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Thread: Jim DeMint, tea party leader resigning Senate seat.

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    Moderator NYCKY's Avatar
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    Default Jim DeMint, tea party leader resigning Senate seat.

    Jim DeMint has announced his intention to resign his Senate seat to head up the conservative Heritage Foundation. I am not sure if this is a good thing or bad thing but at least he is out of the Senate.

    He has promoted tea party candidates in Senate primaries in the past against more electable centrists. Some of these tea party candidates ended up losing winnable seats, eg Christine O'Donnell. He is probably the single most important reason why the Republicans didn't gain control of the Senate in either of the last two elections. He had promised not to get involved in primaries for the 2014 elections but now that he has a different role, it remains to be seen if he keeps that pledge. He has always been a purist as conservatives go and stymied things like immigration reform.

    This won't affect the arithmetic in the Senate and the Governor Nikki Haley is a Republican and will appoint a successor until the next election in 2014.

    Hopefully DeMint will be less influential now that he is out of the Senate.


    Jim DeMint to resign to head Heritage Foundation - Manu Raju and Scott Wong - POLITICO.com
    Last edited by NYCKY; 6th December 2012 at 08:05 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCKY View Post
    Hopefully DeMint will be less influential now that he is out of the Senate.
    Interesting news. Hard to know how to read it, but it must surely be a sign of the waning power of the Tea Party psychopaths in the GOP leadership. There seems to have been a definite stock-taking exercise in the wake of the election, with sane Governors (such as Haley) in the driving seat, temporarily at least. The same thing happened in the wake of Goldwater's landslide defeat in 1964.

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    The Tea Party must surely be considering launching their own national electoral party independent of the Reps. at this stage -it seems clear the TP Trojan Horse will not succeed in taking over the RP.
    The truth of an idea is not a stagnant property inherent in it. Truth happens to an idea. It becomes true, is made true by events.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Tubbs View Post
    Interesting news. Hard to know how to read it, but it must surely be a sign of the waning power of the Tea Party psychopaths in the GOP leadership. There seems to have been a definite stock-taking exercise in the wake of the election, with sane Governors (such as Haley) in the driving seat, temporarily at least. The same thing happened in the wake of Goldwater's landslide defeat in 1964.
    Do you know what else is psychopathic? Drone-bombing innocent civilians, arming drug cartels, refusing to investigate the Bush administration for war crimes, expanding the war into Yemn, Somalia, Ethiopia and Mali, claiming the power to assassinate anyone at will, claiming the power to indefintiely detain without trial, expanding the Patriot Act, locking up cancer patients for smoking a joint, and creating the most spied on society ever.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Tubbs View Post
    Interesting news. Hard to know how to read it, but it must surely be a sign of the waning power of the Tea Party psychopaths in the GOP leadership. There seems to have been a definite stock-taking exercise in the wake of the election, with sane Governors (such as Haley) in the driving seat, temporarily at least. The same thing happened in the wake of Goldwater's landslide defeat in 1964.
    The Heritage Foundation is funded by wealthy billionaires through organisations like the Scaife Foundation. Such Foundations are now the powerhouse for most intellectual drives in the Republican Party, since its relations with academia are at an all time low.

    The Heritage Foundation are notorious for leading the propaganda campaign against Iraq and Saddam Hussein in the pre-war days.

    Rick Santorum, after he lost his Senate seat, just slipped into a well-paid job with the Ethics and Public Policy Foundation, another right-wing think-tank.

    But those Foundations are ultimately serving the interests of their paymasters, not the people of the United States. University academics are less partisan.

    That a powerful Senator should give up his seat to lead such an organisation just shows the incestuous relationship between the GOP and right-wing think-tanks. In the last analysis, that relationship is not good for the Republicans because it cocoons them in a bubble of beltway groupthink and isolates them from people's real needs and concerns.
    Last edited by owedtojoy; 6th December 2012 at 08:41 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    The Heritage Foundation is funded by wealthy billionaires through organisations like the Scaife Foundation. Such Foundations are now the powerhouse for most intellectual drives in the Republican Party, since its relations with academia are at an all time low.

    The Heritage Foundation are notorious for leading the propaganda campaign against Iraq and Saddam Hussein in the pre-war days.

    Rick Santorum, after he lost his Senate seat, just slipped into a well-paid job with the Ethics and Public Policy Foundation, another right-wing think-tank.

