Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 96

Thread: Dicussion of Shared Moral Values for Society

  1. #1
    Politics.ie Member rockofcashel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,955
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default Dicussion of Shared Moral Values for Society

    Hello people.. just wondering if people would like to lend a hand or contribute to an assignment I am helping someone with.

    It's a social philosophy assignment regarding the value of shared moral values for society. He was also asked to include the socio political ideals of Thomas Paine and the concept of liberalism as outline by JS Mill and John Rawls..

    What is the importance of these ideas or ideals for modern society ?

    Is there even a "modern society" nowadays ?

    What is the role of Communitarianism is any such discussion ?


    This isn't a political discussion per se, but obviously their are many political elements to such a discussion regarding shared moral values.. anyone like to contribute ?
    1,197 people agree with me.. how many agree with you ?

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member Niall996's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,770
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    What does 'moral' mean?
    Bringing reconciliation, mutual respect and cross community understanding to Northern Ireland through facts

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member rockofcashel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,955
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Morality (from the Latin moralitas "manner, character, proper behavior") is the differentiation of intentions, decisions, and actions between those that are "good" (or right) and those that are "bad" (or wrong). The philosophy of morality is ethics. A moral code is a system of morality (according to a particular philosophy, religion, culture, etc.) and a moral is any one practice or teaching within a moral code. Morality may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness." Immorality is the active opposition to morality (i.e. opposition to that which is good or right), while amorality is variously defined as an unawareness of, indifference toward, or disbelief in any set of moral standards or principles.[1][2][3][4] An example of a moral code is the Golden Rule which states that, "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself."[5]
    1,197 people agree with me.. how many agree with you ?

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member rockofcashel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,955
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    “ The first man who, having fenced in a piece of land, said "This is mine," and found people na´ve enough to believe him, that man was the true founder of civil society. From how many crimes, wars, and murders, from how many horrors and misfortunes might not any one have saved mankind, by pulling up the stakes, or filling up the ditch, and crying to his fellows: Beware of listening to this impostor; you are undone if you once forget that the fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody. ”

    — Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality, 1754
    1,197 people agree with me.. how many agree with you ?

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member Niall996's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,770
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockofcashel View Post
    Morality (from the Latin moralitas "manner, character, proper behavior") is the differentiation of intentions, decisions, and actions between those that are "good" (or right) and those that are "bad" (or wrong). The philosophy of morality is ethics. A moral code is a system of morality (according to a particular philosophy, religion, culture, etc.) and a moral is any one practice or teaching within a moral code. Morality may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness." Immorality is the active opposition to morality (i.e. opposition to that which is good or right), while amorality is variously defined as an unawareness of, indifference toward, or disbelief in any set of moral standards or principles.[1][2][3][4] An example of a moral code is the Golden Rule which states that, "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself."[5]
    Is a set of 'shared moral values' something that is limited to values that all people share at some fundamental level or a majority shared system.
    Bringing reconciliation, mutual respect and cross community understanding to Northern Ireland through facts

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member linny55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cork
    Posts
    4,473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockofcashel View Post
    “ The first man who, having fenced in a piece of land, said "This is mine," and found people na´ve enough to believe him, that man was the true founder of civil society. From how many crimes, wars, and murders, from how many horrors and misfortunes might not any one have saved mankind, by pulling up the stakes, or filling up the ditch, and crying to his fellows: Beware of listening to this impostor; you are undone if you once forget that the fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody. ”

    — Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality, 1754
    yeah but did it have planning permission.

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member rockofcashel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    7,955
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall996 View Post
    Is a set of 'shared moral values' something that is limited to values that all people share at some fundamental level or a majority shared system.
    I think that is the point under discussion.

    Do we have a shared system of moral values ?

    If we do, where did it come from and is it relevant in modern society ?

    Is it fundamental, and how does it sit with different cultures ?

    Is "might" right ?
    1,197 people agree with me.. how many agree with you ?

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member The Field Marshal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    The Imperial Throne
    Posts
    44,291
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockofcashel View Post
    “ The first man who, having fenced in a piece of land, said "This is mine," and found people na´ve enough to believe him, that man was the true founder of civil society. From how many crimes, wars, and murders, from how many horrors and misfortunes might not any one have saved mankind, by pulling up the stakes, or filling up the ditch, and crying to his fellows: Beware of listening to this impostor; you are undone if you once forget that the fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody. ”

    — Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Discourse on Inequality, 1754
    Why are you quoting The Arsehole of all Arseholes?
    Repeal the thirty-fourth amendment of the Irish constitution :
    Children have a basic right to be reared by a mother and a father.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rockofcashel View Post
    I think that is the point under discussion.

    Do we have a shared system of moral values ?

    If we do, where did it come from and is it relevant in modern society ?

    Is it fundamental, and how does it sit with different cultures ?

    Is "might" right ?
    Too many people think that "might is right" relates to military and wars when in fact the most consistent instance of "might being right" is the power of the state. The laws of the state are enforced by threat of violence (incarceration, arrest, fines, barring orders from driving, in some countries execution). Without might the law would not function so therefore if you are looking for a set of shared moral values it would have to be values that function where there is no law to enforce them, otherwise they are the values of the government enforced through violence.

    Even in a democracy where governments are often elected by less than 50% of the popular vote it cannot be said that their laws are always representative of the majority of the people.
    "If we can but prevent the government from wasting the labours of the people, under the pretence of taking care of them, they must become happy." - Thomas Jefferson

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member Hewson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    On the horizon
    Posts
    8,329
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Niall996 View Post
    Is a set of 'shared moral values' something that is limited to values that all people share at some fundamental level or a majority shared system.
    The only thing that everybody shares is their humanity. We have only that in common.

    After that issues like religion, colour, history, geographical location, genetic memory and individual circumstances come into play. We're all products of our environment and we're all in a continual state of evolution.

    The philosophy of 'doing unto others as you would have them do unto you' would be a wonderful basis on which all societies could flourish. It's the fundamental ethos of Christianity, but as we've seen, putting it into practise seems to be the part where most people are stumped.
    Abortion is an act of violence. Violence demeans humanity, particularly violence against women and children.

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •