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Thread: Irish education question

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    Default Irish education question

    How common was teaching all subjects through Irish in Irish state schools since 1922? I have become embroiled in a debate on this elsewhere and I would like to get my hands on some good links that establish the facts.

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    Politics.ie Member Rural's Avatar
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    My Father (83 this year) did all his subjects through Irish, even Latin. North Mon. in Cork City.
    Disclosures Tribunal - #OnlyForTheTape...

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    Politics.ie Member Sister Mercedes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ardillaun View Post
    How common was teaching all subjects through Irish in Irish state schools since 1922? I have become embroiled in a debate on this elsewhere and I would like to get my hands on some good links that establish the facts.
    My mother was educated in a Convent-run State School in Tipperary in the 1940's and early 1950's, and all subjects were taught through Irish, even Maths. She resented it all of her life.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sister Mercedes View Post
    My mother was educated in a Convent-run State School in Tipperary in the 1940's and early 1950's, and all subjects were taught through Irish, even Maths. She resented it all of her life.
    I find this weird. I also find it fascinating, and I'd like to understand more about her feelings on the matter - and other people's feelings, too. My own mother also received her secondary education through Irish, and had no gripes about it, quite the opposite, she found it a positive addition to her education that ensured that she could speak a second language fluently, a language that gave her a better understanding of her countries past particularly through songs and poetry learned at school.

    So I'd be really interested in finding out more about your mother's experience. I wonder if you would mind answering some questions on your mother's experience?
    1. Why did she resent it?
    2. What exactly did she resent about it?
    3. Was the education somehow worse because it was in Irish?
    4. Who did she blame - her parents, the state, the nuns?

    Many thanks for your contribution.

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    its interesting. People today bitch that Irish is not taught properly in schools i.e after 12 years they cannot speak a word, but neglect to mention any footdragging on their part. There was a time when you came out of school more or less fluent in the language and definitely able to work in the civil service and people bitch. why?

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    Politics.ie Member Cellach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Claudius View Post
    There was a time when you came out of school more or less fluent in the language
    Was there?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cellach View Post
    Was there?
    obviously it depends on the person but I meet people in their forties who would not speak Irish on a daily basis yet if they need to speak it they can. They learnt Irish through the medium of Irish. these days, you start secondary school and go over the basics again. One wonders what they did in six years of primary school.

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    Politics.ie Member Sister Mercedes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barroso View Post
    I find this weird. I also find it fascinating, and I'd like to understand more about her feelings on the matter - and other people's feelings, too. My own mother also received her secondary education through Irish, and had no gripes about it, quite the opposite, she found it a positive addition to her education that ensured that she could speak a second language fluently, a language that gave her a better understanding of her countries past particularly through songs and poetry learned at school.

    So I'd be really interested in finding out more about your mother's experience. I wonder if you would mind answering some questions on your mother's experience?
    1. Why did she resent it?
    2. What exactly did she resent about it?
    3. Was the education somehow worse because it was in Irish?
    4. Who did she blame - her parents, the state, the nuns?

    Many thanks for your contribution.
    Irish was not a language that she knew outside of school. Her parents didn't know how to speak it, and English was the language that was spoken in the family home and among friends. So, to try to understand complex Maths is tough enough, but to try to understand it when it was being taught it in, what is in effect, a foreign language, was doubly, trebly, difficult.

    My mother did not complete Secondary School, and did not go to University, even though in later life she was considered quite bright and well informed from self-educating. She didn't blame her parents; they had no option but to send her to the local State School. She blamed the State.

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    Politics.ie Member bluefirelog's Avatar
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    Both my parents said they did everything in school through Irish...

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    Thumbs down

    IMHO Most teaching of subjects through Irish is done in a horrible Béarlachas.

    Chemistry is a very good example.
    Hydrogen: focal.ie - Dictionary of Irish Terms - Foclóir Téarmaíochta

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