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Thread: Census results 2011: 41% Catholic; 45% Catholic by community background

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    Default Census results 2011: 41% Catholic; 45% Catholic by community background

    Fascinating stuff Here are some key points:


    • 1.8 per cent (32,400) of the usually resident population of Northern Ireland belonged to minority ethnic groups in 2011, more than double the proportion in 2001 (0.8 per cent).
    • The most prevalent main language other than English was Polish at 1% (17,700 people)


    • The proportion of the usually resident population born outside Northern Ireland rose from 9.0 per cent (151,000) in 2001 to 11 per cent (202,000) in 2011. The LGD with the highest proportion of people born in EU accession countries was Dungannon (6.8 per cent).


    • Two-fifths (40 per cent) of usual residents had a British Only national identity, a quarter (25 per cent) had Irish Only and just over a fifth (21 per cent) had Northern Irish Only. All LGDs had significant proportions with a Northern Irish Only national identity ranging from 28 per cent in Omagh to 17 per cent in Ballymena and Carrickfergus.


    • One sixth (17 per cent) of the usually resident population on Census Day 2011 either had No Religion or Religion Not Stated. The prevalence rates for the main religions were: Catholic (41 per cent); Presbyterian (19 per cent); Church of Ireland (14 per cent); Methodist (3.0 per cent); Other Christian or Christian-related denominations (5.8 per cent); and Other Religions and Philosophies (0.8 per cent).


    • Bringing together the information on Religion and Religion Brought up in, 45 per cent of the population were either Catholic or brought up as Catholic, while 48 per cent belonged to or were brought up in Protestant, Other Christian or Christian-related denominations. A further 0.9 per cent belonged to or had been brought up in Other Religions and Philosophies, while 5.6 per cent neither belonged to, nor had been brought up in, a religion.


    The national identity figures (thanks Garza):


    British only - 40%
    British AND Nothern Irish - 6%
    Northern Irish only - 21%
    Irish only - 25%
    Irish AND Northern Irish - 1%
    British AND Irish - 1%
    British AND Irish AND Northern Irish 1%
    Other - 5%

    Actual religion (not religion raised):
    Catholic - 41%
    Pres - 19%
    C of I - 14%
    Meth - 3%
    Other (Christain) - 6%
    Other (Non-Christian) - 1%
    Atheist/Agnostic - 10%
    No Stated - 7%

    Comment:
    • the rise in Catholic numbers (40% last time to 41% this time) isn't that surprising, in fact seems somewhat modest, given the large immigration from Poland and Lithuania in recent times. (Same true for religion brought up in from 44% to 45%). The Census data shows that these accession country residents represnt 2% of NI's population; Poles themselves are more than 1% and they all arrived this decade. They are nearly all Catholic. Stripping them away would have resulted in a fall in the Catholic share of the population. (Edit 12/12/12: in fact the rise in the share of Catholics by religious belief was only 0.5% when you don't round up; see below).
    • It is surprising that there are not more numbers of ethnic minorities, though notably they have more than doubled.
    • There are now 10% of children born to foreign mothers; this is significant and shows how much immigration there has been.
    • An increase in the number of secular people not brought up in any religion is much as expected.
    • The Irish only identity and British only identity figures are very interesting and are new in this census. The NI identity is quite popular with (to me) a surprising number saying they are NI only.




    Full results here:
    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/key_press_release_2011.pdf

    http://www.nisra.gov.uk/Census/key_s...letin_2011.pdf


    Postscript:

    I have checked the figures more accurately to see that number of catholics by religious belief:
    2001: 40.26%
    2011: 40.76%

    So actual share of catholics went up by 0.5% not 1%. I have rounded up to 1% in the title of the thread (which because of rounding up to 40% last time and 41% this time I had computed at 1%, but I see its actually just 0.5% when you get rid of the rounding).
    Last edited by factual; 12th December 2012 at 10:48 PM.

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    Politics.ie Member ArtyisBack's Avatar
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    Excellent result - we see the greening ogf the north continuing, the erosion of the religious and political affiliations with unionism and Protestantism. All good. Onwards and upwards.
    http://ulstersdoomed.blogspot.com/ http://www.requetes.com
    For unionism this is as good as it gets, for nationalism this is the worse it can be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ArtyisBack View Post
    Excellent result - we see the greening ogf the north continuing, the erosion of the religious and political affiliations with unionism and Protestantism. All good. Onwards and upwards.
    61% are either British or Northern Irish and only 25% Irish.

    50% +1 is further away than ever.

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    Politics.ie Member Portadown madman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DT123 View Post
    61% are either British or Northern Irish and only 25% Irish.

    50% +1 is further away than ever.
    Poor Arty jumped into this thread without looking at the bigger picture. Good to see that the younger generation are now seeing themselves as Northern Irish.

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    Politics.ie Member PaddyO'Neill's Avatar
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    Only 40% classed themselves as British only. 50+1 is closer than ever.

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    48% are Protestant or from a Protestant background.
    45% are Catholic or from a Catholic background.

    5.6% have no religious affiliation.

    One can expect an outright majority at the next census; of course, there's no grounds for assuming that will lead to a UI, but one can understand, if not defend, Loyalist fears - the ground is unalterably shifting.

    Your grandaddy's Ulster is no more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glaucon View Post
    48% are Protestant or from a Protestant background.
    45% are Catholic or from a Catholic background.

    5.8 per cent have no religious affiliation.

    One can expect an outright majority at the next census; of course, there's no grounds for assuming that will lead to a UI, but one can understand, if not defend, Loyalist fears - the ground is unalterably shifting.

    Your grandaddy's Ulster is no more.
    An outright majority (i.e more than 50%) of what? Catholic has gone up 40% last time to 41% this time; Catholic by religion brought up in has risen from 44% to 45%. And all this at a time when there was unprecedented immigration from Poland. I am no so optimistic as you that it would increase very much at all next time. Unless there are more Poles coming...

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    Politics.ie Member Legolas's Avatar
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    Most interesting census data...48 % of NI folk included British as a national identity, 29% included Northern Irish & 28 % included Irish.

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    Politics.ie Member PaddyO'Neill's Avatar
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    British Ulster is dead. Let's continue to take the flags down.

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    Politics.ie Member Legolas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glaucon View Post
    48% are Protestant or from a Protestant background.
    45% are Catholic or from a Catholic background.

    5.6% have no religious affiliation.

    One can expect an outright majority at the next census; of course, there's no grounds for assuming that will lead to a UI, but one can understand, if not defend, Loyalist fears - the ground is unalterably shifting.

    Your grandaddy's Ulster is no more.
    Where's all the people the said this census was 50+1 RC guaranteed. And this was with a massive boost from immigration of catholic eastern European countries with high birth rates!

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