Follow @PoliticsIE
 
 
 
Page 1 of 24 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 239

Thread: Bliain na Gaeilge - an exercise in official delusion?

  1. #1

    Default Bliain na Gaeilge - an exercise in official delusion?

    Personally, I've always been sympathetic to the Irish language to the extent of having an interest in acquiring a degree of fluency, occasionally contributing to the Gaeilge forum, and defending TG4 against accusations of being a white elephant. Yet, I cannot help but feel that official campaigns such as Bliain na Gaeilge do little to promote the language, being rather dutiful exercises preaching to the converted, when the majority of linguistic revivals (Welsh, Maori and Hebrew) come about to popular groundswells of cultural opinion. Yes, businesses play a pro-active role in developing bilingualism, but unless individuals decide to take an interest themselves, such official initiatives will founder on the bedrock of popular indifference.
    My political compass:
    Economic Left/Right: -5.38
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.64

  2. #2
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    14,890
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FloatingVoterTralee View Post
    Personally, I've always been sympathetic to the Irish language to the extent of having an interest in acquiring a degree of fluency, occasionally contributing to the Gaeilge forum, and defending TG4 against accusations of being a white elephant. Yet, I cannot help but feel that official campaigns such as Bliain na Gaeilge do little to promote the language, being rather dutiful exercises preaching to the converted, when the majority of linguistic revivals (Welsh, Maori and Hebrew) come about to popular groundswells of cultural opinion. Yes, businesses play a pro-active role in developing bilingualism, but unless individuals decide to take an interest themselves, such official initiatives will founder on the bedrock of popular indifference.
    I think I'm with you on this. Very keen on the language, but very wary of official (and semi official) attempts to promote the language. They are usually impractical wooden attempts. I went to a Gaeilge Tweetup organised by an official body, and it was nothing like any other tweetup I've seen. More like a press conference, which sadly, didn't surprise me.

    Here's hoping for better, but fearing for the worst.

    D

  3. #3
    Politics.ie Member florin's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,360
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    One could argue that Irish might be stronger if we never got independence - that way, learning Irish could be a way of defying authority; as it is, ignoring Irish is a way of defying authority

  4. #4
    Politics.ie Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    753
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    TG4 = eilifint bhán

  5. #5
    Politics.ie Member FrankSpeaks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Tralee
    Posts
    4,619
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanetBertie View Post
    TG4 = eilifint bhán
    Ever try watching TG4, I doubt it, if you did you would find there are some fantastic documentaries on it.
    There's a lot to be said for the fellow who doesn't say it himself. -- Maurice Switzer

  6. #6
    Politics.ie Member blokesbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Under Sean Gallagher's Bed
    Posts
    23,227
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FloatingVoterTralee View Post
    Personally, I've always been sympathetic to the Irish language to the extent of having an interest in acquiring a degree of fluency, occasionally contributing to the Gaeilge forum, and defending TG4 against accusations of being a white elephant. Yet, I cannot help but feel that official campaigns such as Bliain na Gaeilge do little to promote the language, being rather dutiful exercises preaching to the converted, when the majority of linguistic revivals (Welsh, Maori and Hebrew) come about to popular groundswells of cultural opinion. Yes, businesses play a pro-active role in developing bilingualism, but unless individuals decide to take an interest themselves, such official initiatives will founder on the bedrock of popular indifference.
    Seem fair. I do think every effort should be made to make Irish learning accessible for any Irish person who wants it, and there should be enough publicity of the services offered so everyone knows it is there, but ultimately it is up to individuals. I've seen enough antagonism against the Irish language on the forum to know that no amount of advertising will persuade some people to learn Irish and whilst I think that's a bit sad, it has to be up to them.

    I also think any use of taxpayers money to persuade people to learn Irish (as opposed to making Irish language instruction available to all who want it) is counter-productive, because often people who dislike the language object to taxpayers money being used to promote it. So such campaigns aren't merely ineffective, but actually make things worse by entrenching prejudices against the language.

    Ultimately Irish will live or die on the basis on Irish people and their decisions about the language.

    I am hopeless at languages myself so I do sympathise with people who struggle to learn Irish, because I know from experience how difficult I found other languages at school.

    Some people just don't have an "ear" for languages and I do think that people should encourage them, and not judge them if they fail and decide it's not for them. It's not their fault they weren't brought up Irish-speaking, and some people just find it more difficult that others.

    Smugness from people who were lucky enough to learn Irish from Irish-speaking parents, or who perhaps found Irish easy at school, which I have also seen on this forum, probably does more to put people off than anything else too. If you were brought up speaking Irish you were lucky - it's not an achievement on your part.

    I can't say how I'd feel if I was Irish but I suspect I'd try to learn it - but I also suspect I'd be one of the ones who hated it at school and was put off, however much I might have wanted to learn it.
    Brexit? Never heard of it mate...

  7. #7
    Politics.ie Member Amnesiac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,034
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FloatingVoterTralee View Post
    I cannot help but feel that official campaigns such as Bliain na Gaeilge do little to promote the language, being rather dutiful exercises preaching to the converted
    +1

  8. #8
    Politics.ie Member Mushroom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Provence.
    Posts
    15,748
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrankSpeaks View Post
    Ever try watching TG4, I doubt it, if you did you would find there are some fantastic documentaries on it.
    There certainly are. Furthermore, the vast majority of them are subtitled, so lazy buggers like me who have absolutely no wish to improve their Irish can watch and enjoy them. I just wish that TG4 would subtitle their Rabo rugby games; although having Jerry Flannery delivering his "análís" as bearla is great!

  9. #9
    Politics.ie Member blokesbloke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Under Sean Gallagher's Bed
    Posts
    23,227
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PlanetBertie View Post
    TG4 = eilifint bhán
    Ah but did you learn that Irish from TG4?!
    Brexit? Never heard of it mate...

  10. #10
    Politics.ie Member Niall996's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    London
    Posts
    10,821
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    People tend to react badly to being bullied into doing things. I think there are a lot of simple little things that could be done to elevate the Irish language but it's management seems to be in the hands of an extremist fringe.
    Bringing reconciliation, mutual respect and cross community understanding to Northern Ireland through facts

Page 1 of 24 1234511 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •