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Thread: The Deportation of James Larkin from the USA

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    Politics.ie Member Cruimh's Avatar
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    Default The Deportation of James Larkin from the USA

    Must admit, I don't know a lot about Larkin - and would appreciate any recommendations in respect of biography or his role in our history. But saw this earlier and thought it merited a thread :

    Historic files from Irish Free State on James Larkin’s deportation from US released

    Governor Smith set Larkin free, stating that there was 'no evidence’ that Larkin ever endeavoured to incite any specific set of violence or lawlessness. 'The State of New York does not ask vengeance and the ends of justice have already been amply met,' Smith wrote. 'For those reasons I grant the application.'


    With these words Larkin became the recipient of the first unconditional pardon from Sing Sing that had been granted in five years.
    Considerably more detail in their linked article

    1923 docs reveal Britain’s fears over James Larkin’s return to Ireland

    and the Journal also has

    My favourite speech: Fergus Finlay · TheJournal.ie

    It was a tough time to be a socialist on either side of the Atlantic!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cruimh View Post
    It was a tough time to be a socialist on either side of the Atlantic!
    It still is!

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    Politics.ie Member Socratus O' Pericles's Avatar
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    My personal favourite figure in Irish history a truky amazing character

    bite design/graphic design consultants/cork/ireland: James Larkin
    The truth of an idea is not a stagnant property inherent in it. Truth happens to an idea. It becomes true, is made true by events.

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    Politics.ie Member Boy M5's Avatar
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    Yet again Cruimh shines a light on something interesting in Irish history that has lain outside the general discourse. Fair play to him.
    "Keep firing & don't stop until I tell you" General Tom Barry

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    Politics.ie Member darkhorse's Avatar
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    Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
    We should have never have let him back

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    Politics.ie Member neveragain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkhorse View Post
    Larkin was so far to the left, he was even expelled from the Socialist Party of America
    We should have never have let him back
    We?
    Fighting for the rights of workers in Ireland (all of it) at a time when the ordinary worker was treated like a piece of s##it was a dangerous game and Larkin played that game to the best of his ability.

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    Politics.ie Member Catalpast's Avatar
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    James Larkin died in his sleep on 30 January 1947. His funeral mass was celebrated by the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, John Charles McQuaid, and thousands lined the streets of the city as the hearse passed through on the way to Glasnevin Cemetery.
    James Larkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia







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    Politics.ie Member GabhaDubh's Avatar
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    My understanding is that both Larkin and Mellow's may have been in the "Tombs" a prison in New York together.
    The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits.”—Albert Einstein.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catalpast View Post
    James Larkin died in his sleep on 30 January 1947. His funeral mass was celebrated by the Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, John Charles McQuaid, and thousands lined the streets of the city as the hearse passed through on the way to Glasnevin Cemetery.
    James Larkin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia







    Larkin was fairly devout. He also had pretty much contempt for the Irish Communists, who included his own son. He was far too cute I'd say to have been taken in by the monstrosity that was Stalinism and he would have been fairly familiar with it having been a regular visitor and delegate to Comintern up to the late 1920s. And would have known some of the prominent victims of the purges. Jim Junior had also copped on by the mid 40s leaving the falme to be carried by various oddballs who had little or no actual connection to the Irish working class.

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    Politics.ie Member darkhorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by neveragain View Post
    We?
    Fighting for the rights of workers in Ireland (all of it) at a time when the ordinary worker was treated like a piece of s##it was a dangerous game and Larkin played that game to the best of his ability.
    Larkin was a troublemaker from start to finish ...
    He tried to organise a strike among Guinness workers in Dublin - who were among the best paid workers in the country
    Due to his reputation, he manipulated the owners of Dublin Trams to block members of his looney ITGWU union from working in their company. And as a result he suceeded in arranging the Dublin Lockout - one of the most severe strikes in Irish history - all of which was centred around membership of his union.
    After the Lockout, he went back to America and managed to cause chaos in all kinds of labour related areas due to his support of the Soviet Union. Ultimately he was convicted and jailed for anarchy in the USA - after which he was deported back to Ireland.
    Subsequently he tried to rejoin the ITGWU but got nowhere due to differences with the other members

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