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Thread: Could adapted rules in rings and darts teach arithmetic better than computer games?

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    Default Could adapted rules in rings and darts teach arithmetic better than computer games?

    Ring boards were around in my childhood in local pubs and some households,a traditional Irish game that has almost disappeared. It is a safer game for children to play than darts which pierce. Both rings and darts are fun and the latter accompanied by copious alcohol to steady the nerves of the throwing hand can be addictive!

    Adaptation of rules in these games could give practice in multiplication and division for children as well as in addition and subtraction.For example,odd numbers could trigger a multiplication of the last score on the scoreboard and even numbers a division of it.Scores could become very large so some rules on limits would be needed.Maybe the winner would be first to meet a target number by avoiding undershooting or overshooting it.

    Wouldn't this be more fun and more sociable for children than learning arithmetic from computer games?
    Last edited by patslatt; 12th December 2012 at 01:53 AM.

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    Politics.ie Member Cellach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    Ring boards were around in my childhood in local pubs and some households,a traditional Irish game that has almost disappeared. It is a safer game for children to play than darts which pierce. Both rings and darts are fun and the latter accompanied by copious alcohol to steady the nerves of the throwing hand can be addictive!

    Adaptation of rules in these games could give practice in multiplication and division for children as well as in addition and subtraction.For example,odd numbers could trigger a multiplication of the last score on the scoreboard and even numbers a division of it.Scores could become very large so some rules on limits would be needed.

    Wouldn't this be more fun and more sociable for children than learning arithmetic from computer games?
    Do children learn arithmetic from computer games?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cellach View Post
    Do children learn arithmetic from computer games?
    Education progressives encourage computer games as a means of learning.

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    It could help them count down from 501.


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    Politics.ie Member Cellach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    Education progressives encourage computer games as a means of learning.
    Ah okay. If I may offer a mild criticism that wasn't quite clear from the OP. I assume that they don't encourage computer games as a substitute for actual teaching?
    I see nothing wrong in theory with your 'Rings' idea. At what kind of a level would the decision to select computer games or traditional games as a method of supplementing learning be made?

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    You get a good idea of someone's mental faculties when you watch them go for a 126 finish with three darts in hand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cellach View Post
    Ah okay. If I may offer a mild criticism that wasn't quite clear from the OP. I assume that they don't encourage computer games as a substitute for actual teaching?
    I see nothing wrong in theory with your 'Rings' idea. At what kind of a level would the decision to select computer games or traditional games as a method of supplementing learning be made?
    As soon as kids can throw a ring with reasonable accuracy. I'd guess age 5. As for computer games,immediately in conjunction with teaching.

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    Politics.ie Member Tin Foil Hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    Ring boards were around in my childhood in local pubs and some households,a traditional Irish game that has almost disappeared. It is a safer game for children to play than darts which pierce. Both rings and darts are fun and the latter accompanied by copious alcohol to steady the nerves of the throwing hand can be addictive!

    Adaptation of rules in these games could give practice in multiplication and division for children as well as in addition and subtraction.For example,odd numbers could trigger a multiplication of the last score on the scoreboard and even numbers a division of it.Scores could become very large so some rules on limits would be needed.Maybe the winner would be first to meet a target number by avoiding undershooting or overshooting it.

    Wouldn't this be more fun and more sociable for children than learning arithmetic from computer games?

    I've a better idea. Teach kids their tables like they used to and ban calculators from primary schools and from secondary schools until senior cycle. It isn't fukking rocket surgery.

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    Politics.ie Member Cellach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patslatt View Post
    As soon as kids can throw a ring with reasonable accuracy. I'd guess age 5. As for computer games,immediately in conjunction with teaching.
    Apologies, I meant at what level would the decision be made to implement such a scheme? Teacher, principal, department?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cellach View Post
    Apologies, I meant at what level would the decision be made to implement such a scheme? Teacher, principal, department?
    As a leisure activity,it could be introduced by any teacher in the same hours as sporting activities.

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