    But those Foundations are ultimately serving the interests of their paymasters, not the people of the United States. University academics are less partisan.

    That a powerful Senator should give up his seat to lead such an organisation just shows the incestuous relationship between the GOP and right-wing think-tanks. In the last analysis, that relationship is not good for the Republicans because it cocoons them in a bubble of beltway groupthink and isolates them from people's real needs and concerns.
    Fair points but the liberal think tanks are often funded by billionaires as well and also attract liberal politicians as chairs and members. He was (still is) powerful in the Conservative movement but not very popular among his colleagues in the Senate as for some survivors like Lisa Murkowskis, he had supported opponents in primaries and as noted was largely responsible for the party not having control of the Senate.

    On a side note Rep Tim Scott is one of the strong contenders to be appointed to the seat being vacated. If promoted Scott would be the only African American in the Senate and the first Republican African American Senator in 40 years.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCKY View Post
    Fair points but the liberal think tanks are often funded by billionaires as well and also attract liberal politicians as chairs and members. He was (still is) powerful in the Conservative movement but not very popular among his colleagues in the Senate as for some survivors like Lisa Murkowskis, he had supported opponents in primaries and as noted was largely responsible for the party not having control of the Senate.

    On a side note Rep Tim Scott is one of the strong contenders to be appointed to the seat being vacated. If promoted Scott would be the only African American in the Senate and the first Republican African American Senator in 40 years.
    The fact is that Jim de Mint will have far more power and influence as the agent of the rich donors to the Heritage Foundation than he ever had as a Senator elected by the people of South Carolina.

    And that is a bad sign for American democracy.

    Possibly good for the Democrats since I think the wheels are going to fall off the Republican Party if it continues on as it is, but bad for US democracy as something integral and whole.
    "A wise man proportions his belief to the evidence" - David Hume

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    Good riddance. He can now spend his days sucking on the corporate teat and exciting himself with deep-breathing audio versions of Hayek, von Mises and Ayn Rand.
    The Democrats wallow in their own corporate liberalism. The Tea Party tried to provoke a right-wing grassroots movement that was led by, funded by and guided by their own super-rich puppet-masters. Their infiltration of the Republican Party backfired spectacularly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYCKY View Post
    Fair points but the liberal think tanks are often funded by billionaires as well and also attract liberal politicians as chairs and members. He was (still is) powerful in the Conservative movement but not very popular among his colleagues in the Senate as for some survivors like Lisa Murkowskis, he had supported opponents in primaries and as noted was largely responsible for the party not having control of the Senate.

    On a side note Rep Tim Scott is one of the strong contenders to be appointed to the seat being vacated. If promoted Scott would be the only African American in the Senate and the first Republican African American Senator in 40 years.
    Republicans would be hard pressed not to pick Tim Scott. He's a a strong conservative in a very conservative state (one with a large black population), is popular with both the establishment GOP and with the tea party, yet he is not as controversial as, for example Michelle Bachmann or Allen West. The only caveat is this: Democrats have done their damndest to sufficiently malign, and slander every up and coming black conservative political figure in order to preserve their impregnable advantage among African-Americans. Witness the past attacks by liberals (often in conjunction with the NAACP and figures in the black church) on Clarence Thomas, Allen Keyes. Janice Rodgers Brown, JC Watts, Condoleeza Rice and Mia Love (and others) as "Uncle Toms" and "sellouts," and it becomes clear that there is more at work here than merely opposing someone for there conservatism. They want to keep the 95 percent of blacks who voted for Obama in their column after 2016.

    Tim Scott is a no brainer for Senate. The question is can he weather the vitriol from the gatekeepers in the African American political establishment to be avoid being marginalized as another "token" black conservative.

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    Politics.ie Member ManOfReason's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by owedtojoy View Post
    The fact is that Jim de Mint will have far more power and influence as the agent of the rich donors to the Heritage Foundation than he ever had as a Senator elected by the people of South Carolina.

    And that is a bad sign for American democracy.

    Possibly good for the Democrats since I think the wheels are going to fall off the Republican Party if it continues on as it is, but bad for US democracy as something integral and whole.
    A bit like if the Democrats put public service unions ahead of the interests of their constituents...oh wait...they do. I believe we have the same problem in Ireland, except there is no Republican Party, just various shades of the Democratic Party. How good is that for US democracy or Irish democracy?
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