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Thread: Audio Podcast - Revisionism, Peter Hart and the History Wars.

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    Politics.ie Member cb1979's Avatar
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    Default Audio Podcast - Revisionism, Peter Hart and the History Wars.

    Episode Eleven of the History Show on Near FM presented by John Dorney and Cathal Brennan. In this episode, John Dorney speaks to Dr. John M. Regan of the University of Dundee about Revisionism, Peter Hart and the History Wars in Ireland.

    Near Podcasts The History Show Episode Eleven

    Previous episodes of the History Show are available here:
    Near Podcasts The History Show

    The release of Terror in Ireland: 1916 - 1923 by the Trinity History Workshop led to a spat between Dr. John M. Regan and Professor David Fitzpatrick, the editor of the collection, in the pages of History Ireland. Episode Six of the History Show featured an interview with Professor Fitzpatrick about the book. Near Podcasts The History Show Episode Six

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    Thanks, CB 1979. I'll have to have a listen to this.

    The latest issue of "History Ireland" had to hold over further volleys in this debate due to lack of space in the printed edition but they did say that they would be available on their website.

    I heard Regan speak at a talk in Cork last year and he was very impressive. The attendance was huge and many had to listen in adjoining rooms such was the turnout. His views on Irish historiography are invigorating and he certainly drew the wrath of UCC historians, past and present, on that occasion, although the latter drew the wrath of the majority of the audience in their turn.

    History makes us what we are.

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    Excellent stuff. Thanks for posting.

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    Politics.ie Member cb1979's Avatar
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    Here is a video of the History Ireland Hedge School debate involving Regan, Fitzpatrick, Eve Morrison and John Borgonovo entitled War of Independence - 'Four Glorious Years' or a squalid sectarian conflict.

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    Peter Hart is totally discredited as a historian.

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    Politics.ie Member DaveM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb1979 View Post
    Episode Eleven of the History Show on Near FM presented by John Dorney and Cathal Brennan. In this episode, John Dorney speaks to Dr. John M. Regan of the University of Dundee about Revisionism, Peter Hart and the History Wars in Ireland.

    Near Podcasts The History Show Episode Eleven

    Previous episodes of the History Show are available here:
    Near Podcasts The History Show

    The release of Terror in Ireland: 1916 - 1923 by the Trinity History Workshop led to a spat between Dr. John M. Regan and Professor David Fitzpatrick, the editor of the collection, in the pages of History Ireland. Episode Six of the History Show featured an interview with Professor Fitzpatrick about the book. Near Podcasts The History Show Episode Six
    Cheers for the heads up.
    Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Levellers View Post
    Peter Hart is totally discredited as a historian.
    The disappearance and killing of three intelligence officers in Cork did not seem to have any connection to the so-called sectarian masscre in Bandon during the Truce according to Hart. One of the perpetrators of the killings in Cork was an atheist son of a Protestant. Some of the victims of the "massacre" were Catholic rather than exclusively Protestants. So the idea that it was a cold blooded killing of Protestants falls apart. Whether the victims were spies cannot be conclusively proven but the burden is on Hart to prove his case and he doesn't do it.
    The fact that IRA leaders including Tom Barry returned to Cork and put a stop to the bloodletting indicates that it was likely a local IRA individuals doing a solo-run and rubbing out people they had suspected of collaboration during the War of Independence. The killings therefore followed the pattern of other conflicts in which there was a settling of old scores for instance in France after WW2 thousands of collaborators were killed.

    A similar sectarianism argument was made during the Troubles in Northern Ireland when rural Protestant men were being killed by IRA assassins. Many of these men were in fact members of the UDR and RUC reserve and/or members of the UDA and UVF. As well as being members of the security forces many were also members of the Orange Order and in some cases elected members of Unionists parties. Others were probably completely innocent men. However the religion of these men was selected as the sole reason for their deaths. Without knowing the background facts of victims of the IRA it is not possible to just jump to the conclusion all these deaths were sectarian rather than considering the motivation of politics and military strategy came into it.

    Hart and other revisionist historians have an axe to grind and brush aside actual evidence.
    Rather like Oliver Stone who claims the mob/anti-Castro Cubans/CIA were involved in killing Kennedy and pinning it on Oswald while rising roughshod over the overwhelming evidence in the Warren Commission that says otherwise and that indicates strongly that Oswald acted alone.

    Revisionism does have its place in that is brings to light facts that don't fit into the traditional cosy narrative of good guys v bad guys that partisan propagandists would like us to believe in.

    A movie like The Wind That Shakes The Barley that respects the intelligence of the audience and gives a true reflection of the politics of the time is far more useful than Michael Collins which gives a stilted cartoonish version of history and a soft focus portrait of a complex figure who can still be respected without paring away his blemishes.
    Last edited by Hitch 22; 14th January 2013 at 09:26 PM.

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    Hart rightly comes in for criticism but I'll repeat for the umpteenth time that there's still a lot of good work that he produced. Read some of it first then form your opinion.

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    Politics.ie Member cb1979's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LINKS FAHREN View Post

    I heard Regan speak at a talk in Cork last year and he was very impressive. The attendance was huge and many had to listen in adjoining rooms such was the turnout. His views on Irish historiography are invigorating and he certainly drew the wrath of UCC historians, past and present, on that occasion, although the latter drew the wrath of the majority of the audience in their turn.

    History makes us what we are.
    He wrote a very interesting book called the Irish Counter Revolution 1921 - 1936 which is well worth a read for anyone who hasn't come across it.

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    Politics.ie Member former wesleyan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LINKS FAHREN View Post
    Thanks, CB 1979. I'll have to have a listen to this.

    The latest issue of "History Ireland" had to hold over further volleys in this debate due to lack of space in the printed edition but they did say that they would be available on their website.

    I heard Regan speak at a talk in Cork last year and he was very impressive. The attendance was huge and many had to listen in adjoining rooms such was the turnout. His views on Irish historiography are invigorating and he certainly drew the wrath of UCC historians, past and present, on that occasion, although the latter drew the wrath of the majority of the audience in their turn.

    History makes us what we are.
    I was at that. The " wrath " of the audience as you put it consisted of keepers of the flame standing up and denying that any true republican could have soiled his hands with a bit of the ould sectarian cleansing. This despite a copy of the " spy on your protestant neighbour " form being displayed on the backscreen.
    "What Michael Collins accepted in '22,De Valera accepted in'27 and Gerry Adams accepted in '98.Sooner or later they all come around to accepting the Treaty"

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