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Thread: Similarities Between Afrikaners and the Northern Irish

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    Default Similarities Between Afrikaners and the Northern Irish

    I just had an epiphany of sorts. I realized that there is a similarity between Afrikaners and the Northern Irish; but I also realized I'm a huge hypocrite as I'm absolutely fascinated and enthralled with Afrikaners and their accents, culture and history, yet I am decidedly negative to a degree in my view of the historical settlement of Northern Ireland.

    In both regions, given centuries of besieged (or so they felt) existence and a pioneering spirit (eh, probably Afrikaner than NI) there has been a process of ethnogenesis in which the settlers took on a new ethnic identity. While the Northern Irish are comprised of Scottish and English settlers, they have sunk down deep roots into Northern Ireland which has led to the creation of a new identity, which is tied to the land. The Afrikaners have been molded from their own experiences in South Africa. They are no longer Dutch, French, German and Portuguese; they are Afrikaners. Their blood and ties are deeply into the soil. In both cases, the roots go back some ~400-500 years.

    It makes me wonder that at what point do colonizers become the natives? Even the former head of the ANC called the Afrikaners Africa's only white tribe. Now, I bring Northern Ireland into this as the people there are unlikely to ever want to move to Scotland or England. Northern Ireland is their home.

    Then, well, there's other similarities in regards to minority rule, discrimination, ect...

    Would you agree that there are similarities? And if so, do you believe that both populations have become naturalized and belong to the land as much as the 'indigenous' populations?
    "the long history of drug use and even children's desire for spinning, swinging, or sliding indicates that the drive to alter one's state of mind is universal" - Andrew well

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    Quote Originally Posted by SJMcMahon View Post
    I just had an epiphany of sorts. I realized that there is a similarity between Afrikaners and the Northern Irish; but I also realized I'm a huge hypocrite as I'm absolutely fascinated and enthralled with Afrikaners and their accents, culture and history, yet I am decidedly negative to a degree in my view of the historical settlement of Northern Ireland.

    In both regions, given centuries of besieged (or so they felt) existence and a pioneering spirit (eh, probably Afrikaner than NI) there has been a process of ethnogenesis in which the settlers took on a new ethnic identity. While the Northern Irish are comprised of Scottish and English settlers, they have sunk down deep roots into Northern Ireland which has led to the creation of a new identity, which is tied to the land. The Afrikaners have been molded from their own experiences in South Africa. They are no longer Dutch, French, German and Portuguese; they are Afrikaners. Their blood and ties are deeply into the soil. In both cases, the roots go back some ~400-500 years.

    It makes me wonder that at what point do colonizers become the natives? Even the former head of the ANC called the Afrikaners Africa's only white tribe. Now, I bring Northern Ireland into this as the people there are unlikely to ever want to move to Scotland or England. Northern Ireland is their home.

    Then, well, there's other similarities in regards to minority rule, discrimination, ect...

    Would you agree that there are similarities? And if so, do you believe that both populations have become naturalized and belong to the land as much as the 'indigenous' populations?
    I was born in the north I'm Irish not norther irish my family came from the west could you cut out your generalisation

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    Quote Originally Posted by ItsEvolution View Post
    I was born in the north I'm Irish not norther irish my family came from the west could you cut out your generalisation
    My use of the term "Northern Irish" is because I lack a better one to describe the people who descend from Scottish and English settlers. I could use Ulsterman, but I don't like the term. Don't be so dense.
    "the long history of drug use and even children's desire for spinning, swinging, or sliding indicates that the drive to alter one's state of mind is universal" - Andrew well

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    Politics.ie Royalty toxic avenger's Avatar
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    This has been noted for many years. Joe Lee, in his book 'Ireland: 1912-1985' called it the Herrenvolk mentality...

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    Quote Originally Posted by SJMcMahon View Post
    My use of the term "Northern Irish" is because I lack a better one to describe the people who descend from Scottish and English settlers. I could use Ulsterman, but I don't like the term. Don't be so dense.
    They are British Irish or Northern Irish, simple

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    Your definition of 'Northern Irish' excludes approximately 45% of its population who may have some Norman/English/Welsh/Scottish ancestral element, but who are primarily of Irish descent and who consider themselves to be Irish, not British.

    Perhaps you should refer to Unionists or descendants of British colonists instead of 'Northern Irish'?
    Mark Murray.

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    Janee, maar hoekom is dit vir enigiemand wat die Ulster rugbyspan gesien het nuus...?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sondagefaux View Post
    Your definition of 'Northern Irish' excludes approximately 45% of its population who may have some Norman/English/Welsh/Scottish ancestral element, but who are primarily of Irish descent and who consider themselves to be Irish, not British.

    Perhaps you should refer to Unionists or descendants of British colonists instead of 'Northern Irish'?
    I thnk that is who he meant. But "Afrikaners" just means Africans, doesn't it, and that refers to one specific group of whites in SA, not even to all the whites there. But we all know who they are all the same.

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    Politics.ie Member sondagefaux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SJMcMahon View Post
    My use of the term "Northern Irish" is because I lack a better one to describe the people who descend from Scottish and English settlers. I could use Ulsterman, but I don't like the term. Don't be so dense.
    What's wrong with the terms Unionist or British? After all, the people you describe are descended from British colonists, in the main describe themselves as British and, in the main, wish to maintain the political union between Northern Ireland and Britain.

    I don't see why the well-established terms need to be abandoned.

    FWIW, I remember a Unionist from Northern Ireland complaining loudly to me that he was sick of the BBC referring to people from there as 'Northern Irish'. His attitude was that he was solely British, not Irish in any way.
    Mark Murray.

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    Quote Originally Posted by petaljam View Post
    I thnk that is who he meant. But "Afrikaners" just means Africans, doesn't it, and that refers to one specific group of whites in SA, not even to all the whites there. But we all know who they are all the same.
    It's fluid even then, given the Coloured population are Afrikaans-speaking and share the same familial lines. JP Pietersen: Afrikaans-spreaking, born in Stellenbosch, grew up in Witbank, plays for the Blou Bulle. Afrikaans, Afrikanse or neither?

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