Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 38 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 374

Thread: Religion in Northern Ireland

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member Drogheda445's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Drawda
    Posts
    6,520
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Religion in Northern Ireland

    It's often said that nationalists are predominantly Catholic and unionists are predominantly Protestant. Indeed sometimes they become interchangeable and Protestant/Catholic are used to mean unionist/nationalist. Sometimes they are even combined into their own labels, such as the acronyms PUL (Protestant Unionist Loyalist) and CNR (Catholic Nationalist Republican).

    I think the use of these terms, whilst obviously excluding "opposing" religions from holding the "opposite" view; Catholic Unionist and Protestant Nationalist, I think in a Northern Ireland that is becoming more secular and even more irreligious, these terms can be misleading and assume that a political allegiance is inevitably tied to a religion.

    Since we have seen a gradual trend towards non-religion in Northern Ireland, and more people of both religions holding both political allegiances, I think the political terms Unionists and Nationalists should simply be used on its own when describing the communities, not because I am offended but because I think it would be more applicable. NR and UL maybe?

    Out of interest as an agnostic, how many people on this forum would describe themselves as truly Protestant/Catholic/other religion and how many are religiously speaking non-religious?

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member InsideImDancing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Everywhere!
    Posts
    21,877
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I think it's pretty plain at this stage that NI's problems are not really about religion and haven't really been for a long time. It's about National identity/sovereignty. It just so happens that the vast majority of Nationalist/Unionists are Catholics/Protestants and we all know the historical reasons for that.

    I'd probably turn Prod if I thought I was getting a UI out of it tbh. Does anybody really believe that, if there is a God, he would identify as a Prod or a Catholic?
    Police ombudsman Nula O'loan - We found collusion on a massive scale, murders, intimidation, directing terrorism, attempted murder, drug smuggling, the list of crimes is endless..

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member belfast1981's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    3,630
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    I don't consider myself to be protestant because I don't have anything to do with the Christian religion. I believe that Catholic/Protestant are nothing but varients of a larger religion (Christian) And since I am not christian I can not call myself protestant or catholic.

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    8,187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by belfast1981 View Post
    I believe that Catholic/Protestant are nothing but varients of a larger religion (Christian)
    A point frequently forgotten by bigots on both sides.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    It's often said that nationalists are predominantly Catholic and unionists are predominantly Protestant. Indeed sometimes they become interchangeable and Protestant/Catholic are used to mean unionist/nationalist. Sometimes they are even combined into their own labels, such as the acronyms PUL (Protestant Unionist Loyalist) and CNR (Catholic Nationalist Republican).

    I think the use of these terms, whilst obviously excluding "opposing" religions from holding the "opposite" view; Catholic Unionist and Protestant Nationalist, I think in a Northern Ireland that is becoming more secular and even more irreligious, these terms can be misleading and assume that a political allegiance is inevitably tied to a religion.

    Since we have seen a gradual trend towards non-religion in Northern Ireland, and more people of both religions holding both political allegiances, I think the political terms Unionists and Nationalists should simply be used on its own when describing the communities, not because I am offended but because I think it would be more applicable. NR and UL maybe?

    Out of interest as an agnostic, how many people on this forum would describe themselves as truly Protestant/Catholic/other religion and how many are religiously speaking non-religious?
    I'm a short strand fenian (translates to..worlds worst fenian )...so there you have it

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member ArtyisBack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Coleraine
    Posts
    6,079
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Catholic first Irish second
    http://ulstersdoomed.blogspot.com/ http://www.requetes.com
    For unionism this is as good as it gets, for nationalism this is the worse it can be.

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Legolas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Northern Ireland, UK.
    Posts
    2,833
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    In my view the conflict is simply about Nationality/Identity. Religion is a no go area, and as times go on Christianity will dwindle in the western world.

  8. #8
    Castle Ray
    Guest

    Default

    Organised religion is not for me. I have never been a member of any religion and cannot envisage me being a member of any. I'm fascinated by religions, faiths and beliefs and am open to learning about them, but the more disciplined and therefor controlling it is, the more a religion makes me recoil from it.

    I don't care what church someone goes to and how much they're into it, I just think whoever it is should not attempt to organise and dictate anyone else's life. That's the point where I oppose their viewpoint regardless if whether I understand where they're coming from or not.

    That said, Northern Ireland and Northern Irish people are better off in a union of these isles and the inclusive British community of these isles and their regions with regional identities respected throughout in the UK.

    Make of that what you want Drogheda, hopefully I've addressed your OP?

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member O'Sullivan Bere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    13,662
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Drogheda445 View Post
    . . . Out of interest as an agnostic, how many people on this forum would describe themselves as truly Protestant/Catholic/other religion and how many are religiously speaking non-religious?
    With my background and experiences, the faster mixing religion with politics gets shown the door the better. It's been a disaster for Ireland, the Muslim world, Continental Europe in the past, etc. I don't even like to see it in the US now and they started off with constitutional admonitions against it...always trouble.


  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member Ren84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Free Europe
    Posts
    49,865
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Nationalism has moved firmly past religion and appeals to all demographics. Unfortunately the same cannot be said of the mono cultural dinosaur that is unionism and their constant need to appeal exclusively to the "Protestant people", as we're currently seeing with the flag riots.

Page 1 of 38 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •