental health issues come into play.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylan2010 View Post
    but accusations based on the most flimsy of evidence could damage families or family's relationship with the school. Any primary teacher at least should have a reasonable sense of a kid's demeanour changing or getting a sense of things not being quite right, or in a situation like above the teacher can always chat to the child and what not to see if there is any concern to be had. People would be on to a solicitor if a shop accued someone in the wrong of shoplifting, how much worse is it to be accused of abuse?



    Teachers legally have to report any incident brought to their attention to the Designated Person in their school under Child Protection Guidelines - normally to the Principal. If the school decided not to bother reporting the incident and then something more serious happened would you not then say the school were wrong to ignore the first incident? No one ever knows what goes on behind closed doors - what should the school have done? Ring the potential abuser and accept their version of events! - teachers are not trained to deal with such incidents so reporting anything suspicious is all they can do.

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